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₿HS003: Elly & Asher Pembroke and the NextGen
Episode 35th October 2023 • Bitcoin Homeschoolers • Scott and Tali Lindberg
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SHOW TOPIC:

Homeschoolers align on principle of freedom but vary on approaches to schooling.  In this conversation we hear from experienced homeschoolers and bitcoiners, Elly and Asher, and their lessons learned hosting a homeschooling panel at TABConf.

IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:

  • Elly and Asher’s path to Bitcoin and homeschooling
  • Taking initiative by organizing NextGen Village at TABConf
  • Why a homeschooling panel at a technical conference
  • Homeschoolers align on principle of freedom but vary on approaches to schooling
  • Homeschoolers agree on keeping children out of public system and that doing so gives them advantages and opportunities
  • What homeschooling actually looks like varies greatly from family to family  
  • The 3D mempool puzzle as a teaching tool for the non-technical
  • There are so many resources.  Be creative.
  • Bring your families to conferences like TABConf

RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE SHOW:

HAPPY TO HELP:

  • Tali's Twitter @OrangeHatterPod
  • Scott's Twitter @ScottLindberg93
  • Scott's nostr npub19jkuyl0wgrj8kccqzh2vnseeql9v98ptrx407ca9qjsrr4x5j9tsnxx0q6
  • Free Market Kids' Twitter @FreeMarketKids
  • Orange Pill App @FreeMarketKids
  • Free Market Kids' games including HODL UP https://www.freemarketkids.com/collections/games

WAYS TO SUPPORT:

We are essentially our own sponsors and are so grateful for all of you who support this show.  Thank you!

STANDING RESOURCE RECOMMENDATIONS:

Transcripts

Scott:

Hi, everybody.

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Welcome to today's show.

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Tali and I sit down with a couple

of very active Bitcoiners and

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homeschoolers, Elly and Asher Pembroke.

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They're wonderful people who

embrace self custody of education.

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I think you're going to

really enjoy this chat.

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Note, for those that are new to the

show, we don't actually have sponsors.

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Tali and I have a

company, free market kids.

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If you want to support us, please check

out our materials there, especially

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the Bitcoin mining game, huddle up and

with that, sit back and enjoy this very

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thoughtful discussion with Elly and Asher.

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All right, this is exciting we, we have

a couple of guests today and we're going

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to talk about Bitcoin homeschoolers and

they have a really unique background.

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We have Elly and Asher.

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They're the ones that helped us

realize what TabConf was all about.

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We'll get into that in a second, but,

let's just go ahead and jump right in.

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So.

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Welcome guys.

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I, I would I think a lot of people

who we're going to reach out to

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haven't met you yet because you

guys, obviously, if you're in the

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more technical side of the Bitcoin.

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There are people in that community

that know you, but we're coming at this

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purely from a homeschooling standpoint.

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So maybe before we get into some

of the details with TabConf and the

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homeschooling, the things that connected

us, if you guys wouldn't mind doing a

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real quick introduction on yourselves

and maybe how you got into Bitcoin.

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Elly: Yeah.

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Thank you, Scott, for

having us on the show.

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, Asher: I'm Asher and this is Elly.

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, we met in, , grad school and that's when

I started getting interested in Bitcoin.

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I'd read the white paper and I was really

intrigued by the, the connection to

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energy because we were both in physics.

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, so we were getting our, our, our

doctorates and, and I was doing space

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weather, she was doing nano-physics.

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Elly: I actually from Germany,

I was born in Russia, grew up in

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Germany and came to Texas for grad

school, which is where I met Asher.

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And it's a tale as old as time.

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We have two children now, we homeschooled

them, and it was in grad school where we

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were both working on our science degrees

when we first heard about Bitcoin,

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thought it was intriguing and interesting.

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We thought the technical specifications,

the code was sound, was well designed,

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and we, while we didn't understand all

the implications and all the details of

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it, we thought it was important enough.

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That it's worth looking into and around

that time that we first heard about

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Bitcoin, Gavin Andreessen had a website

up where all you needed to have is a

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Bitcoin client with a Bitcoin address

and he would send you a free Bitcoin.

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He called it the Bitcoin faucet.

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So with nothing to lose.

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I thought that might be, yeah.

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A good way to get our first Bitcoin.

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Scott: Cool.

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Yeah.

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Just , for the audience, , Tali and I

had this really cool opportunity to,

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to hang out , with Elly and Asher for a

few days in Atlanta and their technical

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background is to me, really interesting.

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Tali and

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I

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Scott: came from a very different aspect

of this and the level of detail that they

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can get into on Bitcoin is just awesome.

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It's just really, it's really cool.

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That's not the purpose of , this, , we're

going to focus on the homeschooling side.

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So can, let's, let's transition

to how we got to Atlanta.

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What's going on first, let's maybe

tell everybody who doesn't know yet.

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What is like at a high

level, what is TabConf?

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And then specifically, what was the panel

that led two non technical people like,

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like Tali and myself to this conference?

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,

. Asher: Yeah, so the Atlanta Bitcoin Conference is a technical conference

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that's started by Michael Tidwell,

and it's, it's a, it's a very unusual

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conference in that it allows the it's

sort of self organizing, so it's split up

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into villages, and the village leaders are

allowed to basically control the schedule

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of events for their for, for their domain.

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So it has a pleb dev village.

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It has a lightning village.

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And Elly and I had were interested

in creating a space where people who

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were used to coming to more technical

conferences could be comfortable

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also, , bringing their kids and having

activities and things for, for them to do.

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Elly: So when you say villages,

I don't think it make it is

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clear what you mean by that.

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So it's just different rooms.

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There's four different spaces that each

have a stage and that is organized or, you

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know, the schedule is filled by the people

who are responsible for those stages.

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And Asher and I were responsible for

one of the rooms and one of the stages.

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While the other three, including the

main stage, focus on top down, front

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you know, talks that are given with

an audience that just listens, which

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is a good way of learning, but it's

not everybody's way of learning.

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And we decided that it would

be great to have a space where

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learning happens a bit differently.

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It happens by experience, by implementing

the things that you've learned.

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Buying something with Lightning,

playing games, having conversations,

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talking about things other than how

Bitcoin works technically, which is

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what most of the other stages are about.

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And Just a way to build community

and have fun and learn about

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Bitcoin, but at the same time, make

it accessible for the people that

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we're building this hyper bitcoinized

world for, who are our children.

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And if our children can get an idea for

how Bitcoin makes the world a better

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place and that it's fun and that you can

experience it and not just learn about

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it from some speaker on the stage, then.

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Maybe we can build a world that

where Bitcoin is just normal part of.

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Scott: Well, hats off to you guys because

I, Tali and I feel very passionate.

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I probably should just let her speak

for herself, but we, when we talk

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with people at other meetups when we

travel, we always ask them, make this a

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family event, bring your pre coiner or

non coiner, whatever you want to call

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your significant other or your kid.

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Bring your friend, bring someone

who's not yet already in the space.

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So hats off to you guys for

trying to create that and

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it's, you guys have done that.

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Did two years in a row, three

years in a row now that you're the

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organizers for the Next Gen Village?

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Elly: So Tapcons has been going on for

six years and it's our second year in a

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row to have a room dedicated to the next

generation and experiential learning.

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And I want to say that we

couldn't do it without awesome

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contributors such as yourselves.

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I'm so glad that demoed your game.

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Huddle up and we're just so grateful

that there's people like you, people

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like Andy Schroeder, people that

contribute what they have built to the

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space that really makes it what it is.

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Well, we

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Scott: appreciate the opportunity.

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We had a blast.

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We want to come back.

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So this again, this is, this is a

podcast focused on the homeschooling

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You.

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Invited us to come out to speak on

a homeschooling panel, which is just

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like, I, it didn't make any sense to me.

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I'm like, this is a technical conference

and there's a homeschooling panel, but

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there was a lot of interest, like as

you just looked at throughout the day,

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I didn't, I mean, I didn't spend a lot

of time in the others just because of

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what we were doing to, to make sure

things in the room are going smoothly.

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But my impression was that this

was, this was a pretty well received

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breakout session, if you will.

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So, I mean, that's the purpose

of the, the, this podcast is

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we want to reach other people.

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There are a lot of people out there that

have questions, their, their families,

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they're planning to have a family and

they're thinking about homeschooling,

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or maybe they already have children

and they are considering homeschooling

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, there was a lot of interest in

like, wow, how do I do this?

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I'm interested in this, you

know, why should I do this?

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So to me there, that was my

impression, but so I'd like to like,

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first of all, what, what inspired

you to, to have a homeschooling

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panel at a technical conference?

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And then secondly, tell us, like, did

it, did it meet your expectations?

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What did you learn from it?

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Get into what your thought process here.

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Yeah.

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Elly: So it begins with us

being homeschoolers and.

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We homeschool our two children, and we,

the freedom that it offers us helps us

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bring our children to PAPCOM, so they're

always involved, they're involved in

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creating the space and leading some of

the workshops giving a talk, and They

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are as much part of Capcom as we are.

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So

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Asher: it felt very natural to, to do.

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Having, taking them to many other

conferences and, and interacting

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with other other people who have,

who, who are in Bitcoin have kids,

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but usually don't bring them along.

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It became pretty clear that just the,

the other things that are associated with

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Bitcoin in terms of self sovereignty And

you know, autonomy, those things resonate

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very well with, with with homeschooling.

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So I've never met a single Bitcoiner who,

who wanted to put their kids in school.

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It's always sort of like, like,

Oh, I would homeschool if I

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could, but I can't, you know?

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And yeah, so it was, I think it was just

a very natural consequence of, of that.

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Elly: The, there are a lot of

values that are overlapping between

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Bitcoiners and homeschoolers.

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And you're right in that.

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The response was surprisingly positive,

or I wasn't surprised that it was

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positive, but I, I did not expect

there to be people, the, the audience

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filled and standing room filled and,

you know, people trying to get into

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the room just to hear three families

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They, Bitcoin, what brought the, how

they homeschool, what brought them to

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homeschooling their kids, how they,

they have started and how it's going.

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And it's, it was, I'm so glad that we

did this panel because it did, I feel

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like it was a good representation and

showed people that even if you have

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very similar values, you can still

homeschool in very different ways.

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And those are all.

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Good ways to homeschool there, there's no

single right or wrong way to homeschool.

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So,

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Scott: so what would be, one or

two for those that didn't have

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the benefit of being in that?

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Well, well, let me say this.

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I have, they released yet the video,

they recorded that session, right?

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Is that out yet?

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Elly: The video is not out

yet, but it is being edited.

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So in the court, usually all the

videos of all the talks and panels

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are out before next year's TAPCON.

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So it can be released throughout the year.

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And we can never tell.

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Asher: So what we should

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Scott: do is as a follow up to this, when

it is released, let us know, because we

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can go back into the show notes later.

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And we can add that there.

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So since that's not available, can you

highlight one or two takeaways from

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the panel to give the audience a taste?

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For example, what did, what were the

one or two things that you would say

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you took away from that discussion?

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Was there anything that really

stood out to you one way or another?

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Elly: What stood out to me is, what I've

mentioned already, is that you can have.

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All the families that were on

stage had very similar values, were

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all very freedom loving families,

were both, both had reasons for

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running towards something, but also

running away from something, so.

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We, we all agreed that it's

worth keeping our children out

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of the public school system.

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And we all agreed that homeschooling

them would give them advantages and

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opportunities that they wouldn't

have had in a public school system.

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But what homeschooling actually

looked like for the three families

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whether it was very structured

or not very structured, whether.

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That we lived on the homestead or in

the city, whether we focused on skills

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that are more for survival or more

for technical patient, I don't know

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how to say, ability there, what, what

do you end up focusing on is what's

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important to the parents and the

children themselves and Can lead to great

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education for the children, no matter how

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Scott: it was done.

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That's true.

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I mean, it's permissionless.

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Right, Tali?

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Did you have any thoughts on that?

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I mean, I think that's pretty accurate.

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The three families up there

absolutely had the same values.

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I agree with that.

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And in terms of different styles, I

don't know if you did that on purpose.

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Or not when you were picking out your

panelists, but the variety of how people

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do it, it's really up to, it's really

up to you to decide what to, what you

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want the curriculum environment to

be, what you want the and everything.

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I mean, I, I actually appreciated

the fact that not everybody on

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stage agreed with each other.

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Everybody agreed with

the principle of freedom.

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Everybody agreed with self custody

and the education, but how you

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apply that to your family, what

you thought best for your kids.

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That was up to you as a parent to

decide and, and I think the fact that

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we didn't all agree with each other

was actually a benefit of that panel.

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I, I, what do you think, Tali?

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Any thoughts?

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Well, my

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Tali: thoughts are...

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A little bit sort of going past

what we discussed in the panel,

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I was just thinking as you guys

were talking about it, that in a,

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a homeschooling journey, it's very

possible that we'll start out with one

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style, , whether it's very structured

or unstructured and throughout time.

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Based on what we observed, new

things we're learning, what we're

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seeing, what works and doesn't work

with our children, we can adapt.

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So in the homeschooling journey,

which I'll just roughly say is about

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12 years or so, you, you can kind of

go in and out of the structure versus

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unstructured, homestead versus city kind

of thing, and overall still just provide

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an exceptional education that cannot

be replicated in a public or private

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Elly: school setting.

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Yes.

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And opportunity costs to anything, right?

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There's we're trying to give,

every parent is trying to give

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their kids the best opportunities.

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And the best nurturing that they

can, but there, there's, you can't

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possibly provide them with everything.

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So there is a picking and

choosing that's going on and it

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does change over time as well.

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Like you said, Tali, but in the end

the children will grow into adults.

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And if they have learned that they can.

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Go out and find their own sources and

their own learning material and they

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can learn anything and pick up any skill

that they want, then we've done our

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Scott: job.

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So as you look forward to next

year, based on the success of this

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year, what, what are your thoughts

on what you want to do next?

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Because you hit a nerve with this,

you hit like a pretty strong theme

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with this I think that's pretty

neat and it takes, it takes a lot of

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effort to put, to organize events.

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It takes, time to do that.

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What are your thoughts?

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You guys put a lot of work, a lot of

effort into making that successful.

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We got a lot out of it and I think

the others in the audience do.

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What do you, what are your thoughts

now as you think about next year?

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What do you want to, what do you

want to do to build on your momentum?

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Asher: Well, for me One goal is, is

to get more kids involved in families.

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The kids can bring their

parents to but People are

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Elly: still hesitant to bring

their families, unfortunately.

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So we, we want to

encourage people to bring

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Asher: their families.

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Yeah.

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And we kind of plan around the space.

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We allocate the amount of space

relative to how many people,

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how much interest we receive.

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So if, if your listeners.

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start, , pinging us on X or wherever it

would be great to, to get a better sense

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because there are larger there's a lot of

activities we could do especially around

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you know, hands on experiences, like

explaining how different mechanisms within

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Bitcoin and, and layer two or three stuff.

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I there's, there's a lot of other

things we could do if we knew

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beforehand who was going to be there.

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I should

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Elly: say that we plan to run the

NextGen Village again next year.

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Absolutely.

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I think it's always well

received, so this will be our

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third year in a row running it.

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And like I said, it can't be what

it is without great contributors.

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We do try to provide activities and.

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Workshops and things to

do for people of all ages.

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If someone has a great idea, great

activity A workshop that they would like

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to run, a skill they would like to teach.

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Asher: For example so the last couple of

years, our, our son, he's, he has been

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giving talks on, specifically on Digital

logic and he's, he's nine years old.

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He's, he's he's very Let's just say

gifted at, at doing things with his,

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his, his mind that we're not, or I

don't believe I'm personally capable

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of keeping up with him anymore.

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So ironically, like, I, I guess

this is kind of a point on how our

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different styles of homeschooling.

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So due to this, this sort of

this opportunity that, that

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that we have to be flexible.

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We're, we're I wasn't able

to actually be on the panel.

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I sort of came in at the very beginning,

but I sort of anticipated that my son

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might need more attention from me.

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So I kind of sort of counted on the

fact that something might happen

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and he might need my, my attention.

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So.

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Sure enough, within like five

minutes of the panel starting,

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I had to run out of the room

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Yeah.

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Yeah, yeah.

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So so yeah, I had to step

out with to, to tend to him.

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Mm hmm.

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Elly: And I'm glad you did that way.

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I was able to stay on the panel

and continue the conversation.

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Asher: So so we, so every year we make

sure that we, he has time to prepare for,

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for the talk that he's going to give.

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And and he's always

very excited about that.

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And it was funny, like that morning

I asked him, like you know, as for,

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I woke him up and I was like, we, you

know, it's your time for the talk.

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And, and are you nervous?

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And he's like, No, I'm not nervous.

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I've done it before.

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You know, this is his third, or it was his

third or fourth talk at a conference and

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it was just, it's become natural to him.

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My daughter also, our daughter

also gave a talk last year on on

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Elly: designing 3D printing projects in

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Asher: Tinkercad.

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And,

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Elly: She chose not to

give a talk this year.

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Yeah.

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Asher: And then another activity we

do is this mining pool activity where

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we, we, we've developed and designed

this, this puzzle, this 3d cube that so

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between my son and I, he sort of was,

he was studying cubic equations and we

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wanted to, I wanted a way to visualize

what he was doing in his, in his mind.

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And so we built this thing.

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And we started playing with it and

realized like, this is a really good

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analog for, for, to teach people

about mining and sort of the, the the

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considerations that miners take into

account when they construct a block.

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In terms of in terms of maximizing

profit fees and so forth.

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So that's become a really, you know, a

mainstay of the, of the village is that we

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have this huge, you know, literal mining

pool of little colorful transactions.

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And it's great to see how people

assemble their blocks and, and and

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then we pay out in sats for their.

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For their solutions if they generate a

valid, if they generate a valid block

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within the block size limit, then we, we

actually pay them an equivalent number.

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Scott: Can you go a little deeper on this?

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I'm glad you're hitting on this.

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I want to get to it later because I,

I feel that there are some people.

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:

Who just don't learn the same way

as, as others in terms of like,

353

:

for me, I learned a lot about

Bitcoin through podcasts and books.

354

:

And one of the reasons that Tali has said

multiple times that she's even in the

355

:

Bitcoin space now is because I was trying

to explain to her things with physical,

356

:

I was using Mahjong tiles at the time,

but we've graduated now to the full

357

:

game that you guys were talking about.

358

:

I think there's two aspects of it.

359

:

First of all, it, it attests to.

360

:

How creative you can be as a

homeschooling parent, because you,

361

:

if you look at this as a lesson for

your son, think of all the things he

362

:

learned way beyond whatever it is, I

mean, he's learned how to manufacture

363

:

design source like he's, and now he

has to present that to other people.

364

:

There's a whole host of skills that as a

parent, you have helped him to develop.

365

:

The second thing is when you look at that.

366

:

I think this, this is one of

the things going back to the way

367

:

that the villages were organized.

368

:

It was, it's a, it's a, just for

those that don't know, you had this

369

:

like a corridor with several rooms,

like conference rooms off to the

370

:

side and they're all labeled village.

371

:

So it's entirely possible people were

at that conference and had no idea what

372

:

they could have experienced in the rooms.

373

:

And I think this, this cube Which I'm

going to ask you to describe a little

374

:

bit more detail, just this is a way can

reach a lot of other people who are less

375

:

technical to physically show, let them

play with the, let them try to get things

376

:

in there and then make an analogy and

say, this is, this is what's going on

377

:

when they're trying to, when a miner is

trying to fit quote unquote transactions

378

:

into a block and making a decision about

what to do and the constraints and all

379

:

the things that are involved with it.

380

:

It's a really cool teaching

tool, but not just for kids.

381

:

You could reach other

people with that, but yeah.

382

:

So we're not doing a

383

:

Asher: video.

384

:

Elly: I agree with you, Scott.

385

:

And this is a teaching tool that

I've used since in other contexts.

386

:

I've taught a course on Bitcoin

101 that is supposed to introduce

387

:

non technical people to Bitcoin.

388

:

And the best feedback that I've received

is I understand Bitcoin a little bit

389

:

better now, now that I've played with

a cube and that's why we're doing this.

390

:

It's not why we came up

with it in the first place.

391

:

The Atcher already explained

how the idea was born.

392

:

And when, once we had rearranged

the different blocks within the

393

:

block template, we noticed that

it's actually just fun to play with.

394

:

It, even without the Bitcoin

explanation behind it, it's fun

395

:

for children to stack the blocks.

396

:

It's fun for adults to assemble a three

dimensional puzzle until it forms a cube.

397

:

Definitely something that's so much

fun that we thought that our family

398

:

should not be the only ones that

benefit from being able to play with it.

399

:

And that's how we had the acrylic

blocks professionally made.

400

:

And we ordered a hundred sets

and started selling them in

401

:

addition to just playing it.

402

:

So you can buy a set yourself from

our Instagram page, you can just

403

:

message me and I'll mail you a set

and find out for yourself how miners

404

:

put transactions into the block

template to create a valid Bitcoin

405

:

Asher: block.

406

:

Scott: Yeah.

407

:

Oh, go ahead.

408

:

Sorry.

409

:

Yeah.

410

:

Asher: And to the point about it being

a an educational resource for our

411

:

children, it's, you know, we don't, we

don't, we basically sell them at cost.

412

:

But Silas, our son, he gets a little

commission every time we sell one.

413

:

And he's there, he's he's very

proud of his work and, and he helps

414

:

assemble and, and his sister they

assemble every block together and

415

:

they package them and and so we've.

416

:

We put them to work, I hope, whenever

417

:

Elly: you say that.

418

:

Yeah, it's part of why we decided to have

them be available for purchase is because

419

:

we wanted to introduce our children

to what it's like to run a company, to

420

:

have a product that sells, to have to

package it and mail it and all the, and

421

:

pay taxes on it and get a commission.

422

:

These are all skills that

they are learning early on.

423

:

And even if our little company is not.

424

:

Exactly pitting the belts around our

house, it's still worth it for that

425

:

educational element of running a

company that early on in their lives.

426

:

Scott: Yeah, there's so many

things to learn with that.

427

:

It's just, so folks, what this thing looks

like, if I could describe, I can't do

428

:

it justice, it, these acrylic blocks are

different sizes and they're translucent.

429

:

So we.

430

:

They have a light board set up so you

set this out and it's like a whole

431

:

series of matrix looking different

colors staring back at you in the, and

432

:

your, your job is to assemble those

into a cube and if they don't fit, that

433

:

means your transaction is too large

and it, the, you can't mind that block.

434

:

So it's very visually attractive,

like it grabs people's attention and I

435

:

think it's pretty I think people want

to play with it just because of that.

436

:

They don't even know what they're

learning, they just like to...

437

:

Go play in stack with the cubes, but

438

:

Elly: so so children tend to be very

intuitive about it, and they, they just

439

:

want to start they don't even want to hear

an explanation of how you should go about

440

:

completing this 3d puzzle versus adults.

441

:

tend to want to know, why am I doing this?

442

:

What, what's the background?

443

:

How is it, how does it relate to Bitcoin?

444

:

And we've had, yeah, a lot of engineers

actually really enjoy the puzzle.

445

:

So a lot of the blocks have sold

as kind of a Christmas gift for

446

:

the engineer and the family.

447

:

That's awesome.

448

:

We've just been putting

together 3D puzzles.

449

:

They're

450

:

Scott: awesome.

451

:

We need to, we'll get the,

make sure we'll put a link.

452

:

You guys can give it to us and

before we get to the end of the show,

453

:

we'll ask you guys for, to give out

your Instagram or whatever other

454

:

information we can do to have people

reach out to you and support you.

455

:

But one of the last things that I

wanted to ask about was just what

456

:

else would you, it can be resources,

it could be just your advice on

457

:

anything, like just general advice.

458

:

What would, if you were

talking to a family that.

459

:

There was a, the, the couple is they're,

they're Bitcoiners and they're, they're

460

:

either have young kids or they're

thinking about starting a family.

461

:

For each of you, what would be your one

or two pieces of advice or recommendations

462

:

or resources that you would recommend to

them as they're considering this journey?

463

:

Asher: In terms of I think the, the,

the guiding light in how we approach

464

:

things is that Our attention is the

most valuable thing that they can have.

465

:

Regardless of how we're,

we're deploying that.

466

:

So just being, you know, sometimes

we may feel like a sounding board

467

:

when Silas is going off on the, you

know, some theorem that he's proving.

468

:

And we don't understand it, but

we're just there, you know, present.

469

:

And that's enough for, for him.

470

:

Or then for us, let's so, It's easy to say

like, Oh, you've read this list of, you

471

:

know, here's this list of specific things,

but like for, so because of their, they

472

:

sort of tend towards science and, and art.

473

:

We, we follow a lot of YouTubers

who are in in, in that vein.

474

:

So so there's probably a hundred channels

that we could, we could list there.

475

:

Elly: Yeah, that's just to say that there

are so many free resources out there to

476

:

teach your child about almost any topic.

477

:

And what I hear for, from most parents

who tend to agree that an individualized

478

:

education is probably the best that

they could provide for their child,

479

:

they just feel like they couldn't do it.

480

:

Because it feels like too much work

for them or too difficult, or they just

481

:

need to know all of these things that

they then impart on their children.

482

:

And that's simply not true.

483

:

There's so much out there

through the internet.

484

:

We really have access to the best

educational materials and there's no

485

:

need to be an expert in all fields

in order to provide your child with.

486

:

The best education that they can have

my advice would be that you can do it.

487

:

You don't need to have a degree.

488

:

You don't need to be a teacher.

489

:

We're both not teachers and maybe

a teacher would be able to give

490

:

our children a better education,

but it's, it's really good enough.

491

:

The, and

492

:

Asher: I would say that doing it now

is way easier than it's ever been.

493

:

There are new things, for example

You've probably talked about chatgbt

494

:

before on the show, but this is

like one of those things it's

495

:

a machine learning AI resource.

496

:

That is, is there's a free version of

it but it's something that the kids are

497

:

always using now you know, before bed,

they want to play with it, they want

498

:

to ask it questions about, you know,

Minecraft and things like that so they get

499

:

a sense of what it, what it can, what it

can do because they have domain knowledge

500

:

but that's a thing that they wouldn't

be, have access to if they were in a

501

:

school, they, they, I think it depends on

the school, but, but yeah, it basically

502

:

breaks most curriculums that are, Bye.

503

:

Geared towards testing because they

can answer, you know even tests to

504

:

get into law school like it's, it's

better at, at that sort of thing.

505

:

So it's sort of I think we

are moving into this era where

506

:

education is basically already free.

507

:

It's just people haven't realized that

they can, that it's up to them to decide

508

:

what, what resources to, to, to leverage.

509

:

But, but that requires the freedom

to make those choices and that's

510

:

the biggest, that's the hardest

511

:

Scott: step.

512

:

Yeah.

513

:

I mean, you're better to look, teach

them how to use the technology that's

514

:

coming then to try to like tell

them that, no, you can't use that.

515

:

And then they're, now they're

behind all the others that are out

516

:

there who do know how to use it.

517

:

Yeah.

518

:

I can attest, I, I mean, Tali did, I say

we homeschooled, she's the one that had

519

:

the hardest, the hardest job in, in this.

520

:

So, you know, I'm very.

521

:

We're very grateful that you're, you

guys have chosen to homeschool, it's hard

522

:

work, but I think it's, definitely worth

it and definitely grateful that you're

523

:

willing to even go further than that

to continue to try to organize things

524

:

like the homeschooling panel at TabConf.

525

:

So thank you guys for,

for continuing to do that.

526

:

So how is there anything else that you,

that I, that we missed that we want to get

527

:

to before I ask you how people can reach

out to you and how they can support you?

528

:

Elly: Come see us at TabConf next year.

529

:

Scott: And bring their kids,

and bring their kids, right?

530

:

Or their

531

:

Elly: spouse.

532

:

And bring your kids and spouse.

533

:

Asher: Yes.

534

:

Scott: All right.

535

:

So how do people reach you then?

536

:

What is it, so how do I find this cube?

537

:

If I wanted to ask you questions, is

it, is it, do you guys prefer Twitter or

538

:

Telegram, just kind of tell folks how,

how you prefer to be reached out to?

539

:

Elly: Twitter is a good way to reach us.

540

:

The cube.

541

:

It's found on Instagram, you can

put in a link, it's the Pembroke

542

:

Creative LLC on Instagram.

543

:

I'm Elly Pembroke on Twitter.

544

:

Asher: I'm Asher P.

545

:

on Twitter.

546

:

Elly: And we're usually pretty

responsive to direct messages.

547

:

Scott: Well thanks for being

available guys, Tali did you have

548

:

any final thoughts as we wrap up?

549

:

You ready to go back to Atlanta?

550

:

Tali: Well I'm just sitting

here thinking about ways of

551

:

reaching children of Bitcoiners.

552

:

In that room, you know, I don't know if

we need to conclude this, but I was like,

553

:

it would be really cool if we could have

children who have been through a few

554

:

years of homeschooling answer questions

maybe from the audience, , from the

555

:

parents were thinking about homeschooling.

556

:

Elly: Holly, you and I really think

like I next year I want to do a

557

:

homeschoolers panel where it's not the

parents that are on the panel, but it's

558

:

the children that are on the panel.

559

:

Tali: Yeah, I think that's

a really great idea.

560

:

And then and then another thought that I

had was if we, and it depends on the age

561

:

of the kids, right, because if they're

super young and they're coming in, then

562

:

that's, that's a one, that's one approach.

563

:

But when you're having middle school

kids come in or older, that's a

564

:

completely different approach.

565

:

But if we were to do something

like, like you already had some

566

:

version of it, which is if you

solve the puzzle, we send you SADS.

567

:

Yeah.

568

:

But if we did lessons, lesson games,

I guess, or games with lessons and

569

:

they earn SATs, then could we also set

up a table of trinkets and say, okay,

570

:

this trinket, you know, like a pretty

eraser or a sticker or a lollipop or

571

:

something cost, I don't know, 50 SATs,

and then they have to buy a trophy.

572

:

The trinket with the stats that

they just received so they can not

573

:

only receive, but also send like

that exercise might be kind of fun.

574

:

Yeah, just something like, you know,

M& M's or lollipop or something.

575

:

Scott: You guys are going to create a

circular economy in the next gen village.

576

:

Right, exactly.

577

:

Asher: There's a great Andy Schroeder

had, had this amazing demo of he

578

:

has this little bicycle that you

ride and, and you ride it for five

579

:

minutes and you earn about 10 stats.

580

:

Which is, is priced at basically what

an American home spend on electricity.

581

:

And it was a great way to like show how

cheap power has gotten, but you know,

582

:

you could take those SATs and then go

buy like a sticker at the next table.

583

:

So

584

:

Elly: cool.

585

:

Yeah.

586

:

We had things available for sale, but

that was more in the hundred K SATs range

587

:

so maybe something for less than that.

588

:

Would be, that's a great idea,

Tali, and a lot of Bitcoiners

589

:

did, are just starting families.

590

:

They're just having babies.

591

:

They really maybe need something

that even their babies would enjoy.

592

:

And we had teethers available for

sale, but we really need to think

593

:

more about how can we Support families

that are just starting out and

594

:

Scott: yeah.

595

:

All right, guys.

596

:

It's been a, it's been a pleasure.

597

:

For everybody listening,

reach out to these guys.

598

:

You have to check out this cube.

599

:

It's, it's very cool.

600

:

If nothing else, just to, to show off

to your friends, if you, even if you

601

:

don't feel like doing a, a 3d puzzle,

thank you guys so much for spending

602

:

some time with us and we can't wait

to see you guys again at whatever

603

:

the next meetup or conference is.

Links