Artwork for podcast Hip Hop Movie Club
Why is Wild Style required viewing for hip-hop fans? (With Andrew "DJ ARM 18" McIntosh)
Episode 5331st January 2024 • Hip Hop Movie Club • Hip Hop Movie Club
00:00:00 00:25:30

Share Episode

Shownotes

Hip Hop Movie Club and Andrew "DJ ARM 18" McIntosh discuss last week's magical ArtsQuest event celebrating Wild Style at SteelStacks in Bethlehem PA . It was a blessing to be in the building for this action-packed night that featured:

  • a screening of Wild Style (1982)
  • a panel discussion with director Charlie Ahearn, Grandmaster Caz of the Cold Crush Brothers, and GrandMixer DXT
  • a DJ set by DXT
  • a performance by the Cold Crush

Topics discussed:

  • Bringing Wild Style to ArtsQuest
  • The cultural significance of Wild Style
  • Comparison with Beat Street and Breakin'
  • The impact of Cold Crush Brothers
  • Has the Cold Crush received their flowers?
  • Upcoming events

Also check out:

Our original episodes on Wild Style, Beat Street, and Breakin'.

The Hip Hop Years and VH-1's NY77: The Coolest Year in Hell

Hip Hop Movie Club will be back with ARM at SteelStacks to host a screening of Juice on February 28 (and Krush Groove in March).

Check out ARM's 50 Years Down the Line site for more events, including "Fresh Dressed Like a Million Bucks" on February 24 and a conversation with Chuck D of Public Enemy on April 16.

Credits

Hip Hop Movie Club is produced by your HHMCs JB, BooGie, and DynoWright. Theme music by BooGie. Follow @hiphopmovieclub on Instagram!

Transcripts

Speaker:

Welcome to Hip Hop Movie Club, the show

that harmonizes the rhythm of hip hop with

2

:

the magic of movies.

3

:

50 episodes ago, we here at the Hip Hop

Movie Club reviewed the first ever hip hop

4

:

film, Wild Style.

5

:

And last week, the Hip Hop Movie Club

received a blessing that was completely

6

:

inconceivable when we reviewed this film

nearly two years ago.

7

:

We met the director Charlie Ahearn, Grand

Mixer DXT, and the Cold Crush Brothers at

8

:

a special screening, panel discussion, and

performance at ArtsQuest.

9

:

Bethlehem PA.

10

:

Coming up, we have the man responsible for

bringing this event to life, Andrew

11

:

McIntosh, aka DJ ARM 18.

12

:

We're three old heads who put their old

heads together to vibe on these films for

13

:

you.

14

:

I'm DynoWright, filmmaker, longtime

hip-hop fan, and I can't believe I dapped

15

:

up Grand Mixer DXT the man who turntabled

on Herbie Hancock's "Rockit".

16

:

I'm JB, 80s and 90s nostalgia junkie, long

time hip hop fan, and I'm equal parts

17

:

fresh fly wild and bold.

18

:

Yes, I can attest to that.

19

:

I'm BooGie, a DJ, long time hip hop head.

20

:

And I wish that every night was like the

one we were about to talk about.

21

:

Today on the show, ARM will tell us why

Wild Style is required viewing for all

22

:

hip-hop fans and we'll give you five more

takeaways from this important film and

23

:

screening.

24

:

How this event came to be, the cultural

significance of Wild Style, how it

25

:

compares with Beat Street and Breakin',

the impact of the Cold Crush Brothers, and

26

:

whether the Cold Crush truly got its

flowers.

27

:

All right, so welcome ARM 18, Andrew

McIntosh.

28

:

Thank you so much for bringing this

special event to the masses, at least to

29

:

Lehigh Valley.

30

:

And first question I have for you, why

were you inspired to bring Charlie and the

31

:

Cold Crush Brothers to ArtsQuest?

32

:

What inspired you?

33

:

There's actually a long backstory to this,

and I'll try to be as concise as possible.

34

:

I was very fortunate in coming up in the

90s to have run with some heads that came

35

:

from the city who were graffiti writers

themselves, and they were fellow college

36

:

students of mine.

37

:

They go by JERE from DMS out of Queens and

the late Chase from ST7 Staten Island.

38

:

and they put together something called the

Raw Arts Symposium.

39

:

And this was a weekend long event, I would

say 96 this happened.

40

:

And it was an incredible sort of mixing

and matching of bringing graffiti artists

41

:

up to the Bard College campus in upstate

New York, where we had REVS, COST, Lady

42

:

Pink, and another artist I can't quite

remember.

43

:

and they kicked it off with a party.

44

:

Like, right, we did a party out in the

middle of the woods, highly illegal or

45

:

whatever, and I was DJing it, it was

great.

46

:

And then the next day, the artists came

and they did installations, they did live

47

:

installations, right, of their graffiti

art while I was DJing.

48

:

And so the campus is like coming down to,

it's like this watch party of graffiti

49

:

being happening.

50

:

And then it was followed up with like this

long panel in one of our auditoriums where

51

:

they talked to the graffiti artists about

their work.

52

:

And then of course there was a party.

53

:

Like it was like, I did three parties in

like 24 hours.

54

:

It was like, I loved it.

55

:

And then I think the final day there was a

showing of Wild Style, right?

56

:

That was like the end.

57

:

Cause like my man Chase Malcolm said to

me, like when I showed up at Bard as a

58

:

freshman, he was like,

59

:

Have you ever seen Wild Style?

60

:

And I was like, I've heard of it.

61

:

And he was like, you haven't seen it?

62

:

I was like, no.

63

:

And he was like, he said, it's a rite of

passage, B.

64

:

Like you just got, you gotta see it.

65

:

And that phrase, rite of passage always

stuck with me.

66

:

And so when I finally got my hand on a VHS

copy and I was blown away by it, I kept

67

:

rewinding the scenes with Grandmaster

Flash over and over again, cause I was

68

:

learning.

69

:

It was the first time I could really watch

a DJ cut a record.

70

:

But that's when Wild Style was sort of was

injected into me.

71

:

And I've always kept the Raw Arts

Symposium like in the back of my mind is

72

:

like, I wanna do something like that.

73

:

That was an incredible weekend of

celebration, of art being made, like, you

74

:

know, real time.

75

:

And then also just this, you know, taking

in and showing of Wild Style.

76

:

And so that's where it got its start.

77

:

you know, many, many moons ago.

78

:

And I got this opportunity this, this year

in the celebrating a 50 years of hip hop

79

:

at Northampton Community College in

Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, to put on a

80

:

variety of events.

81

:

And this is, this is one of the key, like,

you know, uh, key events that we're doing

82

:

this year.

83

:

We did, worked with a lot of regional

artists in the fall.

84

:

Uh, BooGie came to one in Stroudsburg PA,

like, you know, we've, we've had, uh, and

85

:

also in Bethlehem, right?

86

:

Uh, we've had a lot of good work with

local graffiti artists, local DJs, local

87

:

rappers, entrepreneurs, et cetera.

88

:

But the Wild Style kicking off 2024, you

know, the showing of Wild Style at steel

89

:

stacks in Bethlehem, PA, that was going to

be our first big signature event.

90

:

And so I was like, how do we, you know, we

got to get Charlie there.

91

:

How can we get Charlie there?

92

:

Uh, I was fortunate to have a friend from

Bard who has worked with Charlie on

93

:

in some of his other movies who put me in

touch with him.

94

:

And I kind of had in the back of my mind,

Charlie was gonna be the key that opens

95

:

doors.

96

:

I had met him at Cornell University of 10

years ago at the 30th anniversary of Wild

97

:

Style.

98

:

And I saw how all the performers and

artists from that movie, Charlie's their

99

:

dude.

100

:

Like that they'll ride for him, you know.

101

:

They have a lot of respect and love for

him because he put them on and gave them

102

:

this opportunity.

103

:

And so once I secured Charlie, I then

started calling around to artists and

104

:

said, listen, I'm working with Charlie

Ahearn and he's coming out.

105

:

Like, are you willing to come out?

106

:

And we've got Cold Crush.

107

:

And I would say, I want to be clear, like

Cold Crush was, they were down and

108

:

enthusiastic from day one.

109

:

Like once I got a hold of them and, and

their manager, Cora Brown, a big shout to

110

:

her.

111

:

She was at different times.

112

:

It was like, Andrew, you sound so nervous.

113

:

This is going to work out just because

it's okay.

114

:

And she really held my hand.

115

:

through a lot of the planning and

organization and contacting people, and

116

:

then finally acquiring GrandMixer DXT as

well, to be a DJ component, you know, and

117

:

represented at the event.

118

:

So that's from soup to nuts, from the

first time I experienced Wild Style to

119

:

what we experienced this last weekend,

that's how it all came together.

120

:

It's an amazing backstory.

121

:

backstory.

122

:

Nice.

123

:

Awesome.

124

:

Yeah, and it was a smashing success.

125

:

I was telling these guys, I was like, man,

this event deserves mass media.

126

:

So we'll be the media right now to try to

bring it a little bit out to the masses

127

:

because it did get picked up by Rock the

Bells Instagram.

128

:

You saw that Rock the Bells had some

footage that they obtained and put it out

129

:

there.

130

:

They have one point one million followers.

131

:

That's amazing.

132

:

So.

133

:

It's big time.

134

:

Yeah, I love how Rock the Bells supports

artists like Cold Crush.

135

:

You know, that's crucial.

136

:

It's amazing, yeah.

137

:

And actually I was at the Rock the Bells

Festival in Queens in the summer and

138

:

Grandmaster Caz and Cold Crush were one of

the opening acts.

139

:

He had that jacket all blinged out from

Rock the Bells at the event if you saw him

140

:

afterwards.

141

:

So next question I have is, and you kind

of touched upon this a little bit, but

142

:

what is the cultural significance of the

movie Wild Style?

143

:

You know, in addition to it being like

every, you know, B-boys rite of passage, I

144

:

would say the thing that I believe was

discussed during the panel discussion,

145

:

what I would say in my classroom is that

what you're seeing in Wild Style is the

146

:

moment.

147

:

It's a fictional movie, but everybody

who's playing a part in that movie was

148

:

down with the hip hop scene since day one.

149

:

So what you're seeing is the moment in

which

150

:

In my mind, I'll say the old school became

the new school where hip hop moved from

151

:

uptown to downtown.

152

:

The whole movie, if you think about it, if

you think about Zoro and the character of

153

:

Zoro, imagine Zoro representing not just

graffiti, but all of hip hop.

154

:

Zoro represents like the whole struggle

these performers and artists are having

155

:

with, wait, I've got opportunity on one

hand, but then there's keeping it real on

156

:

the other.

157

:

How can I, how do I manage these things?

158

:

How can I make some money but not get

ripped off, right?

159

:

How can I do my art but it still have

integrity?

160

:

And that's a huge question for hip hop at

that moment, right?

161

:

And all that energy is in Wild Style, like

that tension in my mind of like, this is

162

:

no longer just a folksy grassroots, you

know, rough around the edges, like you

163

:

have to be there.

164

:

musical performance movement, it's about

to blow up.

165

:

Right.

166

:

And that's what Wild Style captures.

167

:

It's just that, that it's like, it's, it's

like when a bomb drops and it's like

168

:

silent and then it like blows, like it's

like that moment and everybody who's in

169

:

it, they were there.

170

:

There's no Hollywood actors, et cetera.

171

:

So they're getting a platform to sort of

replicate and showcase what they did in

172

:

the Bronx for 10 years.

173

:

right there for you on screen.

174

:

You know what's funny is it's so well

ahead of its time.

175

:

I put it out there and you see that the

riches that could come from it, like they

176

:

had the car, the limo, they got the

ladies, the party lifestyle.

177

:

And it's like, wow, fast forward and then

look at all the music videos that we've

178

:

seen in the past couple of decades.

179

:

And that just got amplified exponentially.

180

:

Yeah.

181

:

And I mean, it's an interesting thing,

right?

182

:

We witnessed a little bit of in the Q&A

between, you know, Caz and DXT and Charlie

183

:

and myself, a little bit of the tension

that exists in the purpose of hip hop,

184

:

right?

185

:

Like what is it, you know, is it for a

party or is it to speak upon why hip hop

186

:

is the way that it is, right?

187

:

Like hip hop is the way that it is because

it's coming from these, you know, from a

188

:

particular community.

189

:

The Bronx was...

190

:

utterly abandoned in the 1960s and 70s and

was a shelled out like, you know, war zone

191

:

in the way that there was virtually no

civil services and arson was rampant and

192

:

et cetera.

193

:

And out of this comes these kids making a

name for themselves, right?

194

:

And so there's this great story of

triumph, but there's also this opportunity

195

:

to talk about the grant, like great

inequities that exist in our society.

196

:

And I think what we saw a little bit

between DXT and Caz was like,

197

:

Well, are we here to celebrate Wild Style

or are we here to like, you know, really

198

:

kind of break it down, you know?

199

:

And it was me as an educator, I thought

that was wonderful because we as an

200

:

audience got to witness, well, hip hop's

both of those things.

201

:

It doesn't have to be an either or, you

know?

202

:

Right?

203

:

And so it was kind of a key moment.

204

:

You're absolutely right, JB.

205

:

It's like...

206

:

Wild Style embodies all the elements of a

party and a good time that we know hip hop

207

:

to be about and to celebrate, but it's

also, it doesn't turn away from the fact

208

:

that the Bronx was utterly dangerous place

to live and to dwell and to try to create

209

:

this art.

210

:

Yeah, there was a stick-up scene and

everything.

211

:

It was dangerous.

212

:

Next question I had was, if you could do

us a favor, compare Wild Style with some

213

:

of the other more popular hip-hop-themed

movies that would soon follow, such as

214

:

Beat Street and Breakin'.

215

:

Yeah, I mean, listen, as a kid living out

in Pennsylvania, I saw Beat Street and

216

:

Breakin' like long before Wild Style,

right, because why?

217

:

They had the distribute, you know, what I

understand now is they had the

218

:

distribution, they had the Hollywood

reach, et cetera.

219

:

And those movies have a certain virtue in

their own right, but they are, they sort

220

:

of take a look at the template that Wild

Style provided, and they essentially

221

:

appropriate it, you know?

222

:

I would argue that Beat Street's a little

more effective than Breakin', you know?

223

:

And once you get to Breakin 2, Electric

Boogaloo, it's like, you know, it's

224

:

laughable.

225

:

It's more just entertainment, if anything.

226

:

It seems pretty removed from the whole

thing that hip hop is about.

227

:

But Beat Street, you know, it's a similar

story, right?

228

:

trying to make a name for themselves, et

cetera.

229

:

The difference is, it's just, at different

times, unless it's the Rock Steady Crew in

230

:

it, like a lot of the party scenes are mad

stiff and like, you know what I mean?

231

:

They're very, it's obviously scripted and

maybe a little bit better acted.

232

:

But at times it comes off in my mind as

contrived.

233

:

Those movies come off in a way that isn't.

234

:

feels wholly authentic, you know?

235

:

Yeah, definitely you see the Hollywood

sheen on Beat Street and Breakin' for

236

:

sure.

237

:

Whereas Wild Style is raw, uncut.

238

:

Some of those rap scenes go on for like

15, 20 minutes in Wild Style.

239

:

And I'm just loving it.

240

:

And it's just like, you're at a concert.

241

:

It literally puts you, puts you there.

242

:

Yeah.

243

:

Straight lyrics, no hook.

244

:

Hahaha

245

:

So we had the great pleasure to meet the

Cold Crush Brothers, thanks to you.

246

:

And how much credit do you feel the Cold

Crush Brothers deserve as hip hop

247

:

trailblazers?

248

:

Um, you know, it's not just me.

249

:

I mean, earlier, I think within the last

hour on January 30th here, uh, DJ Doo Wop,

250

:

right?

251

:

Um, uh, great mixtape king at, uh, out of

New York in the:

252

:

A lot of greatest rappers of all time.

253

:

Oh, their entire careers to Grandmaster

Caz, you know, and I'm like, Wow.

254

:

Okay.

255

:

I guess we're vibing the same way right

now.

256

:

Me and Wop like you, you are, you're

correct.

257

:

JB, like the, the Cold Crush as a, as a

unit and then

258

:

and then Caz is their leader.

259

:

I was talking to their manager and I'm

like, you know what, people talk about

260

:

raising the bar and it's Cold Crush.

261

:

They are the bar.

262

:

You know what I mean?

263

:

That's what you need to aim for.

264

:

I think what we witnessed in person, in my

mind, that is so extraordinary is four

265

:

individuals with a DJ Ultimate, their DJ,

who

266

:

you know, stands in for Tony Tone, their

original DJ, they are, are rapping in

267

:

unison for 30 plus minutes.

268

:

I mean, there's, there's not one

microphone feedback.

269

:

There's not one missed line.

270

:

There's not one like pause where they're

able to exchange verses or rap or sing in

271

:

unison while a DJ is cutting up the beat

or dropping the beat.

272

:

You know, there's no, there's no DAT.

273

:

There's no pre-programmed.

274

:

It's just five individuals who have these

routines, you know, or you could sit here

275

:

and say, well, it's been 40 years.

276

:

Of course it's mastered.

277

:

But if you go back and listen to tapes,

they're on YouTube.

278

:

They were rhyming like that back in the

day.

279

:

They, they practice that hard back in the

day.

280

:

They invented rap.

281

:

Like there was rapping before this.

282

:

This is what I always try to say in my

classroom.

283

:

Like Isaac Hayes rapped, you know, James

Brown rapped King heroin, like.

284

:

Millie Jackson rapped, like all sorts of

people rapped and rhymed.

285

:

That was that's a part of the

African-American, you know, expression,

286

:

right, like preach, you know, Black

preachers.

287

:

They're basically rapping from the pulpit.

288

:

But what Cold Crush did and, you know,

people like Melle Mel and the Furious Five

289

:

and others.

290

:

But what Caz and them did was they were

like, you know what?

291

:

Rapping is not just like a novelty.

292

:

It's not a joke.

293

:

It's not like a game.

294

:

Like I'm a performer.

295

:

Right.

296

:

And you see how they modeled themselves

after Motown groups, right?

297

:

You got the - Yeah.

298

:

Right.

299

:

I knew it.

300

:

I was going, I was going there.

301

:

When I saw that in person, like the way

that they're playing off each other, like

302

:

the Temptations, like the Four Tops, and

I'm like, oh my God, I get it now.

303

:

I get it because that makes sense because

that's who they grew up on.

304

:

That's who they grew up on.

305

:

And they're like, you know, we're going to

be that, but the hip hop version of it.

306

:

So that's, that's to me, you know, the,

the real legacy of the Cold Crush

307

:

brothers, they're one of the, you know,

308

:

I don't know what the exact number is.

309

:

I'm gonna say a dozen, okay?

310

:

Like give or take, give or take a couple,

but of groups that have just set the

311

:

standard of what rap, like what rapping

could be as a musical, like art form, you

312

:

know?

313

:

And they made it out a whole cloth.

314

:

Nothing, you know, it didn't exist before

then.

315

:

It's amazing in that regard.

316

:

And then let's, I didn't get a chance to

say it in the, in the panel.

317

:

I would like to say it here.

318

:

Grandmaster Caz is the author of the

number one, the first rap commercial hit,

319

:

Rapper's Delight, Sugarhill Gang.

320

:

And you could go find video of Caz talking

about it.

321

:

The Hip Hop Years is one of the

documentaries where he comes out and

322

:

explains what happened.

323

:

I won't go into it here, but he didn't get

that credit when it happened.

324

:

So, Sugarhill Gang drops Rapper's Delight

and they become a household name, but

325

:

those are Caz's rhymes.

326

:

So the record that helped hip hop music

cross over throughout the United States

327

:

and throughout the world, that's

Grandmaster Caz, you know?

328

:

And I think that's another big piece of

his legacy.

329

:

That was huge.

330

:

I had heard a lot of that story.

331

:

So yeah, I definitely was aware of that.

332

:

So that being said, you know,

unfortunately these guys, they never

333

:

really got that record deal and they

talked about that at the panel.

334

:

Now in your opinion, do you feel that the

Cold Crush Brothers have sufficiently

335

:

received their flowers yet for their

contributions to hip hop?

336

:

In I do I do you know, but I think that's

a part of the work that I was trying to do

337

:

was that Okay, you go on Sirius XM radio

and Caz is on there, right?

338

:

You you can't you can't look at many

documentaries that are about the

339

:

development of the culture and Cold Crush

and Caz aren't referenced Or interviewed

340

:

like Caz is a great interview, right?

341

:

So he's in You know, he's in uh, I highly

recommend uh VH-1's

342

:

NY77: The Year from Hell, which is about

the year:

343

:

Caz is all in that and you get to hear

about how he started as a DJ before he

344

:

became a performer.

345

:

It's, it's great.

346

:

And I do think that they've gotten a

certain amount of acknowledgement, right.

347

:

But that said, that's why we do the events

we do out in Eastern PA, because I'm going

348

:

to assume there were a lot of people there

that was watching Wild Style for the first

349

:

time.

350

:

That was their first rite of passage.

351

:

That was, you know,

352

:

They'd never seen a group like Cold Crush

perform in person.

353

:

And so I think they, as long as our

legends are here, they should get that

354

:

platform.

355

:

We should be supporting them where we can.

356

:

Yeah.

357

:

Right.

358

:

So Andrew, I think those are all the key

questions that we had regarding the event.

359

:

We definitely want to thank you again for

bringing it to Lehigh Valley and to the

360

:

masses.

361

:

It was an awesome celebration of original,

authentic hip hop between the movie Wild

362

:

Style, having Charlie Ahern there and

Grandmaster Caz and the Cold Crush

363

:

Brothers and Grand Mixer DXT.

364

:

We are eternally grateful for this

opportunity.

365

:

So thank you so much.

366

:

Well, word up, thank you for saying so.

367

:

And, you know, I feel like it's, I mean

this when I say being introduced to you

368

:

all as the Hip Hop Movie Club and watching

your passion and energy, the time you're

369

:

putting into hip hop movies, awoken in me

like, yes, like these movies, we need

370

:

that, you know, let's give them the

platform.

371

:

Let's discuss them.

372

:

Let's break it down.

373

:

This is, we need to do this.

374

:

And so, you know, that-

375

:

The work you're doing with the podcast is

a point of reference for me.

376

:

I just keep at it, keep doing it, I'm

loving it.

377

:

Yeah, I might just watch Just Wright.

378

:

Maybe, maybe.

379

:

When you told me the basketball scenes

aren't like, they're mid, I don't know,

380

:

I'm like.

381

:

Ha ha

382

:

We give you the five takeaways, that's a

new thing.

383

:

We give you the five takeaways, and but

hey-

384

:

a, that's a, that's a, that's, that's

helpful to us, for us.

385

:

Yeah.

386

:

If you like rom-coms and you don't mind

predictability, like we said, go for it.

387

:

You don't expect an Oscar award

performance, but you will see legends.

388

:

You'll see Queen Latifah, you'll see

Common, and if you're a NBA fan, you'll

389

:

see some cameos from some folks that were

pretty big time as well, like Dwayne Wade

390

:

and Dwight Howard, et cetera.

391

:

So yeah, if you want to do some

stargazing.

392

:

your next event coming up.

393

:

Oh, we're, well, we, you know, which one,

which one DynoWright?

394

:

Cause we're working on something and I

know you guys will be talking about it,

395

:

but I'm looking forward to working with

you, you all to present Juice and Krush

396

:

Groove at SteelStacks in Bethlehem, PA.

397

:

In continuation of our celebration of 50

years of hip hop history and culture,

398

:

Northampton Community College is putting

on an event in South Bethlehem.

399

:

with taste smokers, which you guys are

pretty familiar with now, right?

400

:

Where there are two fashion designers in

the Lehigh Valley who will be showcasing

401

:

two Black American fashion designers

showcasing their materials.

402

:

In February, in March, I'll be connecting

with the author, Shanita Hubbard, and

403

:

talking about Black feminism within hip

hop culture and how to be a Black feminist

404

:

and love hip hop at the same time.

405

:

Is that possible?

406

:

Yes.

407

:

that conversation in downtown Bethlehem.

408

:

And then our other signature event is our

keynote speaker, Chuck D of Public Enemy.

409

:

On Tuesday, April 16th, we'll be coming to

Northampton Community College's Bethlehem

410

:

campus for a chat like we're having right

now about the history of hip hop and the

411

:

history of Public Enemy.

412

:

And it should be good.

413

:

All these events are free.

414

:

You can get your tickets, check out the

website.

415

:

50yearsdowntheline.com.

416

:

You'll find links to reserve your tickets

there.

417

:

So by all means, come through.

418

:

We will put these links out on our

platforms for everyone to know about.

419

:

So thank you for that.

420

:

Yeah, word up.

421

:

Thank you guys.

422

:

I appreciate the opportunity to connect

with you.

423

:

I love these conversations.

424

:

It was a pleasure.

425

:

Yep, as do we.

426

:

Alright.

427

:

Hip-Hop Movie Club is produced by your

HHMC's JB, BooGie, and DynoWright.

428

:

Theme music by BooGie.

429

:

In addition to all that, we've got a bunch

e events in the first half of:

430

:

coming up.

431

:

You can learn more at our website,

hiphopmovieclub.com.

432

:

Come hang with us, especially at those

events in Bethlehem.

433

:

Thanks, Andrew.

434

:

All right, I'll check you guys out later.

435

:

Talk to you soon, peace.

436

:

you.

Links