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Win Some, Learn Some, Never Lose, with Joel Green (Sports, Basketball, Improvement, Success)
Episode 40415th November 2022 • The Action Catalyst • Southwestern Family of Companies
00:00:00 00:25:22

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Joel Green, CEO of Pro Level Training, National Director of Nike Sports Camps, and a former professional basketball player, talks about growing up in an abandoned home, explains the concepts of “filtering” and “camouflage opportunities”, striking deep and striking gold, why fun doesn’t come first and insecurity is the ground for improvement, recounts playing professional basketball in Europe, how to respond instead of react, and not being put here FOR ourselves, but to BE ourselves.

Transcripts

Intro:

Today's guest is Joel Green, chief Executive Officer of Pro-Level Training, the National Director of Nike Sports Camps, a former professional basketball player and a renowned motivational speaker, a thought leader in the motivational category.

Intro:

Joel has a BA in psychology from Ryder University and brings his wisdom to business owners, entrepreneurs, and young.

Intro:

A.

Intro:

Joel's book Filtering the Way to Extract Strength from the Struggle is out now.

Intro:

We hope you enjoy.

Dan Moore:

Joel Green, welcome to the Action Catalyst.

Dan Moore:

Uh, thank

Joel Green:

for having you.

Joel Green:

I appreciate it.

Joel Green:

It's

Dan Moore:

gonna be a lot of fun to learn more about your new book that's out now called Filtering.

Dan Moore:

I really curious about that concept, but I wonder if you could take us back in a little bit of a mini biography of your life and, and share some of those major pivot points where things were going in a certain direction and some that happened to make you move in a different direct.

Dan Moore:

And over time it culminated in the position of influence that you're in today.

Joel Green:

I mean, I've had quite a few of those, you know, so many pivotal moments, moments to where I detect to suddenly shift unexpectedly, you know, shift as towards my mindset, not just a physical shift.

Joel Green:

Emotionally.

Joel Green:

Um, you know, growing up I went through a number of things early on that helped me develop, I dare say, a callus to different hardships, a callus to different difficulties in life.

Joel Green:

And many of those difficulties has helped me comparatively.

Joel Green:

Today when I'm going through a difficulty, I say, you know what?

Joel Green:

Don't sweat it too much because of what you've gone through even at a young age.

Joel Green:

You know, growing up I grew up in, in Philadelphia, north Philadelphia.

Joel Green:

Uh, I grew up in an abandoned home.

Joel Green:

Sounds pretty crazy, but, you know, we literally had graffiti on our, on some of our walls, holes in the staircase that maybe my siblings used to play games on, like hopscotch, just hop around the hole to say, you don't get stuck.

Joel Green:

Things like that, you know, it sound like it was fun and games, but in hindsight, as I began to get older, I'm like, That was a difficult time, you know, to not have hot water sometimes, and my older siblings had to go next door with pots and pans from our parents to get hot water and we have to come back and sit 'em on top of the heater.

Joel Green:

So we had hot water, you know, different things like that helped me to really grow up and say, you know what?

Joel Green:

I know where I came from.

Joel Green:

I know what tough feels.

Joel Green:

I, I witnessed violence early on, being close to a shooting when I was six years old, things like that.

Joel Green:

I don't sweat too much nowadays, and people will see me in a positive light.

Joel Green:

Call me an optimist.

Joel Green:

I'm just really grateful.

Joel Green:

It's not being optimistic.

Joel Green:

I'm just grateful to be here and I'm grateful to have opportunity to succeed at

Dan Moore:

something.

Dan Moore:

I think that's an incredible story because not everybody chooses to respond in the way you did.

Dan Moore:

Can you share maybe why you feel like you had that inner ability to, to respond to this in a grateful way?

Dan Moore:

Not a harsh way.

Dan Moore:

Not in a giving up way.

Joel Green:

You know what?

Joel Green:

In my household, my parents literally, Told us we're not allowed to say cat.

Joel Green:

And it may sound cliche, it may sound a little corny, but we, we got in trouble.

Joel Green:

I, I got in trouble.

Joel Green:

I remember when I was eight years old for saying, cat and I didn't eat that night.

Joel Green:

I'll, I'll put it that way.

Joel Green:

That type of belief system helped develop that I can attitude to where despite what was going on in life, no matter what was going on internally or externally, I could still do something.

Joel Green:

Beyond what occurred.

Joel Green:

You know, what I began writing about and what I began speaking on to different audiences over the years was this, this method of filtering that I came up with just to distract myself, to be honest, difficult things would be going on, and I would distract myself by setting a goal to not think on the difficulty.

Joel Green:

I just began extracting some good stuff from the bad stuff, and they became my driving.

Dan Moore:

Hmm.

Dan Moore:

Well, let's, let's dig into that.

Dan Moore:

Your book is called Filtering the Way It Extracts Strength From the Struggle.

Dan Moore:

Can you expand on some of those principles of filtering and first, how you used it and then how everybody can use it?

Joel Green:

Well, absolutely.

Joel Green:

So filtering it itself, it is a method that I, I've used just to, like I said, to really, you know, break my situations down so that I'm not overwhelmed by it.

Joel Green:

You know, so much of what we go through shuts us down and stops us and make us quit at different things, merge ventures and goals, cuz we're overwhelmed.

Joel Green:

It's too big of a.

Joel Green:

By filtering the experience, whatever the circumstance is, you know, you're able to break things down.

Joel Green:

You lean into it as opposed to try to ignore it and run from it, and you, you literally will say, okay, what can I take from this situation to actually propel me further as opposed to just living on the surface of our situations?

Joel Green:

The surface generally is always as.

Joel Green:

But when you dig into it and you lean into it a little bit more, you find that seed of positivity within it, some type of driving force.

Joel Green:

And that comes by way of filtering and just breaking down the situations and learning how to properly make adjustments.

Joel Green:

And as we do these, these things, We'll start to see so many opportunities that exist within things that seems non opportunistic.

Joel Green:

I'll, I'll put it that way, camouflage opportunities.

Joel Green:

That's something that I'm big on.

Joel Green:

There's so much in front of our eyes that we don't even see and if, if we dare to lean into them by way of filtering.

Joel Green:

What we have going on, we'll actually gain foresight into what's taking place as opposed to going through something and having to wait on hindsight to reveal the answer to us.

Dan Moore:

Man, I love that approach.

Joel Green:

Honestly, it's a game for me now, and that's one thing I've been telling people.

Joel Green:

I said, life will become fun.

Joel Green:

With the difficult isn't even a difficult thing for you anymore because now you even take those things on as a challenge to improve you.

Joel Green:

You always see an opportunity to improve.

Joel Green:

I tell people now I'm undefeated.

Joel Green:

I wing some and I learn some.

Joel Green:

I don't lose.

Joel Green:

I'm undefeated

Joel Green:

, Dan Moore: I win some and I learn.

Joel Green:

So , that's a great way to put it.

Joel Green:

Now, no.

Joel Green:

Along the way you've hit numerous brick walls.

Joel Green:

What can you share with us on some ways to figure out what to do when our progress is completely stopped?

Joel Green:

Well, number one, be trans.

Joel Green:

Be transparent with yourself to begin with, not just with other people.

Joel Green:

You know, we always talk about transparency with, you know, with other people, and being open and honest.

Joel Green:

You have to do that with yourself first.

Joel Green:

And if you don't start there, even once you talk to someone else, it won't fully come out.

Joel Green:

So when we hit a brick wall, realize, okay, something got me, I, I'm stuck and I understand that.

Joel Green:

I notice it now.

Joel Green:

It's the proper, the perfect time to try and make an adjustment and, and not allow for.

Joel Green:

That difficulty, that out school, that failure to to be an end point, it has to be a midpoint, and realizing that you're just literally in a process right now.

Joel Green:

That's how I look at every failure.

Joel Green:

I, I literally see it as a, as a midpoint from you.

Joel Green:

It's never an end point.

Dan Moore:

That is so great because that forces you to realize there's gonna be a sun coming up tomorrow.

Dan Moore:

There is something after this thing.

Dan Moore:

It's not an hand, it's a midpoint.

Dan Moore:

That's a great mindset to take to it.

Dan Moore:

I

Joel Green:

try to remind myself as fast as I possibly can.

Joel Green:

That's the thing too, and I speak on that often.

Joel Green:

We have to remind ourselves as quick as we possibly can.

Joel Green:

It is a process.

Joel Green:

It's a process.

Joel Green:

It's a process.

Joel Green:

As opposed to this was it.

Joel Green:

As soon as I'm able to remind myself of that, I take one more step forward and that's all I need half

Dan Moore:

the time.

Dan Moore:

Well, that's true.

Dan Moore:

That one more step can often be the difference.

Dan Moore:

Joel, how do, how do you keep growing personally?

Dan Moore:

I mean, you've had career as a professional basketball player.

Dan Moore:

You're highly successful entrepreneur with, uh, pro-level training, expanding into many different states, all parts of the world.

Dan Moore:

Eventually, you're very recognizable as a product spokesperson and model.

Dan Moore:

You're a speaker.

Dan Moore:

What do you do to, to avoid that sense of getting complacent and just kind of on the coast a bit?

Joel Green:

I don't know how this really sounds, but I celebrate less, right?

Joel Green:

I enjoy my moments, believe me, so I internally I celebrate.

Joel Green:

But externally, I don't allow for the celebration to make me stagnant.

Joel Green:

I enjoy all that I do.

Joel Green:

I'm grateful for all that I'm able to achieve.

Joel Green:

I thank God for it and that I keep moving forward.

Joel Green:

I know what it feels like to become complacent.

Joel Green:

I felt that as an athlete before, and I saw the resulting factor was I played a little worse the following season when I became complacent after victory.

Joel Green:

And I said, okay.

Joel Green:

I did great and I celebrated during the off season, and I come back as a lesser athlete the next year.

Joel Green:

I said, okay, I'm not doing this again.

Joel Green:

I'm gonna celebrate for, you know, a day or a moment.

Joel Green:

And I'm gonna move on to the next goal.

Joel Green:

And that's one of the main things for me to where, when I achieve something, you know, I, I, I try my best to achieve, you know, to have a, a, a mindset of humility.

Joel Green:

You know, you've done this great job, don't be high on yourself.

Joel Green:

Another thing that also helps me out is having a heart of expectancy.

Joel Green:

So, I'm big on when I set a goal for myself, I visualized this goal to a t.

Joel Green:

I'm talking about to the, to the points where I feel like as if I already have it before I even scrape the surface of touching it.

Joel Green:

There's an exercise that I do, I take myself through and I feel what I'm about to go after, so that once I'm already pursuing it, I feel like I already have it.

Joel Green:

I expect it to occur.

Joel Green:

So once I finally get it, I'm not celebrating so high as if it was something I've never done before.

Joel Green:

In my mind, in my heart, I've already done it, and so once I get it done, I'm already working on it.

Joel Green:

The next.

Dan Moore:

Can you share a little bit about the role of other people that keep us on

Joel Green:

track?

Joel Green:

Absolutely.

Joel Green:

I mean, there, there's a number of people, my parents to be begin with.

Joel Green:

You know, my parents are amazing.

Joel Green:

They're, you know, two of the most intelligent people I know, you know, I dare say they are the two most intelligent people I know.

Joel Green:

They've taught me so much and still are.

Joel Green:

I reach out to them if I'm going through a difficulty of challenge.

Joel Green:

I figured they have some type.

Joel Green:

They don't have the answer.

Joel Green:

They have something that can lead me to the answer.

Joel Green:

Uh, they're two pastors.

Joel Green:

They're, they're preachers, so you know, they're, they're well read.

Joel Green:

They, they, they know a lot about life.

Joel Green:

They help guide other people.

Joel Green:

Those are two of my guides, and I have some other mentors as well.

Joel Green:

Former coaches.

Joel Green:

One of my high school coaches, he's become like an uncle to me, to where I can reach out to him for anything.

Joel Green:

Uh, just a bit of advice.

Joel Green:

He will be very open and honest with me, and that's exactly what I need.

Joel Green:

And that's why I will hope that when someone's going through something, don't reach out to that yes friend all the time.

Joel Green:

Don't reach out to the Yes mentor all the time.

Joel Green:

Reach out to that person that may strike you deep, you know, with some of their.

Joel Green:

But what you have to realize is a lot of times they'll be striking gold.

Joel Green:

You know, a lot of people aren't willing to strike deep.

Joel Green:

Those aren't the ones you always need to reach out to.

Joel Green:

For me, I reach out to those people like my brothers, my sister, my parents that can literally tell me what it is and what I need to do and not try to butter me up.

Joel Green:

The

Dan Moore:

ones that'll speak truth to you cuz they love you enough to do that.

Joel Green:

Absolutely.

Joel Green:

I mean, that's, that's really what it's all about.

Dan Moore:

Yeah.

Dan Moore:

Now you work some really long days, you, you take a lot of pride in your work ethic.

Dan Moore:

Do you have a, a morning routine that just starts every day in very much similar manner?

Joel Green:

Yeah.

Joel Green:

So, you know, preferably, you know, I wake up at 5:00 AM and I'll, I'll, I'll pray to begin the day for a good 20 minutes or so.

Joel Green:

Pray form of meditation beyond that point by just sitting, still thinking about whatever.

Joel Green:

Comes to mind, to be honest with you, as I prep for my day, I go ahead and I work out, do a physical workout for the day, for about an hour or so.

Joel Green:

Usually wake my son up by the time we work out together, and he prefers to work out in the morning.

Joel Green:

He's nine years old, but he is already, you know, a little version of me.

Joel Green:

So we work out and then I get to work after that point, you know, do business and, uh, start to prep the emails and calls and things that I.

Joel Green:

For me, it is so important to, to maximize for my end, to maximize on the hours of the day.

Joel Green:

Uh, and I realized that the earlier I began, I got it from being an athlete.

Joel Green:

I'll be honest with you, I picked up that characteristic, you know, from the athletic side of things, as I would start my day at that time around four 30 and be out on the track and, you know, get my early workout.

Joel Green:

And I used to tell myself the earlier I began, the more training I can get in throughout the day, the more training equates to.

Joel Green:

Me improving.

Joel Green:

I carry literally the same mentality in business now, uh, that I carry as an athlete.

Dan Moore:

You know, part of your interesting background is the fact that you played professional sports in Europe.

Dan Moore:

You played in Ireland, a couple of other countries.

Dan Moore:

What are some of the insights you got from coaching styles that people in other countries might practice that, that maybe people in America just don't listen to that much or know

Joel Green:

much?

Joel Green:

I saw a bro that they're very, very regimen like.

Joel Green:

We would do something a thousand times and I loved it.

Joel Green:

That's the way I train.

Joel Green:

Now, I'll be honest, a lot of the ways that I run my business and the way I train different athletes is I picked up a number of those characteristics from Europe.

Joel Green:

We would literally go into practice and some of our training sessions and work on two things here in America.

Joel Green:

We may work on about four to five things that work out over there.

Joel Green:

We worked on about two.

Joel Green:

They wanted us to get it down that day, so we would do it hundreds of times that one workout, just to make sure we were comfortable enough by the end of that workout to properly execute whatever we were taught.

Joel Green:

That mentality over there of perfection rapidly, you know, versus over here to where it's a bit more gradual, a little more intense, I feel like over here.

Joel Green:

As far as the athletic side, but I saw the, the regiment side over there was just a little different and, uh, it, it added to me because I was able to bring the attributes from here in America and also pick up on things over there.

Joel Green:

So it, it helped me to become a melting pot of, of, you know, some great tools.

Joel Green:

That's

Dan Moore:

good.

Dan Moore:

And probably those people in Ireland that never met a guy from North Philly.

Dan Moore:

Never.

Dan Moore:

No,

Joel Green:

never.

Joel Green:

That was the funny thing, man.

Joel Green:

Just, just relating to one another.

Joel Green:

It was, it was a challenge at first, I'll admit.

Joel Green:

Um, but I mean, we, we loved each.

Joel Green:

After.

Joel Green:

While it was a huge culture shock for me, it was my first time in being over there and number one, the environment was a culture shock.

Joel Green:

It rained every, my first four months there.

Joel Green:

It rained every day and uh, I mean literally not in, I'm not exaggerating, it rained at some point every single day.

Joel Green:

I said, okay, now wonder's.

Joel Green:

So green over here.

Joel Green:

It's just everything they water

Joel Green:

. Dan Moore: Well, a couple things I wanted to ask you about.

Joel Green:

You have a philosophy that the fund doesn't come first.

Joel Green:

We need to stop looking at the struggle as something that's a negative.

Joel Green:

Could you expand on that for us?

Joel Green:

Absolutely.

Joel Green:

You know, for me the struggle is truly that's where the fruit is.

Joel Green:

You know, we, we don't always realize it cuz it hurts.

Joel Green:

The struggle is usually painful.

Joel Green:

The strength, the struggle is difficult.

Joel Green:

There's always something on the other side, and usually on the other side of a struggle, it's something good because it can't go any worse, you know?

Joel Green:

So it's like when people could have had the proper, Perspective and vantage point and see a struggle as, okay, I'm going get, I'm not, when I'm in it, I'm gonna get through it, because on the other side, it has to be something better.

Joel Green:

You're already at the bottom.

Joel Green:

That's how I look at a struggle, like, okay, I'm in it.

Joel Green:

It's tough, it's difficult.

Joel Green:

It is.

Joel Green:

It's a challenge.

Joel Green:

But man, if I just continue to persist, If I just dare myself to keep moving forward in some form, in some fashion, it's a guarantee.

Joel Green:

I dare.

Joel Green:

It's a guarantee of something good coming up if I continue to move forward.

Joel Green:

If I don't move forward, I may be stuck in this bad place for a really long time.

Joel Green:

The fun not coming first.

Joel Green:

That's what it's about.

Joel Green:

I lean into the process of, I fully embraced the process of, of whatever it takes to get.

Joel Green:

The greater side of the greater good little things.

Joel Green:

You know, me waking up, perfect example.

Joel Green:

Me waking up at, you know, 5:00 AM to work out.

Joel Green:

That's not fun.

Joel Green:

You know, uh, that's not an enjoyable thing.

Joel Green:

I, I will be the first to say like, I enjoy, you know, I feel like I'm in pretty good shape.

Joel Green:

I enjoy the results of training and working out more than I do working out, and I want to enjoy the results of it.

Joel Green:

That side is fun for.

Joel Green:

But the fun doesn't come first.

Joel Green:

The fun comes through working hard, getting in the gym and doing X, Y, Z, so that you know, you can enjoy the, the fruitful and fun side after the fact.

Dan Moore:

Yeah.

Dan Moore:

You know, one thing I'm really impressed with what you just said, Joel, is when you spoke about why not keep going in the struggle, cuz it can't get me worse.

Dan Moore:

It can only get better, but if I stop, it may stay worse.

Dan Moore:

Exactly.

Dan Moore:

It's like the old saying, when you're going through, hell keep.

Dan Moore:

Amazing.

Joel Green:

Exactly.

Dan Moore:

Funny, you also have a, a statement.

Dan Moore:

You say, real life makes an impact.

Dan Moore:

Stop living through false narratives.

Joel Green:

There's so many false narratives out there.

Joel Green:

We're, we're, we're in a day and age, you know, with social media, and I dare say so many false certs, you know, to where things appear perfect.

Joel Green:

You know, we, we wanna live the perfect life.

Joel Green:

We wanna be perfect individuals.

Joel Green:

Don't try to be perfect.

Joel Green:

You know what I mean?

Joel Green:

The real side of things includes imperfection.

Joel Green:

Embrace your imperfections, embrace your insec.

Joel Green:

And I can speak on this now cause I lived it.

Joel Green:

I've been very insecure.

Joel Green:

I have had anxieties as a result of my insecurity.

Joel Green:

So that's like just doubling up took me a while to finally say, you know what, dude, being imperfect, it's okay.

Joel Green:

You're human.

Joel Green:

And it didn't, I didn't realize that until I began finally expressing my imperfections.

Joel Green:

It's expressing my insecurities to other.

Joel Green:

And that was exactly the moment when I began to see, oh, other people are also imperfect in this area, also insecure in that area.

Joel Green:

And I began embracing my insecurities.

Joel Green:

I say, okay, I'm not perfect here.

Joel Green:

You know what?

Joel Green:

Now I, I start to realize every imperfection or every insecurity is nothing but grounds and the foundation for every improvement.

Joel Green:

So it was like every improvement starts somewhere.

Joel Green:

It usually starts with the insecurity of some sort, or starts with the imper.

Joel Green:

Embrace 'em and just build upon 'em if you actually have to or just accept those things.

Dan Moore:

You know, so many people, I think particularly young people are caught up in their image because they look at somebody else's social media posts where their image looks so glamorous, their life looks so much fun, and inevitably we make comparisons and we end up feeling a little bit short, which makes us feel worse, doesn't get any better.

Dan Moore:

We're

Joel Green:

put here to be us.

Joel Green:

You know, you're put here just to be you.

Joel Green:

You know?

Joel Green:

I'm put here just to be me, and obviously us being.

Joel Green:

We're put here to help influence and impact other people.

Joel Green:

We're not just put here for ourselves, but we are put here to be ourselves.

Joel Green:

When we're trying to be everyone else or everything else, we can tell inside our, our heart, our, our conviction tells us we're not being truly who we are.

Joel Green:

I'll be honest.

Joel Green:

I, I have to remind myself of this date, you know, often no be.

Joel Green:

Say what you would say, do what you would do and uh, you know, I have the most comfort at that point,

Dan Moore:

which I guess is another benefit of staying busy.

Dan Moore:

Cuz when you have a lot on you, there's just not enough energy to be somebody else and be yourself,

Joel Green:

That's, you're speaking the truth.

Joel Green:

I mean, that's, that's man, I mean, yeah, you don't have the time to, to fake it.

Joel Green:

You don't have time to be, you know, outside of who you naturally are.

Joel Green:

And that's, that's so.

Joel Green:

Yeah.

Joel Green:

Well,

Dan Moore:

I, I dig that, that makes a lot of sense.

Dan Moore:

Sure.

Dan Moore:

One other quick question.

Dan Moore:

You, you talk about how you can train our brains to default to something instead of making excuses to default to some different pattern there.

Dan Moore:

What, what do you mean by train our brain into different default mode?

Joel Green:

I mean that, that's the key thing.

Joel Green:

You know, that's something I've had to work on, I still work on as far as training myself to, to have my, my most ideal reaction by default, I've had talks with people to where it's like, you wanna respond instead of reacting, right?

Joel Green:

So you wanna have a greater response because a reaction is literally an action based off of what someone else made you do.

Joel Green:

Mm-hmm.

Joel Green:

. So that means they're in essence, controlling what you do.

Joel Green:

Mm-hmm.

Joel Green:

, and I don't like that.

Joel Green:

I don't like always reacting because now I'm not in full control of my actions.

Joel Green:

So I choose and prefer to respond cause I feel like that's coming from me and that comes by way of me training myself.

Joel Green:

You know, going through different situations to where I say, okay, take a quick second before you even have a response of any sort.

Joel Green:

That way won't come out as an impulsive reaction.

Joel Green:

Training your default is not easy.

Joel Green:

It's not an easy thing to do.

Joel Green:

It takes you taking a moment before even acting any way, just breathing, stopping and thinking for a.

Joel Green:

We can think over 30 thoughts every second.

Joel Green:

You know, every minute.

Joel Green:

Rather we can think up, you know, if we just take a minute, we can have so many thoughts, but we choose not to have to take a minute just to kind of process things to breathe.

Joel Green:

And for me that was one of the main ways I trained.

Joel Green:

My default response to my default thinking was, okay, when something happens, take a moment for yourself to just process it.

Joel Green:

Literally take a minute, take, you know, 30.

Joel Green:

and see what you can come up with before you get back to the other person, before you react.

Joel Green:

That way you'll have a better

Dan Moore:

response.

Dan Moore:

Mm-hmm.

Dan Moore:

, because that react is kind of a primitive reaction to, to whatever's going on the fight or flight triggers, and we just absolutely, later on usually regret when we

Joel Green:

when.

Joel Green:

Absolutely.

Joel Green:

And I know because I, you know, I, I've had plenty of regrets based off of, you know, negative reactions.

Joel Green:

So I said, man, I have to stop

Dan Moore:

that.

Dan Moore:

Oh, I think that's f.

Dan Moore:

Joel, one of the kind of big category things I hope you could touch on is some words of encouragement.

Dan Moore:

You know, we, we've got listeners from all around the world, some of whom are just trucking through life.

Dan Moore:

Things are just going brilliantly for them.

Dan Moore:

They're happy with everything.

Dan Moore:

On the other end of the spectrum, we got some people right now that are really struggling.

Dan Moore:

They're just really down, really discouraged.

Dan Moore:

What advice would you give to somebody that just doesn't know what to do?

Joel Green:

Next?

Joel Green:

Question.

Joel Green:

The situation, you know, as opposed to just questioning why me or why God, or if they're religious, you know, whatever the case.

Joel Green:

Question the situation, but when painful circumstances come my way, I don't always just question the surface of what's going on.

Joel Green:

I try, it's not always easy, but I try to, to ask myself, what can I get from this?

Joel Green:

I know this is, you know, Happening to me, but can I change my vantage point to see if it's happening for me?

Joel Green:

And that's a big thing because when we're emotional, where we're in our feelings for too long, we forget that there's another side to what we're going through or potentially another side if it doesn't seem that way.

Joel Green:

But when you begin to question the situation, As opposed to just questioning the surface of it, oh, why did they do that to me?

Joel Green:

Or why is this dawn?

Joel Green:

Or Why did my boss do the things like that?

Joel Green:

That's the surface.

Joel Green:

If you start to hold yourself accountable a little bit more and say, okay, what can I do to change right now that can help influence a change within what I'm going through?

Joel Green:

When we change the things around us change.

Joel Green:

So if you lean into the situation and question the situation and say, okay, how can I change right now to help potentially better this situation?

Joel Green:

I, I, I know you'll come up with great answers.

Joel Green:

You'll come up with different people to reach out to, you'll start to realize that you have help because you'll start to come up, you'll start to brainstorm.

Joel Green:

That's what truly what's taking place.

Joel Green:

That's what filtering is.

Joel Green:

Filtering is a creative brainstorming process to where you, again, you break the situation down, you question the situation so that you begin to really draw out.

Joel Green:

Their fruits from that situation, you start to have things revealed to you like, oh, wow, I didn't think about that.

Joel Green:

You know what?

Joel Green:

I met that person three months ago that I could actually, they gave me their card.

Joel Green:

I could reach out to them.

Joel Green:

Now they, they're a therapist or, okay, they're in that business.

Joel Green:

I'm struggling in my business right now on this facet, but they can help fill that void.

Joel Green:

But it takes us leaning into the situation and questioning how can we become better right then and there while everything feels.

Dan Moore:

Woo man, that is so great.

Dan Moore:

Cuz what it's saying is if people to treat themselves like they're a victim of a circumstance, they're never gonna get past it Absolut.

Dan Moore:

But if instead they ask the question, what can I change about me?

Dan Moore:

Cause I think about how many times I personally have kind of shaken my fist at the world and said, this isn't fair.

Dan Moore:

Was is this happening?

Dan Moore:

Shouldn't be, but that doesn't get us anywhere.

Joel Green:

That's the main thing I never forget.

Joel Green:

And this.

Joel Green:

In my mind, awful.

Joel Green:

When I was 17 years old, I lost my, tragically lost one of my older brothers.

Joel Green:

I, I was mad at the world.

Joel Green:

I was mad at . Just life for a moment.

Joel Green:

I, I dare say I was mad at God, you know, and I'm a religious person and I never questioned God like that.

Joel Green:

I never questioned the world like that.

Joel Green:

I never questioned myself, like, why, why is this going on?

Joel Green:

But there were things that he used to tell me to.

Joel Green:

I wasn't doing them at the moment.

Joel Green:

Do better as fool.

Joel Green:

Do better at, you know, if you say you're serious and you want a scholarship to college, you have to do X, Y, and Z.

Joel Green:

He'd been around, he played basketball before me.

Joel Green:

He had a, he had a name for him, something and things like that, so he knew what he was talking about.

Joel Green:

But I took things easy.

Joel Green:

I was a teenager, but when he, when he passed away, I said, okay, after a while, this wasn't immediate, but what can I do, number one, to take my mind off of these things.

Joel Green:

Like I said, I used to set goals as distractions for.

Joel Green:

What can I do to help improve this, this situation that I'm going through that can help alleviate this pain a little bit in the moment?

Joel Green:

I questioned the situation and put myself in the forefront of the change.

Joel Green:

That's when things changed, and I began studying more, and I made the honor roll for the first time in my life.

Joel Green:

This is my senior year of high school.

Joel Green:

It took me 12 years to finally make the honor.

Joel Green:

And I made it two months after he passed away for the first time ever.

Joel Green:

And then I also earned multiple Division one scholarship offers two months later.

Joel Green:

So the moment I held myself accountable for the change that I wanted to see, that's when a change

Dan Moore:

came.

Dan Moore:

Fantastic.

Dan Moore:

Joel.

Dan Moore:

Time with you.

Dan Moore:

Flies my friend.

Dan Moore:

This is just terrific conversation.

Dan Moore:

I want to thank you for everything you've shared.

Dan Moore:

It's inspired me.

Dan Moore:

I know it's inspired our listen.

Joel Green:

Uh, thanks so much.

Joel Green:

I, I really, truly appreciate it.