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Jason Brady: A Data Driven Approach to Business Growth
Episode 3214th June 2022 • Beyond The Tools • Reflective Marketing
00:00:00 00:41:37

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Jason Brady shows us the importance of being numbers-driven in business, how to keep employees happy, and fighting labor shortages in the trades industry.

For the full show notes, head on over to:


https://reflectivemarketing.com/podcast/Jason-Brady-A-Data-Driven-Approach-to-Business-Growth

Transcripts

Krystal Hobbs 0:04

Welcome to Beyond the Tools, the podcast that helps contractors attract more leads, grow their business, and finally get off the tools. In each episode, you'll discover marketing tactics that work. You'll get actionable insights from other successful contractors, and connect with experts to help you grow. I'm your host, Krystal Hobbs, owner of a social media agency that helps contractors attract and convert more leads. Get ready to take your business to the next level so you can finally enjoy the fruits of your hard labor. Ready, let's go!

Krystal Hobbs 0:46

Hey, contractors, welcome back to Beyond The Tools. I'm your host, Krystal Hobbs. And let me tell you, today's interview is going to change the way that you run your business for the better. I can almost guarantee that if you listen to this interview in its entirety, and you implement some of the things that our guest goes through today, you are going to have a much more profitable business with much happier people. And let me tell you why. Today's guest is Jason Brady. He's the founder of Above and Beyond Service Company based in Oklahoma. And if there's one thing I know about Jason, he has a tight handle on all of his numbers. And he credits that to his success and his tremendous growth over the last number of years at Above and Beyond. In this interview, Jason shares with us why he started tracking his numbers, the specific metrics that he's keeping an eye on, and how that has led to some pretty incredible strategic decisions that not only allow him to run a more profitable business but allow him to retain his employees because they are happier and get this, his techs don't work in the evenings. That is just one small but very important decision that came from Jason knowing his numbers. We're gonna dig into all of that. Let's get right to it and head on over to Jason.

Krystal Hobbs 2:28

I'm thrilled to introduce today's guest Jason Brady of the Above and Beyond Service Company. Jason, welcome to the show.

Jason Brady 2:36

Thank you so much for having me.

Krystal Hobbs 2:37

Awesome. So Jason, why don't you tell us a little bit about Above and Beyond and where you guys are at today, just so our listeners have a bit of context as we go into this.

Jason Brady 2:49

e have been in business since:

Krystal Hobbs 3:28

Amazing. Well, congratulations on all your growth to date. That's incredible to hear where you guys are at. So I know Jason for you we've had some conversations about numbers and why it's so important to know your numbers. Why do you think numbers are so crucial as a business owner but especially in the home service industry?

Jason Brady 3:53

So I think a lot of times (and I can only speak for people I've talked with and myself, things I've done) a lot of times people operate off feeling in this business. I think Jimmy's my best tech. I think Jimmy is doing the best job for me. You can think a lot of things but you're not really doing the right thing. And for me, I thought man this guy's killing it. Then, as we became more data-driven, the man's sets deteriorated. His average tickets are low, which is kind of funny because since we started tracking guys who we didn't think were the best and spent a lot of time on calls, they actually have the highest sales percentage, have the highest average ticket, have the highest tech generate leads, have the highest conversions, and knowing your numbers is like driving your car down the road. If you tape your gas gauge, you can stop every now and then to get gas, but what if you forget and run out? And I believe that if you want to stay in business and really grow, and you want to be one of these guys who have a $5 million company, a $20 million company, or a $100 million company, you have to know your numbers and know all of them. One of our mentors tells us, what gets measured gets improved. And there's just a lot of truth to that, because the men we know who need help with numbers, we do ride-along, extra coaching with them, we do everything we can to help them boost their numbers.

Krystal Hobbs 5:38

Right. And in your business, I guess, were you always numbers-driven? What was the catalyst that made you realize that you've really got to get a handle on this?

Jason Brady 5:51

So we were motivated by our feelings? We believe this is positive and that we are doing well here. So I boarded a plane bound for Houston, Texas. In essence, one of our distributors owns a jet. So I boarded a flight with Chris Hunter, a former owner of several super jets. And I got to talk to Chris on the way there and back, as well as at this conference that we attended, and he just gave me some really wonderful free advice. And, we kind of spoke about numbers and just some stuff, and I was like, this guy's got these three separate places, and he has all these super techs running around. And, to be honest, it all started there. That's when I realized, this is like a deal. And so, it was a gradual process, since I didn't have all of the numbers that we have now. But, we started with, "All right, let's pursue this. And let's go with that.” That's where it all began, after all. The most important thing that has to happen based on the data we discovered, and this is the most important thing, is that your jobs be differentiated. So, for example, if you're attempting to measure the average ticket for an HVAC service tech, if you include maintenance tickets with a service ticket, you'll never obtain a genuine average ticket or a true opportunity job average because those are two different professions. And I believe that laying a solid foundation is the first step in this process.

Krystal Hobbs 7:37

So once you started really focusing on the numbers and profitability of what you were doing, what kind of impact did that make for your company?

Jason Brady 7:48

So last year, we did 5 million, we had a 24.3% EBITDA number. So basically, we kept a million bucks of that 5 million we did. The difference that made is we have all brand new vans. I think our oldest van right now is 14 with over 200,000 miles on it. There's nothing wrong with it. Everything else is new or we've purchased in the last couple of years.

Krystal Hobbs 8:14

Amazing. Well, congratulations again. And I'd love to dig into that. So, if our listeners are hearing you and saying, ”What I am really feelings-based on my business,” what are some of the things that they should start to look at?

Jason Brady 8:32

So, first and foremost, I believe you must have your jobs, and your job type correctly set up, whether it's HVAC, plumbing, electrical, or whatever it is. So, for HVAC service, we have several services, such as maintenance, which is separate from installation, which is different from sales. So, we have four services, zero to five, five, six to twelve, and then twelve plus, and that's the same for every service. And so we differentiated so we can see, where are the majority of our calls? So, where are we attempting to go with our calls? Where are our leads? What is our average ticket on the lower end? What's our typical ticket from six to twelve? Which of the 12 pluses? What is our typical ticket price? How many of those were tech leads that were passed on to, say, a comfort advisor? And basically, that's how we did it with electrical, with plumbing, everything's pretty much the same way. It's different for water heaters and things like that. But the premise is the same. And I believe that's where we started dividing those positions for ourselves. And then you can start tracking things like, okay, this individual ran 8 maintenance calls, here's what it is. And I believe that once you have that foundation, you can start finding out where you are and what you need to do to better.

Krystal Hobbs 9:58

That makes perfect sense. So, actually breaking down on average tickets and examining each line of the business. And, as you indicated previously, many of our listeners work in heating and cooling. So, precisely, what is the relationship between a repair call and an installation or replacement based on the figures you're seeing now?

Jason Brady:

So here's how we see it: 30% of our calls to our office should be replacement opportunities. That is our internal code. Some people are 20 percent, and some people are more than that. And for us, our office should be able to replace 30% of what comes in. If we have a 12-plus opportunity. This is the moment for the technician to identify any problems with the system and make the case for replacement. I mean, are the fan motors pulling objects, or is it the capacitor? The contactors are burned out, the charges are low, and there is rust all over the coil. And here's the perfect basis, to me, for constructing a scenario where the property owner. Two separate techs went up to this property on the guy on both properties. So, A, the tech, walks up to the property, where the indoor units are roughly 15 years old and the outside units are 25 years old. Tech B travels to a house, which is 12 years old all around. It's the heating season now. Check that he had only talked about what was wrong with the furnace and why the guy should replace the coil because of the rust and that he had not done anything further. Checked in at the other house and discussed everything wrong with the furnace. He discovered the leak, discussed everything on the wrong side, and mentioned the hail damage to the condenser outdoors. The same guy was interacting with both of them over the phone and via email, and the tech was sold a full system on a 12-year-old tech with the only difference being a sold difference. Check to see if he had a better opportunity. However, by making the case, we are assuming that. So it was a learning experience. Of course, for the other technician, it was an opportunity to revisit some things that we had learned by tracking our data and seeing in column TGL tech-generated leads. So, by evaluating our TGL and recognizing, “Okay, his TGL is a little lower.” Why is it less? That helped us figure out what was going on.

Krystal Hobbs:

That's a fantastic story. And, I mean, it really demonstrates how engaging deeper with a client can make a difference in both the customer's experience and the money gained from that particular task. I know that when it comes to team development and motivation, we hear a lot about the very real labor scarcity in the trades. How are you coping with that? Is that anything that has proven to be a significant challenge for you?

Jason Brady:

It is, however, to be honest, we've discovered that we've begun to grow our own techs inside. So we were on a route where we simply made up our own text. We have two oilfield workers. We had a guy come in with a criminal justice degree. Now comes the workforce. He was in charge of probation and parole. We've recently started training ourselves with a diverse group of guys. We've sent some people to classes, we've done some in-house training, and we've done some in-house sales training. To be honest, by expanding our guys on the inside, they reach out to their buddies. And a fantastic example is a man from the oilfield who brought a buddy of his over, who brought a cousin over. He brings these folks over. And they enjoy life here. They're all pumped to be here, because of the labor scarcity. But I also believe it is how you handle our guys; if we don't make our get, if we don't have our guys, we'll contact you at 12 a.m. or 10 p.m. So, going back to the figures, we discovered that our average ticket on the day, or during working hours, is always 350 or more, which occasionally gets you, but we're always at a minimum of 350 since we average everything out. Or after one of our service calls, I believe our average is $153.

Krystal Hobbs:

Big difference.

Jason Brady:

So we're running these calls and the men don't care; they just want to go home and not be out. So we've made it a rule that our guys finish at six o'clock. And we have a regular shift during the summer. Then there's a guy who works like. And he works until eight o'clock, at which point he's done. But he doesn't approach him. So, having two distinct shifts helps him to get some of those later calls. But he's not exhausted. Then there's the rotation, where every five weeks they receive a three-day weekend. And so it has simply allowed them to be a little bit more flexible and free. No, I'm going to be home for supper or close to it, I'll be able to go to my kids' game, and I'm not going to be out till, say, 11 p.m. I mean, if we lose any business, it's probably because the data don't reflect that we were effective and it was worth our time.

Krystal Hobbs:

It sounds so simple. But it's also so revolutionary I think for the industry to think that you would say, “I know we're not going to work past six or 8 pm.”

Jason Brady:

It's scary, I assure you; I didn't do it and think, wow, this is a fantastic idea. In truth, not only is it not the most difficult, but it has allowed us to make our guys happier. And our clients are happier since they are having a better experience. And for us, it's all about the old adage, "slow and steady wins the race." That's something we've heard a million times in our lives. So for us, it's not a matter of well, let's get through a service call; our average maintenance call lasts two hours. So, if we have a membership or a customer that isn't a tuner tonight, our usual maintenance call to complete a tune-up is two hours. That's how thorough they inspect everything; our service calls last approximately two hours, and as a result, we have higher average tickets; for example, I have a tech in service right now, and the average ticket is about, what it was as of this morning, 11170 bucks. And it's the extras he's added, like surge protection and blower cleanings, that have to add capacity to maintenance or a service call. It's those extra things and people. We used to think a lot of times, we can't go out there, we don't have the time to go out there. And so the numbers show, so our revenue goal for this month for service was 40,428. Our revenue actual is 32,279.

right now for installation is:

Krystal Hobbs:

And that really ties into your brand as well.

Jason Brady:

The trouble is, we don't always get it right. But if we don't get it right the first time, we go back and even give a level above to ensure that it was a mistake and we messed up. But you should know that we'll make things right. And we had a lady who literally torched us on social media after a tech washed the condenser halfway the other day. And I called her and talked to her because she really had some other problems, and we talked to her and went through it and fixed her problems. And now she's said that these are the best guys ever, go off on the wrong foot but man they do live up to the name just like a static. And so we got off on the wrong foot but we did the right thing. We also now have a brand ambassador. We had a man walk through the ceiling. Anyone who has worked as an HVAC and has done HVAC work so many steps via ceiling works on your team. These people were really concerned because we have a painter that does sheetrock as well as all levels and personnel. He physically went in, fixed everything, and painted their kitchen, living room, and entry halls, all of which were connected and were painted every minute. And they were astounded that he had gone to such lengths as we had told them. This is what we require of you. They live in a gated neighborhood that is smaller and older. They sent us $200,000 in compensation for replacement chances that we completed. Amazingly, it only cost us $1500 to complete all of that. It is all about the numbers, but it is also about doing what you say and admitting your mistakes.

Krystal Hobbs:

I love that. That's incredible. So Jason, go back to motivating your team. So obviously it sounds like taking care of your guys and considering their lives beyond work is a big part of that. But how else do you keep your team engaged and take care of them?

Jason Brady:

We do different things. Monday, we're all going to talk golf, we do parties where we take the team, we usually do one in June, we'll take the entire team to like a restaurant and their spouses. Last June, we rented out a big patio place down in Oklahoma City. So we try to do things like that for the females, and I believe this is where we as owners and managers fall short. We are concerned about our employees' productivity, what we forget about are the wives, girlfriends, and fiances. So every quarter, our office staff, although all of the office personnel is ladies, gets together, and they get all of the wives, girlfriends, and everything else. It makes no difference where the tech installer warehouse is located. If you work here, your spouse will be asked, and they will all go out to get their nails done. Get them and we'll pay for brunch, wine, whatever it is, they pick something and then go. And what happens is that when that guy says, hey, I want to quit, the spouse says, “No, those are my buddies. We are not quitting; we just do not do that. We're not going to do that.” And that's what we do with a lot of those is we do things to help build the culture and help make sure the family is on board. And when we have a Christmas party, every year without fail, I talked about how, without the sacrifice of the women at home, and unfortunately, at this point, we don't have any female techs, I would love to have some, there are only two of us guys in the office, everybody else is a woman, which I love, it's a great balance and they really keep us in line, but we talked about how their sacrifice and allowing them to occasionally work late and do those things are what makes us successful.

Krystal Hobbs:

I love that. That's brilliant and wonderful.

Jason Brady:

We're in a unique challenge with labor, with people's lives, we're in a unique spot. And if our only goal is to make as much money as we're going to make and we're not worried about taking care of our team and taking care of teams and families, you're going to always have a labor shortage problem. I mean, we've hired two people this week. I've got another one coming in this morning that wants a job that past the first interview that's coming from the second we're going to offer her job. If the first interview is indicative of what's going to happen. The second interview will give her an offer letter writing. And it's one of those things where it's a huge deal for us.

Krystal Hobbs:

Amazing. And Jason, you strike me as a very empathetic and forward-thinking leader, which I love. How would you say your mindset has evolved over the course of running your business?

Jason Brady:

So I grew up and my dad was real. Think of the best way to say my dad was real and the other bosses I had were like, this is what we need to do and this is what we're going to do, and my gosh, you're gonna do this and just real rigid and I was that way for a long time. Today, I am not that one. Today, I'm more about okay, what do we need to do? How do we need what do we need to do take care of the things that we need to do to, make people have a better experience. I mean, honestly, it's a lot about that. Today, it's a lot about just being software general or, the days of being the dictator or GM. If people have an idea in our company, I want to hear if people have an issue, I want, if people have a problem, I want to know. And sometimes that problem is me. And I've had to hear some tough criticism that I did not want to hear it was uncomfortable, and it's uncomfortable. “You're hanging on, you're being a jerk, and you're being unrealistic. Or you're being emotional.” And as business owners, I'm pretty sure that most of us business owners are a D personality if you took the DiSC profile, and you think about it, you'd be that high D. And I think they say it stands for Director, it's really dictator is what it is. I think that we're all that way.

And I think to be better, if you want to keep employees and you want to grow a successful company, it has to be more about what we're going to do and influence. And, it has to be more about just taking care of your people and being softer, gentler, kinder understanding. And by doing that, I figured out that this guy really has a problem here. So I need to help this guy, I need to go to a rival, I need to go. He needs more training on this. And honestly, from doing that, it's helped us figure out like, who we need to help and who we need to do stuff for. And it's made the team happier, it's made the team better, we're not calling, hey, what's going on? Why are you still my job? You've been there an hour and a half, now, like, I was a wet lift early the other day, and I was actually grocery shopping. And the office called when people from the offices were like, Hey, can you check on this guy? He's been there an hour, and there's nothing in the Invoice Summary. And I was like, Sure. And so I call and he was going what's up? Man, the mothership called and said, I need to check on what's going on something goes wrong, need some help? Anything happening? Now that I haven't put it in, here's what's happening. I'm getting ready to do that right now. This is what's going on. I've been talking to the customer. Literally had it under control. But just shifting that focus, and approaching in a different way dealt with our team and helped our team be more comfortable with what was going on.

Krystal Hobbs:

Amazing. I love that. And I mean, you're not calling in an accusatory and like putting your employee on the defense more so checking in, which is totally cool.

Jason Brady:

I'll be even when I'm not in the office, pretty much all the time now. Yesterday, I went out and helped a little bit in the field, we had a guy that was going to a wedding. It's kind of weird to have a wedding on the day that they did, but whatever. But he was going to the wedding. And so I literally went out and helped in the field. And they were like, wow, and just, I had a junior Tech with me, and we were just running around looking for problems. And it's how we look at this. And this I didn't think of that and I think I'm getting more into doing ride-along half days with people. And it's really helped. Because, as owners, we have a whole bunch of knowledge. And so while my primary job is looking at numbers and seeing where we're at, and what's our average ticket, and where are all these other numbers at? Well, that's part of my job. The other part of my job was also training. The other part of my job was also team building. The other part of my job is also helping them have a good, building their self-confidence makes sense.

Krystal Hobbs:

I should have asked this earlier, but how many employees do you have right now?

Jason Brady:

It's 39 people here between salespeople, office, field staff, and warehouse.

Krystal Hobbs:

Fantastic, and I guess it makes a big difference that, they can work with you personally at times, too, and I'm sure that's good for morale and stuff as

Jason Brady:

It is. And, I'll tell you, so we're gonna go back to the numbers. We did 5 million last year, we ended up with numbers. We ended, we had 22 people that worked at it finally. And I went and visited this company, I've got a friend, it's got a company and when he visited them, it was his company's $22 million company. And I thought, “Man, you have a lot of people and I literally got to sit with I mean, he and I literally sat and talked and went over numbers for almost two days. Just whatever numbers and planning and why he does certain things. And I was like, “Man, your overheads heavy” and he's trying his five-year goal. So when he got the company, he and he and his two other partners, when they purchased the company, they were doing 14 million. He purchased it two years ago, his goal was 25 million. And in 18 months, when I was out there, they were 22. So they're gonna have to revise that goal. And I was like, wow, he's like, he was mad, he was, you can't grow. You said we can't get we can't be a $25 million company with a $15 million staff. And I was like, wait a minute, what? It really likes, I don't want to say hurt me, but it really likes cut me deep. And I was like, Okay, so let me think about this. And so at that point, then what I started doing was really looking at numbers and what we need to do, where are we at, and what's going on. And honestly, then at that point, we started working on hiring folks and really segregating roles. And we have a dispatcher that all she does is dispatch and our CSRs just see us and do CSR roles. And we really started splitting up all of our roles. And this is the only thing to do, follow up coordinator, this is your job. And honestly, our business started running a lot more fluidly. People weren't as worked, people walk a lot more, they're less stressed, it's really helped us a lot.

Krystal Hobbs:

Amazing. And, Jason, I know, we covered a lot here today, and you've had so many incredible insights, especially about being more numbers-driven, taking care of your team and the business mindset, and what it looks like to grow a company. With all that in mind, any last words of wisdom for any of our listeners who are looking to get to that next level of growth in their company?

Jason Brady:

First off, I think it goes back to I think that you have to whatever CRM you're using, it needs to be set up. Whatever CRM you're using has to be set up correctly, your numbers have to be set up correctly, and the data you get out of it has to be set up correctly. And so I think that's number one, and whether it's you can do it, we have a point person in the office that her whole job is to optimize ServiceTitan and make sure we're using as many features as we can make sure the data going in and going out is right. That's our whole job. There are people who would think, you're just throwing away whatever. For us, that person was 52,000. That's her job. That's what her salary is. Somebody thinks, man, you're just throwing that away. The numbers though, if you think about it, and why it's so important for us is, and I'm gonna do some quick math for you. So if we just have five, five guys running once, we have five guys by service guys, that run four calls a day, right? So that's 20 calls a day, if she improves my average ticket, by 50 bucks by me having the right numbers, that's $1,000 a day. So if we only run, so let's just say let's take that times a week. So that's five weeks. And let's say that we only do that for 30 weeks out of consistent. So $150,000. She just helped me make another 148,000 in revenue. If that numbers 100, I'm almost making 300,000. And that's why the numbers are so important. Knowing your average ticket, your opportunity job average, what's my membership conversion rate? Are my tech-generated leads? What's my cancel rate? What's my call count? I mean, like, I can tell you right now for today's probably actually going to be we should have done it first of the month. So our call count for the month for HVAC service is 116. We actually are at 114. We were we're right at our number, we're well over our number. But let's take that and let's just say that our call cap is 116. And today, we were at 53. And so let's let me try this different. Let me try this different way. So we know our call count. If we knew today we needed five calls to hit our call count for the day and we only had four we could only manufacture four and then if tomorrow we need five we actually need six because we missed one. So we can back into that number and know what's our call count. There's a bunch of information out there. ServiceTitan has the contractor playbook, which has a bunch of those numbers that anybody can get, there's a bunch of numbers that matter.

I think the most important thing is to start with some numbers and figure out where are you on your average ticket? Where are you out under turnovers, and then start figuring out, okay, if today I'm at 283, I need to I want to be at the end of this month 300? In the next month, I want to be at 350. And we do things to help guys, we have contests for the highest average ticket we have, and we have a review contest for right now. So the person with the most reviews in 90 days gets $1,000 cash. There's a minimum number to say, the next person gets 500 the person after that 250. I mean, you don't think guys gonna want reviews, you don't think they're not talking? I mean, that's a huge thing. And so a lot of it is ways to motivate your team, while also measuring your numbers and increasing performance. It can't all be about, you got to do this like and make money. It has to be about, here's a goal, here's what the industry standard is, and here's where we're at, I want to increase it by this much this month. And for us, it's been by slowing down. Honestly, for us, it's been by slowing it down. It's not selling people stuff they don't need, it's not selling people, systems before they need it. It's about what's actually going on here, what's going to cause problems, what are issues that are going to increase or decrease the comfort in the home, and then presenting those options to customers and letting them choose when customers shop on Amazon. Nobody that I know ever goes on Amazon to buy one thing and that's one thing that Amazon is great about giving you 17 other options that other people like you have bought that you'd like.

Jason Brady:

And so when the guys get away from shopping with their pocketbook and letting the customers choose, and given all those different options, customers like “Let's do this and this and this.” Surge protection is an easy one. I noticed that you don't have surge protection on your units outside. I'm not worried about it. Do you have one on your TV? Well, of course, how much is your TV? Oh, where I got that best buy for $2,500. So your $10,000 HVAC system is less important than your TV? What do you mean? And the dialogue goes from there and then before you know it, you just sold surge protection for the inside outdoor unit. And so the techs made money, the companies made money, and the customer has more protection because those surge devices come with warranty stuff with them. Everybody wins in that situation. Does everybody take advantage of it? No. But if every tech sells one today, I think ours is 259 is what the surge protection is, so if you do one of those buyers, your techs every day, I mean, knowing your numbers and haven't been able to add those little things that are would increase your bottom line, what is going to get you more profitability, more revenue, the ability to buy new vans, the ability to pay cash for new vans, which is a huge thing. So when you want to slow much, you're not trying to figure out how to make money, how to manufacture money, the ability to go and slow months, and keep your team by having training in your lab. I mean, that's what all that extra money does that extra money doesn't know to buy boats and houses and jets that extra money goes to improve operations, and keep your people employed throughout the year. That's what that money goes.

Krystal Hobbs:

Absolutely.

Jason Brady:

That's what it does.

Krystal Hobbs:

I can't stop smiling because I think everything you've provided here is so valuable. I cannot wait till this episode goes live, so I can send it to all of our clients. So thank you so much for this. I know our listeners are gonna want to learn more about you. So what's the best way for them to learn more.

Jason Brady:

So if they want to learn more, they got questions, whatever, we obviously help. It's way easier to help in the winter, spring, and fall than it is in the summer but they can reach out to us. They can actually reach out to me personally at jason@pinkvantechs.com, is an easy one to remember. And so they can reach out there. If they want to know more about getting on ServiceTitan, we'd be happy to help. People that we help get on ServiceTitan, we also help onboard. We had a company from Florida actually Jenergy that you held, you did a podcast with. Jen came up here and we literally sat with her for two days, her and one of her people and literally helped get them completely set up on ServiceTitan. When they left they were ready to book calls or jobs were right so we do that for the folks that we like to help get hooked up with ServiceTitan that we refer on board, just because we can be more involved in the process. And we can help make sure that they start correctly because the people who write about ServiceTitan are the ones that normally don't have somebody in the office that set it up right. And they're not going to spend the time to set it up right, and those are normal and that's the hardest part. Setting it up is the hardest part. But because we have everything we can just literally put it on thumb drives transfer, make sure it's important, right? Make sure they know how to use it and then off. During those two days, they like sat with, actually, they were here for three. They sat with our customers, our CSRs’ follow-up coordinators, techs, all that and just kind of saw the whole operation.

Krystal Hobbs:

Wow. That sounds like an incredible opportunity.

Jason Brady:

Well, it's good for us because we’ve been given so much in the industry whether it's Chris Hogan or Tom Howard, Ben Robles in Nebraska, John Henry, Trey McWilliams in McWilliams and Sons, Crystal from Lemon Seed, we've been given so much by so many people. It's really our duty and obligation to help give other people some of what we've been doing.

Krystal Hobbs:

Absolutely. Well, I think that's a beautiful place to end. Thank you so much, Jason, for being on the show.

Jason Brady:

My pleasure. Have a good one.

Krystal Hobbs:

Thank you so much for listening to this episode of Beyond the Tools. If you liked what you heard, please subscribe, rate, and review wherever you get your podcast. I'd love it if you could also share this episode with a fellow contractor who is ready to get off the tools and grow their business. And if you want more leads, sign up for our email list at [reflectivemarketing.com](http://reflectivemarketing.com/) where we share weekly marketing insights that you can't get anywhere else. I'm Krystal Hobbs and I hope you'll join me on the next episode of Beyond the Tools. See you next time!