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Insider Tips: Turning Around Troubled Company Culture
Episode 2512th January 2024 • Connect & Convert: The Sales Accelerator Podcast • Sales RX and Wizard of Ads Employee Optimization
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Business leadership and culture expert Paul Boomer joins Dennis Collins and Leah Bumphry to discuss how to recognize and transform dysfunctional workplace culture into a high-performing environment.

Transcripts

Dennis Collins:

Hello, everyone.

Dennis Collins:

Thanks for tuning in to another episode of Connect and Convert,

Dennis Collins:

where we share insider secrets to small business owners on how to

Dennis Collins:

make your sales grow like lightning.

Dennis Collins:

We have a very special follow up episode.

Dennis Collins:

You may have seen our episode of with Paul Boomer, a conversation with Paul Boomer.

Dennis Collins:

We're going to do part two.

Dennis Collins:

But first of all, let me introduce myself.

Dennis Collins:

I'm Dennis Collins, and my co host is Hi, Leah

Leah Bumphry:

Bumfrey from Sunny Saskatoon.

Dennis Collins:

Hi, I like that, Sunny Saskatoon.

Dennis Collins:

I'll bet I have more sun here than you have, though.

Dennis Collins:

Oh

Leah Bumphry:

We, yeah, this time of

Dennis Collins:

year for sure.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah, for sure.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

So welcome back.

Dennis Collins:

We had an enjoyable, productive conversation with Paul Boomer.

Dennis Collins:

Now, Paul Boomer, let me give you, he's got one of the longest

Dennis Collins:

titles in the world, but I loved reading every bit of it.

Dennis Collins:

It's a good one.

Dennis Collins:

It's employee and leadership optimization, company culture advisor,

Dennis Collins:

wizard of ads, managing partner.

Dennis Collins:

How about that?

Dennis Collins:

And he deserves every bit of that and more.

Dennis Collins:

Okay.

Dennis Collins:

Paul is, someone that I've known for several decades.

Dennis Collins:

Leah, I think you probably just met him recently, but he is a true subject matter

Dennis Collins:

expert on business leadership and culture.

Dennis Collins:

And if you, don't believe me, go to wizardofads.

Dennis Collins:

org.

Dennis Collins:

And when you see a class with his name on it, Take it.

Dennis Collins:

Take it.

Dennis Collins:

It will transform the way you think about leadership and culture.

Dennis Collins:

Okay?

Dennis Collins:

To add to his accolades, one more accolade, hopefully the next time

Dennis Collins:

we interview Paul, will be author.

Dennis Collins:

Yes.

Dennis Collins:

Yes,

Leah Bumphry:

that's right.

Leah Bumphry:

He is working on his book and I'm excited to read that.

Leah Bumphry:

But you know what, anybody who teaches at the Academy, anybody

Leah Bumphry:

who starts dipping their toes into writing, specific to small business.

Leah Bumphry:

It always makes me think of Wizard Academy, the fact that

Leah Bumphry:

they sponsor our podcast.

Leah Bumphry:

They do.

Leah Bumphry:

I they all think small business is what's important.

Leah Bumphry:

And just, if you go onto the website and check out some of the

Leah Bumphry:

courses, Paul's included, wow.

Leah Bumphry:

It is just, what you need to learn is there.

Dennis Collins:

Couldn't agree more.

Dennis Collins:

I have participated in that class and it changed a lot of my old views

Dennis Collins:

for 153 some years that I've held on.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah, it's, going to be 154 soon.

Dennis Collins:

So anyway two other things I want to mention about Paul.

Dennis Collins:

He has two certifications that are very unique.

Dennis Collins:

Most people have heard of the Myers Briggs.

Dennis Collins:

Survey.

Dennis Collins:

Guess what?

Dennis Collins:

He is certified to facilitate a Myers-Briggs survey.

Dennis Collins:

And even more important, he is a certified Leadership circle, facilitator.

Dennis Collins:

And I'm gonna let him tell you about both of those during our chat.

Dennis Collins:

But for now, he's a friend, he's a colleague, but most

Dennis Collins:

importantly Leah, he produces this.

Dennis Collins:

Podcast.

Dennis Collins:

Can you believe it?

Leah Bumphry:

Thank goodness.

Leah Bumphry:

Otherwise, what would we

Dennis Collins:

do?

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

We would do nothing because we would be floundering around

Dennis Collins:

on the ocean of uncertainty.

Dennis Collins:

We would have no idea.

Dennis Collins:

So we want to thank him for that.

Dennis Collins:

But today he is our guest and this is part two.

Dennis Collins:

If you didn't see part one, you got to go back and pick up part one.

Dennis Collins:

Okay.

Dennis Collins:

Because part one was about leadership.

Dennis Collins:

But today.

Dennis Collins:

We're going to focus on business culture.

Dennis Collins:

Now, are you there, Boomer?

Dennis Collins:

We don't see you.

Dennis Collins:

Hello, Paul Boomer.

Dennis Collins:

Did he go out for a cup of coffee?

Dennis Collins:

There

Leah Bumphry:

he comes.

Leah Bumphry:

He's making a grand entrance.

Leah Bumphry:

I love it.

Leah Bumphry:

I love it,

Dennis Collins:

Paul.

Dennis Collins:

Have some fun.

Dennis Collins:

A dramatic reveal.

Dennis Collins:

Yes.

Dennis Collins:

Last time we spoke about the fact that you're a husband, a father, and we talked

Dennis Collins:

a little bit about your personal story.

Dennis Collins:

Do you want to share that again?

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Sure.

Dennis Collins:

Well, which part of it, but I'll, so there's so many things.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah, there

Dennis Collins:

are.

Dennis Collins:

But you mentioned your wife and your your family, and that was, a nice.

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

So I'll go back to the previous episode and you asked me what,

Dennis Collins:

why am I doing this thing?

Dennis Collins:

It it goes down to my life experiences and for whatever reason was in special

Dennis Collins:

education, which is not easy when you're being bullied and, such and

Dennis Collins:

in a very large school, you And then you find yourself a lot of times

Dennis Collins:

being in leadership positions, and you're like, why am I don't get it.

Dennis Collins:

And I've never understood why I was put in so many leadership,

Dennis Collins:

positions during my, education.

Dennis Collins:

And then, unfortunately a few years ago, my wife was diagnosed

Dennis Collins:

with breast cancer and then metastatic breast cancer after that.

Dennis Collins:

A few years after that, my, my father, unfortunately passed away suddenly.

Dennis Collins:

And that topic by the way is mental health is very dear to me because when he was

Dennis Collins:

working for the one company he worked for his entire life he had some rough

Dennis Collins:

spots that caused some issues to happen.

Dennis Collins:

And in our conversations, his, my conversations, it surrounded around

Dennis Collins:

leadership and where he's been in such.

Dennis Collins:

And since his passing, I've really just said, you know what?

Dennis Collins:

I want to become.

Dennis Collins:

Who I've always been, which makes very little sense the way

Dennis Collins:

I said it, but understanding, Hey, I have this thing over here.

Dennis Collins:

I'm not using it.

Dennis Collins:

I want to start using it now because as you can see as I light up when

Dennis Collins:

I start talking about these topics.

Dennis Collins:

So I know earlier off air, we were talking about my my wife and how

Dennis Collins:

she's doing, wonderful actually.

Dennis Collins:

And lots of little stories.

Dennis Collins:

The best story I can tell you right now is she's always been

Dennis Collins:

in these weird categories of 0.

Dennis Collins:

2 percent chance of this or that.

Dennis Collins:

She's actually now in the, I don't know what you'd call it, but very

Dennis Collins:

small, percentage of somebody who might be cured of cancer.

Dennis Collins:

Ooh.

Dennis Collins:

Wow.

Dennis Collins:

And that's a long story, but it's, it is possible that she might

Dennis Collins:

actually be cured of metastatic, which is traditionally uncurable.

Dennis Collins:

Boy, is that great news?

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Wow.

Dennis Collins:

I can't.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

You have been, an outstanding partner and supporter and advocate.

Dennis Collins:

You, you advocate in social media for the husband, the partner

Dennis Collins:

the spouse of the cancer victim.

Dennis Collins:

I know that you advocate for your wife and so good on you.

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Don't forget about my kids.

Dennis Collins:

Oh, I know.

Dennis Collins:

Oh I don't, forget them.

Dennis Collins:

I happen to, I don't know Paige but oh, I shouldn't say the name on there.

Dennis Collins:

That's alright.

Dennis Collins:

That's alright.

Dennis Collins:

Your daughter she has helped me out in creating some nice.

Dennis Collins:

Gifts for clients.

Dennis Collins:

So yes, we know about page.

Dennis Collins:

But anyway, we digress.

Dennis Collins:

Let us jump headfirst into culture.

Dennis Collins:

Paul, that word culture when I ran radio stations for all those years, and you

Dennis Collins:

listen to all the gurus and all the Smart people with the big brains and Harvard and

Dennis Collins:

Wharton and MIT and all these, the culture word, man, is that word thrown around?

Dennis Collins:

Can you give our listeners a solid working definition of what in the

Dennis Collins:

hell is business culture anyway?

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: The easiest way to put it is it's what

Dennis Collins:

happens when the boss is gone.

Dennis Collins:

That's it.

Dennis Collins:

What happens when the boss is gone?

Dennis Collins:

Now, that is a very short explanation of what it is.

Dennis Collins:

But it encompasses everything that goes into culture.

Dennis Collins:

Which is a lot of the assumed processes.

Dennis Collins:

Which includes a lot of the, The underlying flow of why and

Dennis Collins:

how people do what they do.

Dennis Collins:

Lots of assumptions.

Dennis Collins:

And the way the communication style, everything, there's so

Dennis Collins:

many things that go into it.

Dennis Collins:

So that's why I just shrunk it down to what happens when the boss is gone.

Dennis Collins:

So

Leah Bumphry:

based on that, you're telling me that every

Leah Bumphry:

business has a culture.

Leah Bumphry:

Even if they don't have one that they've defined or am I misunderstanding?

Leah Bumphry:

Paul M. Boomer: No, you're absolutely right.

Leah Bumphry:

And that's one of the biggest things that I find is.

Leah Bumphry:

Because culture than the word and everything is seen as that fluffy thing.

Leah Bumphry:

I don't need to really worry about, I don't know, I don't know what it is.

Leah Bumphry:

I don't, I'm not a people person, whatever it is, what they

Leah Bumphry:

typically don't understand is you have a culture regardless if

Leah Bumphry:

you put effort into it or not.

Leah Bumphry:

The difference is, and this is something that, that just eats me a little bit

Leah Bumphry:

is there's no bad or good culture.

Leah Bumphry:

Did you know that there's no bad or good.

Leah Bumphry:

There is a functional or a dysfunctional culture.

Leah Bumphry:

You can still run and operate a business as a dish with a dysfunctional culture.

Leah Bumphry:

Now you're handcuffed a little bit, but you can still run it.

Leah Bumphry:

And there are many organizations that have a dysfunctional

Leah Bumphry:

culture and are doing great.

Leah Bumphry:

So

Dennis Collins:

now that you mentioned that, can you give us.

Dennis Collins:

It's an example of a dysfunctional culture and what does it look like?

Dennis Collins:

What does it feel like?

Dennis Collins:

And how does it affect the business?

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Dennis, I might need to go get a dinner and I'll be back.

Dennis Collins:

I know this goes on, but I'll, explain briefly.

Dennis Collins:

I have one in mind.

Dennis Collins:

I want to have two or we only have two or three hours to go.

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Okay.

Dennis Collins:

The.

Dennis Collins:

One that comes to mind is a current client and they have, an an owner

Dennis Collins:

who is, and actually this is the same client I mentioned in past podcasts.

Dennis Collins:

I'll just let that be known.

Dennis Collins:

Do you want me to go talk about another one?

Dennis Collins:

Whichever one

Leah Bumphry:

comes to mind.

Dennis Collins:

There's just so many

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: that come to mind.

Dennis Collins:

I just, I, yeah.

Dennis Collins:

You could, any one you want.

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: I'll just pick them.

Dennis Collins:

I'll just pick on them.

Dennis Collins:

Because they love me and I love them.

Dennis Collins:

I won't tell.

Dennis Collins:

The owner is I would say, if he were to talk to their

Dennis Collins:

employees, he's a control freak.

Dennis Collins:

And, he wants to know every single thing that's happening and jumps in on, in his

Dennis Collins:

parachute Fixes everything in his mind and bails and then the managers have to

Dennis Collins:

go in and fix everything that they might be able to knowing that this person might

Dennis Collins:

come back and do it again and that's just at the very top of this pinnacle

Dennis Collins:

mountain of culture and what that does that specific culture is it puts doubt in

Dennis Collins:

everybody's mind am I doing my job right?

Dennis Collins:

Okay.

Dennis Collins:

Because you now have a boss who comes in, does it for you almost tells you how

Dennis Collins:

to do it, tells you how not to do it.

Dennis Collins:

You're doing something that probably is the best way to do it for whatever.

Dennis Collins:

That's why they hired you.

Dennis Collins:

But then they're being told no, That way I'm the boss do my way.

Dennis Collins:

It creates toxic relationships.

Dennis Collins:

And again, they're successful business, but they are a dysfunctional culture.

Leah Bumphry:

Okay.

Leah Bumphry:

So how would that be turned around to be a positive culture?

Leah Bumphry:

I want to use the same example.

Leah Bumphry:

You think it's an owner that cares, right?

Leah Bumphry:

This owner cares what's going on.

Leah Bumphry:

Paul M. Boomer: That's the key.

Leah Bumphry:

That's the key is when a dysfunctional organization culture is operating

Leah Bumphry:

and they're making money and they're, happy and such, they don't

Leah Bumphry:

see a reason to fix this thing.

Leah Bumphry:

It's hard for them to want to, because they're like, Oh, we're fine.

Leah Bumphry:

We're good.

Leah Bumphry:

I'm I'm a good boss.

Leah Bumphry:

That actually reminds me of another one of, which is important.

Leah Bumphry:

This is also another very common thing.

Leah Bumphry:

I'll get back to you that answer there, Leah.

Leah Bumphry:

Sorry.

Leah Bumphry:

My mind goes all over because I'm the CEO that I met was talking and he was really

Leah Bumphry:

proud of himself in the organization for.

Leah Bumphry:

Shifting everything in his plan, business plan when COVID hit he was just proud

Leah Bumphry:

and he should be because he, skyrocketed his his, revenue and everything.

Leah Bumphry:

And then it was a group of us and somebody asked him, so what about your, employees?

Leah Bumphry:

How do you manage them?

Leah Bumphry:

Oh, we're good.

Leah Bumphry:

we we, didn't touch that.

Leah Bumphry:

We've never touched that because it works so well,

Leah Bumphry:

but you know what?

Leah Bumphry:

I started to snoop around a little bit and started to ask

Leah Bumphry:

some questions of employees.

Leah Bumphry:

They looked happy.

Leah Bumphry:

They look like they're excited to be working and such.

Leah Bumphry:

But when you secretly ask them, Hey, what's it like to work here?

Leah Bumphry:

Oh, no, I'm getting out of here as soon as I can.

Leah Bumphry:

As soon as I find another job, I'm leaving.

Leah Bumphry:

Why is that?

Leah Bumphry:

And they'd explain all these things.

Leah Bumphry:

A lot of it had to go with micromanaging.

Leah Bumphry:

So that CEO was blind to the fact.

Leah Bumphry:

That he could be better by looking at culture.

Leah Bumphry:

Now, the way you look at culture and accelerate it, or look at it, Leah,

Leah Bumphry:

and turn it to the positive is that CEO, president, leader, whatever,

Leah Bumphry:

they have to be willing to look in the mirror and ask themselves, what am I

Leah Bumphry:

contributing positively and negatively?

Leah Bumphry:

How am I helping this boat go faster?

Leah Bumphry:

How am I possibly hindering it from going faster?

Leah Bumphry:

Until they do that culture is, gonna be managed not by them, which by the way,

Leah Bumphry:

it can be managed not by that leader.

Leah Bumphry:

Actually, they are managing it, they just don't know it, but it's

Leah Bumphry:

being managed by the employees.

Dennis Collins:

Would Paul, would that be would you consider

Dennis Collins:

that man culture by default?

Dennis Collins:

Or, it's just the way things are done around here, but nobody planned it.

Dennis Collins:

It's just the way it is.

Dennis Collins:

Is that, yeah.

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: That's a great phrase, Dennis culture by default

Dennis Collins:

is this is just the way it is and we're not willing to adjust because

Dennis Collins:

and that's, a blind spot.

Dennis Collins:

Is it not?

Dennis Collins:

That's a huge blind spot.

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Yeah, it is a huge blind spot,

Dennis Collins:

not able to be easily seen and clearly not something that's top

Dennis Collins:

of mind with most small business owners.

Dennis Collins:

Would that be fair to say?

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Absolutely.

Dennis Collins:

It goes back to that thing about we're making money.

Dennis Collins:

So why do I need to focus on culture?

Dennis Collins:

But let me tell you,

Dennis Collins:

let me Yeah, go ahead, answer that

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: question.

Dennis Collins:

Go.

Dennis Collins:

I think I know where you're going already, but go for it.

Dennis Collins:

I was,

Dennis Collins:

going to ask you that question that you just posed.

Dennis Collins:

Hey, we're doing great.

Dennis Collins:

Why should I worry about this culture crap?

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: Gee, Dennis, it's like we're on a show together or something.

Dennis Collins:

We do stuff together.

Dennis Collins:

I'm just

Leah Bumphry:

glad one of you asked the question already, because

Leah Bumphry:

I was getting ready to do it.

Leah Bumphry:

The

Leah Bumphry:

Paul M. Boomer: question, the question.

Leah Bumphry:

What was the question?

Dennis Collins:

We're making a lot of money.

Dennis Collins:

Everything is rosy.

Dennis Collins:

Why in the, should I go to this culture nonsense?

Dennis Collins:

I don't understand it anyway.

Dennis Collins:

So why

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: bother?

Dennis Collins:

Why bother?

Dennis Collins:

You built a company for a reason, right?

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

I have never met somebody who has a reason and says, eh, I want to work on it.

Dennis Collins:

I really don't want to.

Dennis Collins:

I'm passionate about it.

Dennis Collins:

Eh.

Dennis Collins:

But I'm not willing to.

Dennis Collins:

Be better or help others be better within my organization.

Dennis Collins:

When you work on culture, when you are self reflective, what happens in

Dennis Collins:

a business is a accelerates profits.

Dennis Collins:

It's just, there's no question about it because people are

Dennis Collins:

more willing to be productive.

Dennis Collins:

They want to be productive.

Dennis Collins:

People are willing and wanting to come to work.

Dennis Collins:

They want to come to work because it matters to them.

Dennis Collins:

And if it matters to them, they're willing to bend over backwards to

Dennis Collins:

do some work and it becomes easier to keep them and it becomes easier

Dennis Collins:

to read, to to recruit new people.

Dennis Collins:

And with that, and, yeah, that's what I'm talking about.

Dennis Collins:

There's so many things of why you do this.

Dennis Collins:

And when you do that, you read, you increase your profit margin because

Dennis Collins:

you're not having to hire people all the time and retrain them.

Dennis Collins:

Which.

Dennis Collins:

Depending on your industry absolute minimum is at least

Dennis Collins:

4, 000 per person to train.

Dennis Collins:

So

Leah Bumphry:

this isn't a bunch of fluffy.

Leah Bumphry:

Oh, Kumbaya.

Leah Bumphry:

Let's all have a group hug here.

Leah Bumphry:

There are solid business reasons why you want to be able to change

Leah Bumphry:

your non functional culture into a functional culture.

Leah Bumphry:

Paul M. Boomer: Absolutely.

Leah Bumphry:

And for any business owner, it usually comes down to revenue and profit,

Leah Bumphry:

margins, because they want to, please their stakeholders, whoever it is.

Leah Bumphry:

Let it be the org, the employees themselves, let it be their

Leah Bumphry:

peers, let it be a board of directors, let it be the community.

Dennis Collins:

So Paul, let's say you have made the unfortunate discovery

Dennis Collins:

that you have a dysfunctional culture.

Dennis Collins:

How easy is it and how, I know we could spend days on this,

Dennis Collins:

but in brief, how easy is it?

Dennis Collins:

What's the way to make it a functional culture?

Dennis Collins:

How do

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: we do that?

Dennis Collins:

First, look at yourself, look at your, organization.

Dennis Collins:

My recommendation is for you as the boss to, to walk literally away

Dennis Collins:

from the business for a few days and, reflect on what am I doing?

Dennis Collins:

What am I not doing?

Dennis Collins:

And while you are doing that, you pose that same question to your leadership

Dennis Collins:

team and they do the same thing of, okay, how am I contributing or not contributing

Dennis Collins:

such, and then you set a time.

Dennis Collins:

That all of you sit down away from the company, not in your office, but

Dennis Collins:

actually outside and have a frank and honest conversation with each other.

Dennis Collins:

That's the, that's it.

Dennis Collins:

And then there's many steps after that.

Dennis Collins:

It becomes down to change management and processes and such, and

Dennis Collins:

what exactly needs to change.

Dennis Collins:

But that is what I'd recommend for somebody who wants to do it.

Dennis Collins:

Do it themselves is just start understanding.

Dennis Collins:

Hey, I have a contribution in this.

Leah Bumphry:

And I have to be some, there has to be some solid ground rules

Leah Bumphry:

though, because it's, you talked about establishing that trust, because if

Leah Bumphry:

I'm going to tell Dennis at Dennis, I don't like when you wear that red

Leah Bumphry:

and white checkered shirt, I had to know, Dennis, isn't going to be mad

Leah Bumphry:

at me and say, Lee, I don't like when you wear that black, one all the time.

Leah Bumphry:

There's gotta be, you gotta establish the ground rules here, I would think.

Leah Bumphry:

Paul M. Boomer: Yeah.

Leah Bumphry:

And that's, it goes in sync with that conversation is if.

Leah Bumphry:

You are not sure if you don't know, if you have psychological safety, a ask,

Leah Bumphry:

honestly, your leadership team should be a leadership team that you're willing

Leah Bumphry:

to have frank conversations with, right?

Leah Bumphry:

Why would you want them on your leadership team otherwise?

Leah Bumphry:

And ask them or simply ask, Hey, can we honestly tell each other what's going on?

Leah Bumphry:

Do I have your permission?

Leah Bumphry:

Even ask that, do I have your permission to be honest with you?

Leah Bumphry:

That way.

Leah Bumphry:

By the way, Dennis, I like your shirt.

Leah Bumphry:

Just saying, I do

Dennis Collins:

your shirt,

Dennis Collins:

That I was getting very concerned.

Dennis Collins:

I almost started crying.

Dennis Collins:

I, could

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: tell that question myself.

Dennis Collins:

I'm so

Dennis Collins:

sensitive.

Leah Bumphry:

Paul.

Leah Bumphry:

He's so

Dennis Collins:

sensitive.

Dennis Collins:

Oh, I,

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: I don't know the half of it.

Dennis Collins:

153 years old.

Dennis Collins:

Geez.

Dennis Collins:

. Paul M. Boomer: See right here, we have a culture, the three of us.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

. Everybody has a culture

Dennis Collins:

and is it function, is it functional or dysfunctional?

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: It leans on the functional side.

Dennis Collins:

There's some dysfunctions here and there, but

Dennis Collins:

Leans on the functional side.

Dennis Collins:

I

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: like that.

Dennis Collins:

I want a

Dennis Collins:

t shirt.

Dennis Collins:

Very diplomatic answer, Paul.

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: I'll be honest, Leah, I want to answer that, but that is a hard

Dennis Collins:

long answer that requires understanding the organization itself, and every

Dennis Collins:

organization is a little different.

Dennis Collins:

There is no templates or that's how we're going to do it.

Dennis Collins:

The first thing really comes down to that conversation and knowing your

Dennis Collins:

leadership team has your back and you have theirs and they have yours.

Dennis Collins:

But yeah, there is psychological safety that has to come into play to that.

Dennis Collins:

And again, that's why you start at the very top where they're better already.

Dennis Collins:

Be some trust amongst everybody.

Dennis Collins:

Better be.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

It sounds like in our, as per our last episode on leadership.

Dennis Collins:

The, common denominator is it's really hard to do this on your own.

Dennis Collins:

You really need to reach out.

Dennis Collins:

So when they reach out to you, how do they find you?

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: The easiest way is to simply email me.

Dennis Collins:

Paul Paul Boomer at wizard of ads.

Dennis Collins:

com.

Dennis Collins:

I forgot my email address.

Dennis Collins:

Paulboomeratwizardofads.

Dennis Collins:

com or go to wizardofads.

Dennis Collins:

com and look under the partners list and you'll see me in there.

Dennis Collins:

Those are the two easiest ways to get ahold of me.

Dennis Collins:

Now, by the way, earlier, you as your producer, I'm going to say something.

Dennis Collins:

Oh, we're

Dennis Collins:

going to get some notes.

Dennis Collins:

We're going to get some notes, Leah.

Dennis Collins:

Be

Leah Bumphry:

prepared.

Leah Bumphry:

We knew it was.

Leah Bumphry:

We knew

Leah Bumphry:

Paul M. Boomer: it was coming.

Leah Bumphry:

Because we can do this because we trust each other.

Leah Bumphry:

I noticed that you said wizard of ads.

Leah Bumphry:

org for Wizard Academy.

Dennis Collins:

Oh gosh.

Dennis Collins:

I just, that's a terrible, so am I.

Dennis Collins:

It's, am I gonna get

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: fired?

Dennis Collins:

, but it's wizard academy.org.

Dennis Collins:

academy.org.

Dennis Collins:

Yes.

Dennis Collins:

Wizard academy.org is where you'll find it's wizard of

Dennis Collins:

ads.com for the email.

Dennis Collins:

But wizard academy.org for the academy.

Dennis Collins:

You got

Dennis Collins:

Paul M. Boomer: it.

Dennis Collins:

And that there, which you did.

Dennis Collins:

Yeah.

Dennis Collins:

Is another way to get a hold of me.

Dennis Collins:

Like you said, I have a course on cultural leadership and teamwork.

Dennis Collins:

And the last time, the inaugural I had so much peop so many of the people saying,

Dennis Collins:

When you do the next one, let me know.

Dennis Collins:

Yes.

Dennis Collins:

And that would come

Dennis Collins:

in as well.

Dennis Collins:

I knew you got a lot, I knew you got a lot of good feedback.

Dennis Collins:

Both, cause I was at that class.

Dennis Collins:

Yes.

Dennis Collins:

You got feedback both right then and there and afterwards.

Dennis Collins:

You had people reaching out to you.

Dennis Collins:

Which, to me, is the mark of a great course.

Dennis Collins:

So when you see that course come up, wizardacademy.

Dennis Collins:

org, go take it.

Dennis Collins:

Paul, thank you.

Dennis Collins:

Again, we could spend more hours and hours, but again,

Dennis Collins:

we've reached our time limit.

Dennis Collins:

So what can I say?

Dennis Collins:

You're a subject matter expert.

Dennis Collins:

You've shared a big piece of your brain with us that has inspired

Dennis Collins:

and informed and encouraged.

Dennis Collins:

Thank you for being our producer and what you know about

Dennis Collins:

business culture and leadership.

Dennis Collins:

That's this episode of Connect and Convert.

Dennis Collins:

Stay tuned, because we're going to be back shortly.

Dennis Collins:

Stay tuned.

Dennis Collins:

Bye.

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