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Thinking Like an Architect with Heidi Bolyard
Episode 4183rd November 2022 • Real Estate Investing with the REI Mastermind Network • REI Mastermind Network | Real Estate Investing
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Heidi Bolyard received her Bachelor’s Degree in Environmental Design and Architecture from Ball State University and an Associate’s Degree in both Construction Management and Art from Delta College. She is an architect and entrepreneur who is passionate about her clients. When designing homes Heidi’s main goal is to inspire her clients, nurture families, and create more happiness and joy in their lives. Heidi is passionate about creating gathering spaces for her clients to create memories they will cherish for a lifetime. 

She actively listens to each of her clients to figure out their life, goals, and their ultimate dream home. She is committed to maintaining a client-focused approach for each and every project so that every home becomes a conduit of happiness and love for every family.

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"You can invest 10,000 hours and become an expert or learn from those who have already made that investment." - Jack

Transcripts

::

Welcome to the REI Mastermind network where host Jack Haas gathers amazing stories from leaders in real estate investing.

::

In each episode, our guests will tell you what they're doing that works what they've tried that failed, and best of all, you'll learn actionable steps to take your real estate investing.

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To the next level now, here's Jack with another value packed episode.

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Heidi Bolyard is here with me tonight.

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Tidy, I appreciate you being here and we're going to be covering quite a bit of stuff associated with how to look at real estate from an architecture point of view.

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I've been looking forward to this idea.

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We're going to dive quite a bit into this, but before we get into it, I want to point.

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Everybody to your website because you're offering free download there. So go to soldbydesign.net.

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That's sold by design net, and I'll make sure to have that link in the show notes as always so you can always head over to REI mastermind.net for that. But Heidi, thanks for joining me here tonight.

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Thank you so much for having me.

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It's pretty impressive.

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You got quite a few degrees from Ball State University and there's a lot of background associated with this, but I'm always interested and.

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How you've found?

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Your way to this particular niche to help real estate investors and Realtors find this additional value.

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So as an architect, I had a client that was that's a real estate agent and she had me do some work to her home and then there was a couple clients that she was working with, and they were looking at older neighborhoods and they knew that any house that they picked in the neighborhoods that they were looking at would need a lot of work.

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So, a lot of early 20th century.

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Homes so really.

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Yeah, mature neighborhoods and they were from out of state and so she's hey, they're coming in.

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They have one day to see everything, figure out where they can go from the three houses that we've narrowed it.

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Down to and see what we can do with renovating them.

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So, walking through each of the holes with them and talking to them about the opportunities that.

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Were there or just?

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Issues that were just too much to probably make the.

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Home really work for them and their family.

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So, we're going to take it by a couple different approaches here, just based on what you just said there.

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First of all, we talked.

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About initially finding some additional opportunity that might be available to people past what is currently there.

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But those architectural issues that some investors may miss.

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So, let's start off with what people could possibly miss or what are some of those things that you've learned.

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Now, over time that they should probably look out for.

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That could cause some problems.

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Like a lot of things are just structural issues, like being able to go in and look at a structure and see look at where the cracks are at.

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Just like walk through an entire space of ground windows, look in the corners of the ceiling.

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If there's a basement going down.

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There looking at.

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The walls just looking at structural things like that.

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Looking for opportunities.

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There or where the bearing walls are.

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At opportunities to open.

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Up spaces so that.

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We can improve the flow of.

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My realtor laughs at me because I guess I'm one of the few guys that when I go look at a place with him, my first question is where's the basement?

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I go into the basement 1st and work my way up instead of.

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I guess what normal people.

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So, and then I get to get the upper.

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Yeah, it's like.

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The first floor.

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Hand, you know floor and then.

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The basement, but it just hurts.

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No sure.

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It's offensive from what the client or not 'cause otherwise.

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Yeah, good out of the basement after I've.

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Seen the 1st floor to look at structural.

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guy as well, so it gives me a:

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On something, he walked down the basement.

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Yeah, it'll get.

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Him and then before it has the chance.

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To get you, I'm quite a bit shorter, so it typically doesn't affect me, so I lead the way and then he fall.

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I don't know.

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I'm getting some basements that I've knocked my head on so.

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Gordon on the stair isn't.

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It being too tight.

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So, you said you start on the main floor first.

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What are you particularly interested in there?

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Just seeing the existing spaces, seeing where plumbing.

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Fixtures are at where things.

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Are more expensive to move as somebody.

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Looking to flip.

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A property like how?

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Can we as efficiently as possible?

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Move or rework spaces.

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So, what are you trying to look for?

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Are there certain things or elements that you that are of high value that you've learned that you're trying to maybe try?

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A position within the I.

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Think the ones they.

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Would do is looking.

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At what spaces are too big?

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We go into a.

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Lot of older.

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Homes and they have these massive living rooms and then also then the.

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Rest of the.

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Spaces in the home are much too small.

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So, it's looking.

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At the spaces that are in the home.

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So that we can rework.

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Things so that functions better and it flows better and then just looking at stasis too.

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'cause just because it's a formal dining room now doesn't mean it needs to remain a formal dining room.

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Dining room you mentioned buying those load bearing walls and a few other.

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You find that it's beneficial for somebody to come in with somebody like you that would have an idea of these items.

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Or can they be trained pretty quickly to identify like what a load bearing wall is and a few of these?

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Other yeah, the goal with.

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Creating the sold by Design Company was to try.

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Real estate agents or even yeah, your viewers.

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That are looking at single family.

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Homes, how they themselves could go through.

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A property in.

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We teach how to locate bearing walls and cracks to.

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Look for in the home and then also.

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Design skills as well just to our best practices.

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I've been in the.

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Industry for 21 years now, which is really hard to create.

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But looking at different things that we've done to host over those years to really improve how the home functions with minimal like additions to a.

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Home or even.

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Just working within that existing footprint of a home, which reduces the cost of renovating or adding on.

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We've been taught, told from the very beginning, that the biggest impact or the return on investment is kitchens and bathrooms.

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Would you say that's still the case?

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It is, yeah, I know a lot of people.

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So, though I've been really.

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Looking at outdoor living spaces.

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So, in the Midwest, of course.

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You can only use those so much.

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Through the year.

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But it's yeah, people have really started to love their outdoor living spaces to expand.

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The size of their home.

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You say outdoor living spaces, but it is that exterior curb appeal that really will get people out of the car and he actually in the house.

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We've really learned that lesson quite a few times.

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It's weird to watch because you'll have people drive up and then just leave because they don't want to even get out of the car.

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But you spend all this time on the inside.

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Of the house.

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And you neglect that exterior curb appeal.

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Right?

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So, the so that outside living area are they per glows or they just make.

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Yeah, pretty well like some people are.

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There's decent deck.

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What does that look like?

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Like putting in small little pool.

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Houses, so, especially if they don't have a basement.

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They're putting in a space like a pool house.

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So that they can.

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Basically, almost have a second like a bonus room space like space that even their kids can go and hang out.

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With their friends, but then a lot of fire pits or outdoor fireplaces we've seen everybody is putting in a pool these days.

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The spaces that are part of that.

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Outdoor living area.

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I think.

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You mentioned a couple times buying certain cracks, whether it's on in the foundation or in the ceiling in spots.

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What are some of those red flag cracks that you're referring to there?

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Round windows where you see Craig's come up from the corners or even in the ceiling any cracks that are coming down.

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Sometimes it's in the middle of a wall on an interior wall.

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If you're seeing some cracking in the ceiling in like the middle of a long interior wall.

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That's something to be.

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What is that typically a sign of this foundation?

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A shift?

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It's summer.

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In, if it's in the middle of a wall of an interior world, that means that whatever is above it is settling, which is the bearing below it is not supporting it.

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OK.

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So, and then in the basement, are there particular cracks that you're looking for or you'd want to avoid?

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Concrete block walls.

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Sometimes you see it a lot in corners just.

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Because oftentimes the gutters haven't been cleaned, so they're not draining properly or downspouts or not draining properly.

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You'll see actually like.

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Those you can just follow the block all the way down and it's cracked all the way down and sometimes it's falling into the space.

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A little bit.

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My part of the world is it's pretty common to have cracked walls in the basements and then we do a lot of bracing and stuff around here, so those horizontal cracks are typically something we can usually deal with, and it's those vertical.

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Cracks that are like.

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Man, that's digging out foundation and.

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That is a big project.

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You'll see it Boeing.

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Like a long wall Boeing into the space that's.

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Yeah, never did signing her.

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Yeah, I went to a house that this was a couple years ago, but the crack, the horizontal crack, was so big I could put my fist in it like it was.

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Right?

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Oh, it was pretty bad.

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That was a house.

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You were a property or walking.

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Car, yeah, I was walking through.

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We walked into the basement.

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I saw that.

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And I said, well, this is.

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That's enough of this.

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You know how much?

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Longer did you say no well?

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That that's one of the reasons I start in the basement you start from.

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Thanks son.

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The business works.

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It's time.

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Well-fed sometimes because we still have some.

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I never said that.

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Houses with fuses too, so it's fuse panel versus yeah, so that's a that's sometimes a big-ticket item if we.

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Have to go down.

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Well, yeah right here too and once you renovate too much, you're required to completely replace it all.

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Exactly, that's the same situation here, with all of that when you were we were talking about some of the best investments as the kitchen and the bathroom.

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What are some of those things that you've discovered that people may just miss?

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And maybe it's just gotten cliche.

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Now we go automatically to the white cabinets and.

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Just throw them in real estate investors aren't exactly on the cusp.

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Of any.

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Kind of trend that might be in the.

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Marketplace right now.

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Constituents, interior designers make a lot of interior designers are putting in like colored cabinets now which is pretty cool.

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I've seen some amazing kitchens with colored cabinets, but I see so a ton of white cabinets I see people doing like entire.

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White spaces, white walls.

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White cabinets what?

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Oh, really white countertop.

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Like to me that's it's a little sterile for me.

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Is the open kitchen concepts we're talking about removing walls though.

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It is, but what I see a lot of people doing is putting in really big pantries, so they're putting in pantries that have a countertop in them.

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Sometimes even a sink or a refrigerator.

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Sometimes a second oven, but then also.

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Space in there to put all their appliances like put their blender and their toaster, nor kinnow burner.

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And all of those things to keep their kitchen counters clean so.

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It's almost it's basically a like their messy kitchen, so they have that area that has everything to prep in and then they have their.

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Nice kitchen for entertaining.

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That's interesting, so you're probably talking or working with a lot more higher end.

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Houses that would have something like that going.

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On we are, yeah, but often too. Like even smaller homes like we renovated a condo not so long ago and it had back-to-back like 3-foot-wide closets in the one closets like.

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Right?

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To the kitchen.

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So even with that and we were just like what if we.

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Made it a pantry.

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'cause the kitchen wasn't that large in the condo.

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So, we even put like a counter space in there and they put in there all air fryer convection oven toaster.

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Machine and then they put their blender in there.

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So just to.

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Still keep some of that out of the kitchen and then just having a really organized space with.

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Labeled bins and shelves so that it's yeah, a really functional space.

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Even though it's only a 3-foot-wide pantry so.

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You can do a lot of things; you just start to think outside of the box of opportunities and possibilities.

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Just to remind everybody, go to soldbydesign.net for that free download and some additional information on Heidi and her team.

::

But Heidi, I would imagine one of the things that struck me here is that based on some of the things that you're talking about.

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When we are investors, we go look at a property, whether it's off of the mills or directly from the seller.

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Sometimes our numbers we can't get to what the seller is looking for out of it, but based on what you're talking about with additions, removing walls, changing out the flow, I would guess that there.

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Is a way.

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To maybe justify some of those higher numbers, and because you're essentially creating some additional margin, do you have?

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Do you show people how to run those calculations?

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Not run the calculations, but just help them think through spaces.

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I've worked on a lot of homes where people thought they were going to add a bunch of space to the.

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Home which doesn't.

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Function we need to add this, and we need to add a mud room and 1/2-bathroom and.

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Like a family room and like all of the space.

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But as we walked through.

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The house it was just like.

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What if we used?

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This massive dining room to use portion of that for like mud room and 1/2 bathroom and then really on that on.

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The only thing that they added was.

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A front porch in a in a back porch off.

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That new mud room so just.

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Thinking a little bit differently, really what the needs are for the project, like what they're looking to accomplish with that home that they're purchasing or looking to flip or looking to have as an investment property.

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Like really finding what they want that home to be.

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And maybe the renovations that they need to do to that home are a lot less.

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Then that they have in mind.

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And when you're making these type of decisions, are you looking at like the comparables in the neighborhood?

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What's going on in the city national trends?

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What information are you devise people to use to make these types of decisions when it comes to some of these changes that you're referring to are quite large.

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They are and so it's just.

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It just depends on.

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What, yeah, you're looking to do to the.

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Home so we.

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Don't get into numbers and things like that with our clients or architecture quiets, but the areas that they're looking at I'm based out of Columbus, OH.

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I oh.

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Yeah, the neighborhoods that.

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We work in.

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The property values are constantly.

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Rising rent fortunate location.

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To do.

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I'm just curious in your part of the world.

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Typically train Realtors are they houses that are about to go on the market?

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Does the realtor engage you or you train the Realtors to spot these things and make these suggestions?

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Are the sellers willing to make these type of updates or?

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Yeah, first.

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Normally if a real estate agent brings me into walk through properties with their clients, their clients are already looking to.

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So, make updates to a home with the program sold by design.

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Teaching real estate agents how they can help their clients walk into a home and really see how it would align with their lifestyle.

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So, I teach them based the process that I use for renovating a home or an addition or custom home.

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That entire process of meeting with the Korean, finding out their goals.

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And their needs and their dreams, so that when they're when they're looking for a home for their client, they really understand the client so that they can find that perfect dream home for them.

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And you're essentially saying, let's take this home and make it the dream home they're looking at.

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So yeah.

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And a lot of.

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Homes could really be somebody's dream home if a few things were shifted.

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But often a lot of people.

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They'll walk into a space.

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And if it's currently being used as a dining room, they oftentimes struggle with looking at that space of.

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What it could?

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So, these are L.

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But they're looking for two offices and they're not looking for formal spaces.

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They're looking for more open spaces within a home then that gives you the opportunity they're walking a real estate agent to walk in and look at those spaces and see where could the two office spaces be, even though they're not being used.

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His office space is now and then also looking at what teaching where bearing walls are located at looking and seeing.

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Is this comb potentially able to open up some rules pretty efficiently and?

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So that it could.

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Have improved the flow of the space.

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So, do you find the Realtors that are on your program then are they having some success training the buyers in this regard?

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Because I just mentioned earlier that we have people who sometimes won't even?

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Get out of the car.

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Yeah, a little, you know.

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Just based on the exterior appearance.

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So, to get that beyond that and to envision what it could be a challenge, I'd imagine.

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For everything.

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Yeah, the one thing I teach my real estate agent.

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So, I was like you have to go to their home.

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You have to.

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Be in their space.

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Need to walk through.

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It you need to see what they like.

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About it, what they don't like about it?

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What works, what doesn't work.

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Just because then to their clients thinking in a different mindset because their clients now thinking what like this.

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This real estate agents just asked me so many more questions than the normal surface level questions.

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The real.

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Estate agent asks me so.

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Really, you know?

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That the client feels heard and then they just.

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They feel like.

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The real estate agent hat brings a lot more value to them.

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So, they trust the real estate agent.

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So, if they are going to home, they're.

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Going to walk.

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Through it because.

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They know that.

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The real estate agent's looking for opportunities.

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For them to make that before that home to be their dream.

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Home, yeah, I'd imagine that this really changes the workflow when it comes to certain real estate agents then because for investors.

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For that matter.

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Because you're then showing only those properties that you think could be that potential fit based on changes likely to the property versus.

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I find a lot of realtors and investors.

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It's more of a shotgun effect.

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We're just taking you from one house to the next.

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Yeah, and your G blow a whole day just looking.

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At house after house.

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Right?

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Yeah, so it's really signing those.

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The opportunities that are there that align best.

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With their goals.

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But yeah, if you.

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Take that hour like.

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Walking through the clients' existing home and really seeing what's going.

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To work like what?

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They're looking for in a new home why they're moving from the home that they're in.

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Like you're not going to blow an entire day going house to house like you're going to know exactly what they're looking for on a much deeper level so you can select those homes that really are going to align with what they're looking for and walk them through them those homes.

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So, it's really.

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It also saves the real estate agents I work with that saves them a lot of time and it saves them a lot of money if they work, walk into a home with their client and they get to the basement and they're like homes 30 years old.

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The furnace has never been replaced.

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Water heaters never been replaced.

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The AC condenser has never been replaced.

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Windows have never been replaced.

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That's really big-ticket items.

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If you're going to have to replace all of those things within a home instead of having the client being like I want, you to put together an offer.

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For this home.

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Being like just so you know, all of these replacement costs are going to come up soon and I'm sure the.

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Inspector is going to bring them up as well.

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And then you're going to have.

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Paid several $100 for.

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An inspector, but you still need to.

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Have an inspector.

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I'm not saying that my.

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Program like eliminate your need.

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Your clients need to have an inspector come and.

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Walk through the.

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Home, you know it.

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Gives you more knowledge so that when you're walking through a space with your client, like.

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You could help them.

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Make a better-informed decision about if they.

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Want to put an offer in?

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It's funny you bring up an inspector because we actually before we start a fix and flip or times or not.

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Now we send in an inspector before we begin the work.

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And then we use that to build the list of what we're going to tackle, just so that we have an idea as to what the inspector might see that, and we've had a lot of experience, but we just don't assume that we're going to catch.

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Everything, yeah.

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No, that's very wise.

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It's such a minimal cost I'm not.

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I'm surprised that more people don't actually.

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Do it, but.

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Yeah, well, I know with the recent market like people haven't been doing inspections just because they were waving, and I know at least in our area of Ohio they're waiving inspections just because if they don't, they're going to lose out on the House, which is.

::

Crazy to me.

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Yeah, our market has slowed way down like houses are staying on the market a lot longer.

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People are taking their time and frankly there's a generation of first-time homebuyer buyers who aren't used to these interest rates.

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And they're actually still not that bad, but really not.

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That's not that bad.

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But yeah, if they don't have that experience, a new world for them.

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It adds, it ends right the 2% gap.

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Yeah, exactly, we're long as we're.

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Not to the 15%, so we're good.

::

So, outside of what we've talked about here are is there any like low hanging fruit of changes, architectural changes that could be had in a property to make huge returns or benefit?

::

I think the one thing is it's just looking for flow within a property, like is the storage space.

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I know a lot of people wants their storage space, so find creating that really efficient storage space like even if you're flipping a property finding.

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Even if it's.

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A door walking into the family room, but it's.

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Like the main door.

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Like off the garage or something like that.

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Creating like a mud room.

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Type space like, even if it's just some hooks.

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On the wall and.

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In a bench that you can, that has a couple cubbies underneath it just so you can create some storage just when you're walking in the door.

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To keep some things organized.

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Yeah, that's a good idea, just.

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I talk a.

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Lot about how clutter creates chaos, so finding ways to just use the space create organized storage.

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Things like that just makes a home flow.

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I hate to tie this to the to this, but it actually is the case for us when we are wholesaling a property, we will typically at least send a cleaning crew through it and get all of the junk out.

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Get it as clean as it can be before we open it up to other investors to take a look at and because that like you said that clutter.

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You don't create chaos in.

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Yeah, mind can't focus.

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You're just looking at all of the trash.

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Trash or stuff everywhere.

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Depends how much you're cleaners having to clean out of there, but.

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I've been in some.

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Spaces with lots of stuff, but yeah.

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Now with hoarders it's it is a thing.

::

Great thanks and you know what can be worked.

::

With it completely.

::

It changes their vision.

::

That's the space.

::

Heidi, this has been a great conversation.

::

I forgot to warn you that I do this, but at the end of the conversation I usually have some rapid-fire questions.

::

If you wanted to give them a try, OK, OK, let's go.

::

So, in your case you can alter this question.

::

I usually ask if there's a real estate investing myth you'd like to bust.

::

But I guess that there is like maybe anarchy.

::

Fact myth you'd like to bust or just a business myth you'd like to bust.

::

I bring it up because as investors were really used to seeing those late-night programs, infomercials saying it's a rich.

::

Get rich quick content.

::

Yeah, it's not a get rich quick thing.

::

Yeah, I had something then I just lost it.

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Yeah, I'm sure.

::

No, that's OK.

::

Yeah, the only.

::

Thing they want screen is I hear all the time.

::

Oh, I want.

::

To be an architect.

::

One day

::

Or when I'm younger all the time.

::

I wouldn't be surprised.

::

Did you get that more during Seinfeld?

::

George Costanza.

::

Wanted to be.

::

He kept pretending he was an architect.

::

I often have people call me George Costanza.

::

Mike works at.

::

Vandelay Industries yes so.

::

So what?

::

You're not allowed to say.

::

Rich Dad, poor dad.

::

I'm just tired of hearing.

::

It, although it's.

::

A great book, but.

::

Is there a book that you're reading right now, or one that you would recommend?

::

A great book that I'd recommend is seller be sold by Grant Cardone.

::

OK, bye.

::

OK cool.

::

What was the biggest business mistake you've made and what?

::

Did you learn from it?

::

Biggest I think the.

::

Biggest thing is it's not growing as quickly as I could, like not trusting myself to grow the company as quickly as I should have grown at.

::

Like the architecture firm.

::

So, I've had my firm for 14 years.

::

That's a pretty consistent response.

::

I hear that quite a bit is that they feel most people feel that they can.

::

They could have moved faster.

::

What do you think caused the slow progress?

::

There was an analysis paralysis, being unsure.

::

Yeah, I think part of its analysis paralysis, it's architecture.

::

Firms and constructions he stabbed in full ebb and.

::

Flow of the economy.

::

So just.

::

With that was going to hire.

::

More and then COVID hit and then just.

::

Right?

::

Yeah, things like that.

::

And now it's just we still do we?

::

Hire more or do we wait but we're.

::

Also in Columbus, OH.

::

We just got that.

::

Huge Intel.

::

Project cell well sure.

::

We don't see any slowing down here.

::

Yeah, it's it always surprises.

::

People when I tell them.

::

I'm near Fargo, ND, and you probably heard it in my accent again, but we've we keep getting all of these big developments as well. Doctors, big campus here. Amazon just built a huge facility.

::

Here you know it just keeps compounding, so it's drawing in more and more people.

::

Oh wow, yeah.

::

Yeah, we're getting a.

::

New Amazon facility here too.

::

I heard I didn't realize that.

::

If you could.

::

Go back in time and give your younger self one piece of advice.

::

What would.

::

That be.

::

Don't worry what other people think about you.

::

Just focus on what you are doing and what your goals are and keep moving forward.

::

Boy, that that's a great piece of advice.

::

It's really easier said than done, isn't it, yeah.

::

I think too.

::

With being in in investing, it's sometimes I know people are like why you run a business, like why don't you work for somebody else.

::

It's the same thing with investments and things like.

::

That too, it's like, why do?

::

You do this.

::

They don't really.

::

Understand what we do is.

::

Working for ourselves and building.

::

You know those people that are in those type of jobs too and who are seeing those?

::

Type of things.

::

To be frank, they're not as secure as they think they.

::

Are now and that's.

::

Just block them out and keep focusing on.

::

What we're doing.

::

It's not.

::

Right?

::

Heidi just one last time sold bydesign.net take advantage of the free download there but ID is there a question?

::

Our concept you wish we would have covered here today.

::

I don't think so.

::

I think that.

::

We did a great job of.

::

Going over everything.

::

Yes, amazing questions.

::

I appreciate you being on, and I hope you'll consider coming back again sometime.

::

Absolutely thank you so much for having me.

::

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::

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