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Unscalable Marketing Strategies
Episode 2411th April 2022 • Close The Loop • CallSource
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Hi, welcome to the Close The Loop podcast.

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I'm your host, Kevin Dieny, and today we're going to talk about

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strategies of unscalable marketing.

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I guess I should say, I'm going to be talking about it.

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So when we're talking about an unscalable marketing plan and unscalable marketing

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strategies, we're often talking about the opposite most of the time, right?

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We're we're usually talking about scalable marketing strategies.

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And by that we mean, if we throw some more money at it, right.

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If we can prove that the ad is working when we budget, I don't know,

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$50 a day, a hundred dollars a day.

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What happens if we were to double that budget or triple that budget or 10 X or

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a 100 X that budget, by increasing the scale and the magnitude of that ad, are

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we still going to see the same results?

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And that's what we're usually talking about when we say scalable marketing.

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Because we want to create marketing that scales, because that way we initially

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start out a campaign spending a low amount of money with lower risk, right.

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Investments, risk.

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And then over time we've proven, okay.

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If we increase the budget, we're getting more or an increased amount,

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maybe a slightly diminished amount.

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But at the end of the day, if we can incur, if we can spend the

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most amount of money we have to get the highest ROI possible.

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That's what we'd like to do.

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I mean, just sitting on the money, we could use cash in other ways,

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but it may not have the same return.

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It may not lead to growth for the business.

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So today we're talking about all about growth, but how is it going to come from

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marketing strategies that are unscalable?

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Scalable marketing is generally done by a process, a repeatable process

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that can be done without a person getting in the way as the bottleneck.

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When you can flip on a switch and suddenly spend two or three times more

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and you haven't done anything, right.

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Like I just changed the budget number, and all of a sudden the ad went from

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spending 10 a day to 100 a day, so it's scaled and I haven't had to do

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much, other than adjust the budget.

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That's what we're, that's scalable.

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So what is this unscalable business?

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What are we talking about?

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So unscalable, means something about it requires a person, requires manual,

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requires the process itself may have elements of it that are repeatable

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or that are mechanical or automated.

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But at the end of the day, it's still functionally moving

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along because it's manual.

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So the most a person could possibly do, right.

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You could think about it like, well, how many phone calls could

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a person possibly taking a day?

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Well, it might be close to like a couple hundred or something like that maximum.

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There's not someone who is able to answer 10 phones at once, right.

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It doesn't exist.

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There's a natural limit there and it's pretty low when we're talking about what

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people can do, how people can perform.

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Now, there are extraordinary staff.

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There's extraordinary people out there.

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Just like we have the Olympics that can do things that no one else can do.

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And in some sense, they might be better than the automated process,

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uh, at doing and executing things.

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But humans are still, are still subject to risk, to flaws, to errors,

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especially with repeatable tasks.

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There's problems, that's why a lot of times the assembly lines at

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companies may start out with people.

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But over time as the company grows, they may shift from someone who screws on the

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caps to a robot that screws on the caps.

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Because it can go all day, all the time, all night all the time, and people can't.

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So unscalable is the stuff that people have to do.

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And let's say that there's quadrants.

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So they're scalable on one end and like a Punnett square.

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On one side, it's how scalable it is.

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And on the other dimension, it's how repeatable it is, okay?

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So a scalable and repeatable campaign is what most marketing is all about.

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I would say 80%, 90% of marketing probably falls into marketers

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wanting to be able to find something that works and then crank it up.

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So that it performs at an extraordinary level.

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Even when you spend more, it's making 5 X or 10 X its ROI.

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That's usually the dream, the goal, the ideal.

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Now, scalable, but not repeatable.

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It is sort of like the conundrum.

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I think some people have debated whether this even exists.

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So it, it probably does.

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And by that, I mean, it's an opportunity for an entrepreneur, right?

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So something that's scalable, but not repeatable is something where

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maybe a tool hasn't been invented quite yet, because it hasn't been

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able to make it repeatable, right.

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It hasn't been able to make it so that it can perform that

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function, every single time.

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Because maybe there's a time constraint, seasonal limit.

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I don't want to get too complicated in this, but basically scalable

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and repeatable go hand in hand.

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And so you want that and then there's the unscalable side.

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Okay, so an unscalable and repeatable strategy is something that still requires

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a person to do, but it's something they could do over and over and over again.

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So like taking phone calls.

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That is a good example where someone's sitting there and doing

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the same kind of activity, but it still requires a human to do it.

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So we're talking unscalable requires the human to do it and

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repeatable like the phone call.

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Now, unscalable and not repeatable that would be obviously problematic.

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So we want to stay away from, again, you want to stay away from the

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non repeatable stuff in marketing, because anything that you can't

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repeat, it's once and done and gone.

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Now there are campaigns, there are things like that where it's like, Hey, look, I

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only have one chance to get this right.

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Has to be perfect from the beginning, but generally that's not quite marketing.

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That's more like a perfectionist.

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That's more like striving for perfection and it leaves no room for testing.

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It leaves no room for experimentation.

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And leaves little room for feedback, and for learning.

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You kind of just throwing it up in the air and hoping you get it right.

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So that is not really marketing.

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Marketing is less about taking those extreme hopeful chances and more

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about iterative learning over time, experimentation, testing stuff.

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Anyone can just throw something up in the air, right.

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I can flip coins.

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So we in marketing in your business, you've gotta be after

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things that are repeatable.

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So this episode's all about the repeatable stuff, but still done by people.

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Now why, why are unscalable marketing activities typically ignored?

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Yeah, they can't be scaled, but they tend to be costly.

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Right?

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Hire someone to, you know, pick up the phone, costly.

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To hire someone, to write letters to every client, new customers, costly.

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And so businesses jump in and outsource that kind of stuff, but it's still a cost.

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And so sometimes at the end of the day, it's like, is this worth it?

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So a lot of unscalable marketing activities just aren't worth it,

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because we're generally after a pretty solid return on the stuff

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that we want to do in marketing.

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And if we get too heavy in unscalable stuff, then we may grow to a

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point, but then we're not able to, to grow at a scalable level.

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So there's got to be, I think, is my opinion, a mixture of the

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unscalable with the scalable strategies that you're running.

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So I think we should be very picky about the unscalable stuff we're doing and the

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activities we're doing, because that is more costly, therefore it has to work.

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We need it to be repeatable because we want to see if maybe

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we can tune this to make it work.

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Very few marketing strategies work right off, right off the bat, right.

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You turn on the campaign, an ad or anything, something

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you're going to learn, okay.

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We've got negative keywords to add.

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We've got to trim down this audience.

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We've got to change this ad, the copy.

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Something's not working.

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And that's how it works.

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Every time you do it, you've got to try and test something else to

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see if it's going to get better.

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Their campaigns that we all run should hopefully, over time, be

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improved, you know, one bit at a time.

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In email you may think, well, maybe the sending time is off.

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Maybe the list isn't as clean as it should be.

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Maybe I'm not segmenting my emails as well.

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Now, what does an unscalable activity feel like?

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This is a really good question, right?

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Cause it, it obviously it's done by a person, but generally an

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unscalable activity feels like, man, if I just had more hours of the day

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more time in the day than I would, I would spend it doing X, Y, and Z.

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What is X, Y, Z, right?

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What alternatives are there?

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What are you forced to do manually?

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And you can't just hang it up on an automated solution.

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Now sometimes like business may be like, look, I'm tired of doing this.

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I'm just going to outsource that.

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That's still keeping it unscalable, it's just outsourcing that.

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And maybe your time is more valuable than, what they cost.

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So you're just like an operating cost at that point.

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So another thing is unscalable activities, can be dialed down by

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performing the activity less, and dialed up by performing the activity more.

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A person doing it more.

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And the 'repeatable-ness' of it is that.

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It's important to really get specific here.

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Answering a phone call, the phone calls, never going to go the same every time

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we've talked about this, how different every call is after the first 30 seconds.

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So the first 30 seconds, maybe a very, very, um, repeated, nuanced script.

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But then after that, there's going to be conversational pivots and

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turns that, take that conversation, you know, any which way.

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It's not that the call itself is repeatable after 30 seconds.

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It's not, because you're not going to say the same things,

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but what is repeatable, right.

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Are, there's probably not going to be more than, let's say 10 or 15 objections

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to any businesses, products and services.

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It's probably a pretty slim list.

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Like obviously price is going to be an objection for every single

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service unless you're offering free services or something.

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But still there, there still may not be a cost of price.

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It may be a cost of time.

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So cost or price or something is always an objection, always.

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So while, answering that may not come at the same position in the call may

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not come at the same time in every call.

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A question would not be asked the same way, and you may not want to

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answer the same way, the basics are.

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There's an objection of cost in our business.

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How are we handling that?

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That is still repeatable.

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You can still rehearse that.

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Get that down to the point where you're like, I know how to answer this.

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No matter how it comes at me.

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Now, it's become a repeatable part of my unscalable answering phone calls.

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So that's why it's still really important to know how this stuff is broken down.

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So there's lots of ways that anything can be broken down into

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just repeatable blocks of processes.

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and specifically in a phone call.

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So how does marketing, how does the marketing strategy influence that, right.

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So the things that come up a lot in calls can be, if we see that through

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scoring, it may be an interesting pivot for marketing to be like, well, Hmm.

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What if we answer that question in the ad?

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What if we put that on the landing page?

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What if that's one of the blurbs that's on the landing page?

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So, instead of having to ask that, cause obviously that's on the caller's mind.

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Now the marketing has positioned itself so that these callers have a better

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chance of having known the answer.

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Now, if you splash every ad and every marketing message with the

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15 objections, you're going to have no room for anything else.

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There's lots of ways to influence the unscalable side because

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the unscalable side is going to be smaller numbers, right?

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If someone's only taking a hundred calls in a day, every missing

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one call is 1% of the calls.

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Of the hundred calls, 50% turn into appointments, missing

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one could mean an appointment.

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Missing one could then mean losing a customer.

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You know, that's big, that's a big deal.

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So if marketing can influence the calls, the callers, the

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quality of that coming in.

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Especially before it hits up against an unscalable activity, then

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marketing's doing a huge favor to them because they're not wasting time

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on bad calls or things like that.

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Now evergreen is a great term used for content, that is scalable.

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So let's say you make a video, webinars, or something, but it's really only going

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to be valuable to people for a few weeks.

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Think of like a sports game.

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Everyone wants to watch that sports game live, right.

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Very few people are, are going to want to hold off from seeing the big game

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until two weeks, three weeks later.

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People who watch something way after the fact that it's aired in

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sports is very, very low numbers.

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So why is that?

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That's because everyone wants to experience it live together.

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They don't want to, you know, not know if they're big fans, so people

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don't care about sports, but if you are a big sports fan, generally,

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you love watching the sports live.

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So evergreen is making content designed for anyone to watch it at any time and

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still get a lot of value out of it.

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Like who would want to watch something that's recorded six months ago?

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Well, there's certain types of content people would want to watch like that.

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Like TV shows, movies, people watch them decades after they

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originally aired because the content itself is still relevant to them.

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Making videos is oftentimes unscalable because it's costly and have to be edited.

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A lot of human editing going on there.

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A lot of times the first videos you make you're like, these gotta be evergreen.

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Meaning that they're going to always deliver relevance and value, even

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if I use this video six months from now or a year from now.

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Cause you may say, oh gosh, I don't want to be making a new video every week

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or every month or something like that.

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It's, it's costly.

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So in the content world, evergreen is considered the

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scalable side of content, right?

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In live, one time, real-time content, you can only consume at one time

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or at the time that it aires is definitely the unscalable side.

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But that doesn't necessarily mean that evergreen content is the only

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way to drive demand or drive value for a business to drive growth.

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There's plenty of one-off, one-time, launch only like, look at, look at sports.

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It's a huge market entirely around unscalable, right.

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They had every camera angle possible.

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Every, you know, they have tons of people talking about it.

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Everything's going on.

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Everything's all about the moment.

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And so when you think about how can my marketing content add a

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splash of unscalable or how can it not a splash of scalable.

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For the scalable think, evergreen.

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For the unscalable think, well, how can I make this so valuable

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and so relevant, so important for someone to watch this right now.

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When they do right now, that that has got to answer that question, right?

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It might be something where it's like, look, I'm going to

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offer this Black Friday deal.

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This is a one-time thing for another year.

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Not going to see it.

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It's going to go off one time for a limited period of time.

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And you may devote a lot of resources to making your marketing, your ads, anything

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like that, to capture the interest that's around that seasonal point in time where

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everyone's like thinking, thinking about what am I going to get for Christmas?

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So that's kind of how you identify the activities that are scalable

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and unscalable in your own business too, is, is every, is everything

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I'm doing evergreen, right?

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Am I just throwing a website out there and redoing it in three years?

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Am I just posting social media?

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Just because I'm told to.

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What stuff is really driving value?

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And you're only going to know that if you have a good feedback loop, you have good

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attribution campaign, you know, recording, monitoring, stuff like that to tell you.

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And if you can separate what activities are unscalable from those that

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are scalable, it would be probably pretty fascinating for you to see.

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Wow, hm, whenever I do something like a live video or a webinar or wherever I

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post something that just happened today, or I take a picture of the job site or,

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you know, a holiday party or something.

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That there's some good interaction, there.

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There's some good engagement there and get people engaging and talking.

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And whenever I run a special offer thing, that's the only time people

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come in or, you know, you can probably take a look and see how your

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unscalable and currently scalable activities are working, performing.

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So, and that's also kind of how you evaluate right, how

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much influence they're having.

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When it's, when there's a human part of the process, you do need.

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Evaluate the cost of that as well.

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I mean, it may have greater influence, but it did cost more.

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So at the end of the day, you're not just, you can't just measure things by

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their, you know, front end performance.

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You have to put something on the other side of the scale in terms of cost.

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Okay.

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I got all that.

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I got the great stuff out of it, but gosh, it cost me a lot of money.

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Like I went to this local event.

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And I put up a booth and I got to talk to a lot of people.

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I got four customers out of it.

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It was fantastic.

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The booth didn't cost me anything, but it did cost me like a whole day.

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I did have to go buy a table and I did have to print out some flyers.

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And if you had total light up, it's like, My cost per lead there, it

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was actually pretty high or maybe it was pretty low, I don't know.

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Maybe it did fantastic, but events in person stuff, very unscalable.

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And it has to be, there has to be a way that you evaluate every

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activity in your business to see how well it's performing for you.

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Now as an entrepreneur, you're just like, look my own time, and going to events,

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or self promotion doing live stuff.

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There's a cost, but I have to do it because I need to get, right.

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But as the business grows becomes very important to start looking at.

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Hm.

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How much of my stuff is unscalable?

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The way I grew in the past to get here may not help me keep growing from here.

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I may need more scalable campaigns, more scalable stuff.

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I may need more specialized education, more people, more consulting.

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I mean, uh, an agency, I don't know, whatever you need to then

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at that point scale, the business is going to be very important.

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The next big part of this episode that I want to talk about is

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something that I've done a talk on.

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Talk at conference on, and I spoke on this and that's intimacy.

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So, which do you think is a more intimate, a more engaging experience?

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Okay, so you get to our website and our chat box pops up and says, Hey, would you

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like to book time or set an appointment so that we can landscape your yard, or

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you get to a website and someone named Jen says hi, I see you're looking at,

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you know, our landscaping services.

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If you have any questions, please let me know, I'm here.

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You know, I'm actually right here.

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If you want to talk to me.

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So let's take a pause here.

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They're both getting the same information.

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They're both funneling you down toward an appointment, something like that.

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Something toward whatever you're after.

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Now, the bot is just going to be like, Hey, look, I have one purpose, right?

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My purpose is to get a sale and appointment booked.

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And if you go through that process, to the bottom it's like, yeah, I did it.

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I got an appointment, but the goal of the person may be different.

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Now with the Jen side, they're asking you what your problem

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is, what your questions are.

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You could type in anything you want.

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Jen's going to interpret it and understand what it is, the bots,

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not going to be able to perfectly understand what your problem is.

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So that's why the bot has like more guided experience.

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And on the Jen side, the person's side, you're really able to

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communicate what's happening.

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What's going on.

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The same thing happens with a phone call, phone call, hey, if you're

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here for sales, press one and IVR right here for support, press two.

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If you're here, you know, if you want to talk to somebody else, press

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zero or reception or whatever it is.

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That IVR that's think of that like the robot experience,

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that's the scalable side.

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And that is not intimate at all.

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That is, it's one of those things you're like, let me just get through this fast.

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I can't, um, it's not the most rewarding customer type experience generally.

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So we don't want to, obviously, if you have a conversation with someone who's

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rude or whatever, probably prefer the robot, but when generally speaking.

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Someone whose job is to answer the phones is going to be doing that

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because they're providing an experience for the customer, who's calling.

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That can't be matched by a robot.

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We wouldn't want it to work that way, right.

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They want the first interaction, like the first touch with that customer the

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first real, real time, intimate touch with that customer to be a lot more real.

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And that the value of that intimacy, the closer you are to the real time being in

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right in front of a customer, the better.

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If every customer had to show up in your store, in your place

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of business to talk to you.

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A lot less would, but the experience would be, it would be a lot more telling

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about how serious they are, how committed they are, how interested they are.

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How committed they are.

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How willing they are to, to buy, to spend, to work with you.

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But that's a pretty big deal.

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That's how it used to work back in the day before phone calls and everything.

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Maybe they would write letters.

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I don't know.

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Anyway, so, at scale we'd love phone calls.

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We love chatbots.

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We love, we love everything that helps us do all this stuff at scale, because it's

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expensive to have a person do all this.

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But at the end of the day, at the end of this funnel, the business is

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most often, unless their e-commerce right, is most often positioning

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a person with the customer or with the potential future customer

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with the potential future patient.

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Everything has that human interaction at the end.

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Generally.

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Now, if you're on Amazon, right?

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You're not talking to a person ever.

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So they cater to that experience of look, you can figure it on your own.

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You can buy whatever you want on your own.

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No, one's helping you.

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So some products and services are that way.

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Like, they're like, look, you're here, you're out in the cold by yourself.

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You've got to figure it out like that.

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They will provide reviews, product descriptions, but if you buy the wrong

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thing then it's on you, it's like eBay.

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If you buy it, if you buy a little house thinking you bought a whole

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house and it arrives in your mailbox and it's just a tiny little.

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Like doll version of a house.

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And you thought you were buying a whole one for a steal for 50

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bucks and you know, that's on you.

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Like that's kind of as a e-commerce retail buyer, that's sort of on you.

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Some people don't don't like that.

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They don't like buying shoes online and then getting them, they don't fit or

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clothes they'd much rather go in person to a place and try it on physically, really.

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And the intimacy there is greater.

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That's a big deal.

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When the intimacy point happens, it's usually the highest cost interaction.

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The highest cost conversation in a business is going to be at

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that point where human beings talking to another person.

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Because the person on your team is unable to talk to anyone else, while

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they're talking to that one person.

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They are a hundred percent consumed by that call.

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So when they get there, you want that experience to be stellar, but you

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also don't want to waste you don't want to waste that your call handlers

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time answering calls that are fake and not real, or, spammy or anything.

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That's that's, that's frustrating.

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Obviously you want them to be answering calls.

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You want leads to be coming in.

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You want business to be rolling in and that's going to help your business grow.

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But at the same time, you don't want it to be terrible, horrible experiences.

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You don't want every person that calls to leave hating you because the

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call handler was rude or something.

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So that, that conversation, that intimate point is so vital to do well.

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A lot of what we do is all based on this concept of the intimacy of a

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customer is paramount in marketing.

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When someone sees your ad and they click to your website and then they

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click around, that's all happening without someone guiding them.

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Right?

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If, what, if you can position the chat bot there to be like, Hey, how are you doing?

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But if you can position of someone who finally decides to call say

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hi, I'm putting a face and a name and a voice to this, this, this for

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the first time, that's gonna leave a big impression on that visitor.

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Just because you build it that way, doesn't mean it's all

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going to work out that way.

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You have to create an operational system that feedbacks to you,

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whether it's working or not, right.

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Every unscalable activity is very costly.

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So if you don't have a feedback system telling you how your call

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handling's going, how your chats are going, they're handled by people.

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How any human things going, the feedback loop on that isn't giving

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you the answers you need start there.

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Cause that's so costly to operate in a business without having

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any feedback loop whatsoever.

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It's a big deal.

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So another thing to consider when we're talking about what

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strategies, what unscalable strategies should we be looking at?

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Right.

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What should we do?

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That's going to be the last pivot here.

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What strategies should I be running?

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So look at your competitor.

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What unscalable marketing activities are they doing?

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Are they going to events?

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Are they putting up billboards?

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Are they, you know, standing around twirling signs on the corners?

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Are they calling out?

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Are they, you know, how has the process of them calling in.

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Visit their website.

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What kind of stuff do you think they're doing?

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Are they promoting?

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Are they running ads?

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If you go to Facebook, you can look up any brand, any company on Facebook and

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you can see if they're running ads.

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You could see what ads they're running, it's called the ad tool, ad library.

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So if you want to see if they're running ads on Facebook, you can go there.

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With Google, you can't quite see that there are tools I'd recommend.

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There's a tool I recommend that I use called SpyFu.

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It will give you a, a good ballpark of what ads, uh,

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and other businesses running.

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I think you can even go for free and just see like an example of

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one, if you want to S P Y F u.com.

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SpyFu, uh, they're great company for that.

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To doing some competitive research.

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So things that you'd really like that that are really good ideas

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to improve is what I mentioned it.

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Phone calls, monitor, score, record, you know, get alerts

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when you miss an opportunity.

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Like that handles the phone call that could be for sales support, anything.

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You could consider call centers, things like that to help offset that.

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Outsourcing, uh, things like partnerships are also unscalable.

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You may have a deal where you're a business that, that specializes in,

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let's say plumbing during the day, but very special kinds of plumbing.

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Like let's say, old homes or something like that.

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You may say anyone who calls in the middle of the night.

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You may say, oh, okay, anyone who calls for not that kind of service.

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You may say, wow, I'm getting a lot of people just because

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I'm inherently a plumber.

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I'm getting a lot of calls for services.

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I don't like to offer.

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I don't prefer to offer, they're low margin for me.

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My guys are more skilled.

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I need these higher margin jobs.

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I don't want to be sending them out in the middle of the night.

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Cause that's not, you know, that's not the business, I am.

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My business runs with these margins at this way.

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So you may say, Hmm, what if I have a partnership with another plumber

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who is, who is specialized in the 24 7, simple plumbing, uh, that's their

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margins, that's their business type.

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What if we partnered up and they all send the calls to them that are

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insufficient, that are not ideal for me.

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And they will consider sending the jobs over to me that are not great for them.

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Maybe there's a partnership there.

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Maybe there's another way you can partner with another type of business altogether.

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You can complete more jobs because they're doing something

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and you're doing something.

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Partnerships or unscalable, they're repeatable, but they're unscalable because

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they require some agreement in place.

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There's still things around it.

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There's still a lot of checking to make sure everyone's complying and

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everyone's still happy and good.

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You're, you're still delivering value to the customer and they're happy that

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you may not provide the service, but you're giving them a recommendation

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from someone that you prefer, you trust to do, perform the service.

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You're still helping them, which still at the end of the day, that customers

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can be like, wow, that was great.

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If I ever have a, you know, an old plumbing job or a specialized

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job, then I know who to call or I know who to recommend.

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That's partnerships.

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I mentioned before events, webinars, things like that, live webinars,

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especially on the unscalable type that, that provide a lot of value.

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There's tons of people trying to do this, do it yourself, plumbing online, right.

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Trying to do jobs online.

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And so if you've make a whole channel devoted to, you know, how

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to do this and that, on YouTube.

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That could be huge, for people in an interesting way

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to get your name out there.

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And all it would take is, you know, someone record what they're doing

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in a home and get permission by the owner, the homeowner to do so, or

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maybe for a discount or something.

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You can put those videos on your website.

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People might be like, okay.

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Yeah, this guy really wants to help do it yourselfers, but obviously when things

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go wrong, they know who to call, right.

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Something like that.

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If you really want to tell a story, like on your website,

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it's the content, the messaging.

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Maybe seen by a lot of people, but creating content, creating a

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way that you can tell your story.

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It may be an unscalable process to get it done.

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There might be a video, an interview.

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You may have to write some stuff in person.

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Like you may have to write it.

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A compelling story.

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A compelling messaging is usually done by a person at the end of the day.

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Handwritten letters to clients and customers, favorite customers

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after big jobs, you know, thanking them for their time or anything.

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Or, if a patient had a rough time.

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You may have like five letters, you know, templates, you have, you may open one

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up, change a few things and then, you know, send it off to that patient to say,

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Hey, you know that you had a hard time.

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I hope you're doing well.

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Some people have, might be like, wow, I've never gotten a letter like that from my

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dentist before that could be a big deal.

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I don't know.

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Taking that time, even though it's a template taking that time to write it or

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change it or update it, unscalable, right.

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So unscalable strategy there.

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If you do things in house, generally, it's going to be considered,

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unscalable, if you're like, Hm.

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I like a social media person to help me everyday.

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You know, post pictures, post things, get the word out.

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I've seen a lot of businesses do really well that way expand

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their reach, especially that.

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And then asking a customer to, to leave a review, to give you

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feedback on their experience.

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Right?

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Very unscalable.

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Now it's unscalable, especially because your end of the day, your customers,

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your patients, whoever's coming in, you know, your, your jobs are not at

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tens, thousands hundred thousands, like degree changing overnight, you

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know, and you're getting however many jobs or however many patients you're

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getting, it's fairly unscalable, but.

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If you can, you know, not every person that don't leave a review or

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leave you 50 or a hundred reviews, they're going to take the time to

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write maybe one or two and that's it.

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But reviews can be a big deal for a business.

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Other people are going to see it trust you more.

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It's it's really hard to get reviews.

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That's why, you know, asking for them in an unscalable way

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is frustratingly difficult.

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You can train your team, your staff.

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I dunno everyone in your company, if people on the phone to be, to remember

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to ask, and it's hard to follow, you know, remember to ask every time

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or remember the right moment to ask after someone's upset and yelling.

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Maybe not the best time after someone's excited and happy,

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it might be better, you know?

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I don't know.

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It's important to consider that unscalable marketing activities at a business have

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a pretty high ability to generate an influence revenue, to influence growth,

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just like scalable activities do.

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And they shouldn't be discounted.

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They shouldn't be tossed out just because they require a person to do.

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Just because they're unscalable in that way.

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And obviously anything that's not repeatable.

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You're going to have a lot of chance involved there, right.

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But if you can make something repeatable, even though it's done by a person and

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it's still, you know, ROI positive, look it's worth considering keeping that, or,

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making sure it's still a part of your overall plan, your overall marketing plan.

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So if you can identify, unscalable marketing strategies and scalable

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ones that you're already doing or new ones you'd like to try, maybe

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from the suggestions I gave you.

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Then I think that will really set you up in a place where you're, you're both

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running strategies, but also you've got to be considering how they're being measured,

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how they're being tracked, right?

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The feedback loop like episode one, how that's all giving you

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information, you need to do it better.

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And then once you do know, okay, these activities, marketing, sales, otherwise,

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whatever it is, unscalable or scalable, this is the return I'm getting.

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Then you have a very good case to say, okay, I'm going to stop these,

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or I'm going to do these right.

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You're after growth, you've got to be after more profit.

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So it, it means trying things constantly cutting things out that don't work and

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pushing, putting more gas to things that do work until they hit a ceiling.

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I have never seen any marketing strategy that, that didn't hit a ceiling.

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And just because it's unscalable, you might think, well, this is only

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going to impact like 10 patients or a hundred patients, right.

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If the potential is there, even if it's small, it could still

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be a positive thing to do.

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It's just gotta be evaluated by someone in the business and owner,

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a leader in the business who can see the whole, the big picture.

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And then finally, the last thing I'd want to mention here is the intimacy part.

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So, what are you doing?

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What is your business doing today to improve the quality of the

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one-to-one human to human interactions your businesses is having with

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customers today, with patients today?

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How are you improving that?

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Because that is such an important part of any business, right?

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How will the customer interacts.

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The experience of the patient, the customer, the consumer that they have with

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your business is really going to pave the way for the future in a way, in a way that

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it's okay to make mistakes in the short term, but in the longterm, you have to

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be progressing in a customer centric way.

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Your customers are going to tell you how well things are

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performing that you're doing today.

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You have been doing in the past.

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It may not be the golden ticket to know what you need to do in the future, but

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it is going to tell you how well things are working that you've been doing.

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That's really critical and really key.

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I'd say give unscalable marketing a shot.

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Give it a try.

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Look at it, measure it, track it.

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Don't throw it out the window, because you know, there's a lot of bottlenecks.

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Like you can only do it in, you know, one at a time.

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Writing a letter of one at a time, but there's value there.

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It's worth trying.

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And.

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Uh, I've done it.

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I've been surprised and shocked by it.

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I never thought I'd be an advocate of unscalable.

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I just love the scalable side, especially in I'm a, you know, I'm a digital

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marketer at heart, so everything there is all about scalable, but

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the blending is where it's all at.

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It's what it's all about.

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So I really appreciate your time.

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You can find me on LinkedIn, you know, comment, let me know if you

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have any feedback on this episode.

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I'd love to hear it and good luck with the unscalable marketing.

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