Artwork for podcast Bitcoin Homeschoolers
₿HS004: Overcoming the Fear of Overwhelm
Episode 412th October 2023 • Bitcoin Homeschoolers • Scott and Tali Lindberg
00:00:00 00:31:41

Share Episode

Shownotes

SHOW TOPIC:

Homeschooling is a commitment.  You are investing your precious time and attention for the long-term success and happiness of your children.  In this conversation, Tali and Scott deep dive the common fear of being overwhelmed.

IN THIS EPISODE, YOU'LL LEARN:

  • A common question from those considering homeschooling is how to not lose yourself
  • Homeschooling is not as hard as you might think
  • It’s okay if spouses don’t agree on all aspects (feature not a bug)
  • You have a lot of options, each with varying impacts on time for yourself
  • Just start … then adjust.  It’s a process you continually tweak.
  • You don’t need to have plan for entire K-12 experience.  Planning out a month or two in advance is fine.
  • Part-time private schools are one option
  • Co-ops offer additional benefit, the opportunity to share your passions
  • Extended family plans
  • Homeschooling play groups and field trips
  • Every homeschooling mom, no matter how devoted needs time to herself to recoup and regenerate
  • There are so many resources:  Mom’s groups, churches, online curriculum, etc.
  • Finding homeschooling groups and play groups in your area
  • Always do a tour before committing to a program
  • Consider attending homeschooling conventions
  • Homeschoolers are very much like Bitcoiners.  They're very, very friendly, open, and more than happy to share experience.
  • Stay flexible and know that it's going to be okay. Take one step at a time.

HAPPY TO HELP:

  • Tali's Twitter @OrangeHatterPod
  • Scott's Twitter @ScottLindberg93
  • Scott's nostr npub19jkuyl0wgrj8kccqzh2vnseeql9v98ptrx407ca9qjsrr4x5j9tsnxx0q6
  • Free Market Kids' Twitter @FreeMarketKids
  • Orange Pill App @FreeMarketKids
  • Free Market Kids' games including HODL UP https://www.freemarketkids.com/collections/games

WAYS TO SUPPORT:

We are essentially our own sponsors and are so grateful for all of you who support this show.  Thank you!

STANDING RESOURCE RECOMMENDATIONS:

Transcripts

Speaker:

Well welcome everybody.

2

:

This is exciting.

3

:

We were talking today in Nashville.

4

:

We're visiting Bitcoin park.

5

:

And it's really nice.

6

:

It's a beautiful fall time of the year.

7

:

And one of the things that's

interesting at Bitcoin park is.

8

:

We're seeing people come with

their kids, really young kids.

9

:

Um, infants and it's just inspiring.

10

:

And it reminds us of what

we're doing with this podcast.

11

:

. If you're new, the show husband

and wife team we're Bitcoiners.

12

:

We spent 20 years

homeschooling our four kids.

13

:

And the purpose of this, this podcast is

to share our stories or lessons learned

14

:

and to share any resources we can.

15

:

On self casting education.

16

:

And today we're going to deep dive.

17

:

Something that was a question or

maybe really, really a comment that

18

:

was made to Talia at a recent event.

19

:

So Tali, why don't you tell them?

20

:

Yeah.

21

:

I was talking to a young mom and

she knew that we were homeschoolers

22

:

and she approached us and said, , I

would love to homeschool, but I'm

23

:

afraid that if I choose to do that,

I'm going to lose myself completely.

24

:

They get it.

25

:

It.

26

:

I mean, homeschooling is a.

27

:

Huge undertaking.

28

:

If you're choosing to do a full time.

29

:

I think there is a

spectrum of homeschooling.

30

:

You can do it even if your kids

are going to public school, but

31

:

she was specifically referencing.

32

:

If she were to dive in full time.

33

:

Homeschooling her three kids.

34

:

So today we want to just talk a little

bit about our thoughts on that question.

35

:

A very valid question.

36

:

And.

37

:

Based on not only our personal

experience, but things that we have

38

:

observed over the last two decades.

39

:

We'll share with you and hope

that you will find it helpful.

40

:

All right.

41

:

Well, so.

42

:

Tell us about this

conversation you had then.

43

:

How did the, how did you answer her?

44

:

And we would start there.

45

:

Well, I, I acknowledged her

concern because it is really

46

:

easy when you start as mothers.

47

:

You start to put your

children's needs and wants and.

48

:

Um, Basically, well, just

needs a ones above your own.

49

:

And if you, on top of being a young

mom, And chasing after your kids and

50

:

trying to take care of the house and.

51

:

Grocery shop and make the healthiest

food choices that you can.

52

:

Oh, that's seven.

53

:

And on top of that, having to think

about schooling, your kids, it

54

:

does sound very, very overwhelming.

55

:

And truthfully it is going to

take a lot of mental energy.

56

:

But it does.

57

:

It's not necessarily as hard as you

think it might be because today there

58

:

are so many resources out there.

59

:

Making homeschooling, you have very, very

flexible, very, um, What's it called?

60

:

Not the opposite of one size fits all.

61

:

Personal, it can be.

62

:

It can be very, very

approached, personalized.

63

:

You can, you can tailor, you

can tailor your homeschooling

64

:

according to your resources in time.

65

:

And money and energy and still do a

fabulous job, uh, far superior to.

66

:

What a public school can do.

67

:

Yeah.

68

:

So in my mind, , I see

kind of three steps.

69

:

The first step that I recall is you.

70

:

You need to, you need to have

alignment with your partner.

71

:

On what you're trying to do.

72

:

So you need to.

73

:

At least have a conversation

about what it is, what are those.

74

:

Homeschooling is proof of work.

75

:

You're going to invest your energy.

76

:

That's what you're, you're

making a decision to do.

77

:

But you need to have that

and it's okay to disagree.

78

:

Like don't, I don't think.

79

:

That has to be 100%.

80

:

I think it's actually

a feature, not a bug.

81

:

Uh, for parents too, to work things out.

82

:

And the second thing is.

83

:

Take a, uh, Take a look at what

your options are, because as you

84

:

just said, it's very personal.

85

:

You can do anything from look, we're going

to put them in the public school system.

86

:

We're just going to teach them at

night and on weekends with our,

87

:

with extra stuff, it could be.

88

:

Uh, private school.

89

:

It could be one of these schools

that does does one or two days of.

90

:

A week.

91

:

It could be dropping them

off at a family member.

92

:

You have a lot of options.

93

:

Two.

94

:

To decide.

95

:

How much time you need for yourself.

96

:

So if this person that came to you

is worried about losing herself.

97

:

And being overwhelmed.

98

:

To me, there's this whole second step

of like, you have this menu of options.

99

:

And then the third step is.

100

:

You start, you, you commit to it.

101

:

You start it.

102

:

And then, you know, you can adjust.

103

:

This is not, Hey, I made a decision

and we have to stay this way forever.

104

:

You go on.

105

:

And you learn.

106

:

So the first thing is

you, you get aligned.

107

:

Second thing is you.

108

:

You look at your options.

109

:

And the third thing is you.

110

:

You test them out and, and then

if you say, I want to go deeper on

111

:

this, I want to spend more time.

112

:

Okay.

113

:

Fine.

114

:

You.

115

:

Go more to you.

116

:

Get you get more involved.

117

:

If you say I am feeling overwhelmed.

118

:

I do feel like I'm losing myself.

119

:

You say.

120

:

Let me look at those options.

121

:

That gives me more time.

122

:

You have.

123

:

You have a lot of.

124

:

Opportunity.

125

:

To adjust you don't

you're not locked into it.

126

:

Forever.

127

:

You know, that's, that's kind of

like, that's what I see is the

128

:

kind of from a process standpoint.

129

:

Of what it looks like.

130

:

Well, a lot of homeschooling

families would do this.

131

:

So they start praying.

132

:

If you're a praying kind of person,

they start praying about the school.

133

:

Year over the summer and they make

a decision for that school year.

134

:

And they summer, they try it for

a year and then they always then.

135

:

Pray about the following year.

136

:

So they take it really

one school year at a time.

137

:

It is, it seems so

overwhelming to think K to 12.

138

:

Oh my God.

139

:

I gotta have, I gotta have

this whole long-term plan.

140

:

You don't, you're really planning

about nine months at a time.

141

:

So for example, one year.

142

:

Uh, for our youngest, he was

eight years old at the time.

143

:

And we up until then had been primarily

doing all of the subjects ourselves.

144

:

And I decided if for.

145

:

For, um, just for the

sake of making friends.

146

:

There are his own age.

147

:

Cause he tended to be he's our youngest.

148

:

He's going to, to.

149

:

To be exposed to older kids

through his siblings activity.

150

:

So for his own sake, I wanted to

put him in a situation where he

151

:

was exposed to other homeschoolers.

152

:

He's all age.

153

:

And I was already running around.

154

:

All the all different places

because of the older siblings.

155

:

And I just felt like I wanted to

give him something that was his own.

156

:

And with kids his own age,

Within the social parameter of

157

:

other homeschooling families.

158

:

So I put him in a, what I will call it

a private, a part-time private school.

159

:

So there's two days a week.

160

:

It covered all the subjects.

161

:

It was Tuesday, Thursday,

and then Monday was a Friday.

162

:

He had homework to do, and I

just supervised his homework.

163

:

But Tuesday, Thursday, it

was a drop off situation.

164

:

Right.

165

:

So he was there for, uh, I think

he, we dropped him off at nine

166

:

and we picked him up at three.

167

:

So about six hours included laundry

size and all the different subjects.

168

:

I recovered.

169

:

So he was there for one year and

every day I, when I picked him up,

170

:

we will go over his day as a whole.

171

:

What did you learn?

172

:

Who did you hang out with?

173

:

How was it?

174

:

What was it like with your

friends on the playground?

175

:

What was your teacher like?

176

:

And then of course, I was also

just, uh, overseeing his projects

177

:

and his homework and things.

178

:

And towards the end of the year, actually,

like, it wasn't even towards the end of

179

:

the year, it was halfway through the year

and the school was already preparing to

180

:

do registration for the following year.

181

:

I had to sit down with

my then eight year old.

182

:

Uh, sun and Isaiah, what do you

think, is this something that

183

:

you would like to continue with?

184

:

Are you making.

185

:

Friends.

186

:

And do you feel good there?

187

:

And he said, I don't like it there because

you've put me in a room full of babies.

188

:

And I said, they're not babies.

189

:

They're your age.

190

:

And some of them are older, but

he's so used to being exposed to.

191

:

His oldest siblings and his

older siblings, friends.

192

:

That he felt uncomfortable

there and together we made the

193

:

decision to not continue, but he

had that the nine months there.

194

:

So it's a, it's a process that

you can continue to tweak as you,

195

:

your life circumstances, change.

196

:

And.

197

:

In that case, if he was my oldest, right.

198

:

If I yell, if he had younger

siblings and he was my oldest.

199

:

I could have done the same thing.

200

:

I could have dropped him off Tuesday,

Thursday, and then just knew that

201

:

all the subjects were covered and

then just had to help him with

202

:

homework Monday, Wednesday, Friday.

203

:

And that would give me free time

to take care of the younger kids.

204

:

So this situation could be reversed

in that case, it would work for.

205

:

The family, according to what their need.

206

:

Gotcha.

207

:

So two things come to mind.

208

:

One is that.

209

:

There's other things we can go down and.

210

:

The list of options to choose and what

we either witnessed, or you, you tried.

211

:

And then the other thing is, are we.

212

:

We are answering the question of

what this person asked you in that.

213

:

So did that help you?

214

:

Or would that help the

person who's worried about?

215

:

Being overwhelmed and not, or

didn't want to lose themselves.

216

:

Yes.

217

:

In this case for that particular

family who was asking me this question.

218

:

Her kids were, um, I think

kindergarten and younger.

219

:

And she was pregnant

in the first semester.

220

:

Uh, first trimester.

221

:

So in her case, if she wanted to

go that route, She had a newborn,

222

:

assuming, uh, when, when she

decides you there's the baby's born.

223

:

She has a newborn and then she

has a five-year-old I think it

224

:

might've been a three-year-old.

225

:

Five-year-old three-year-old and a

newborn, then she could have dropped off.

226

:

The failure and the three-year-old

every Tuesday, Thursday, and new that

227

:

a Monday, Wednesday, Friday, she didn't

have to worry about coming up with

228

:

curriculum or coming up with material.

229

:

All she had to do was to supervise

and the rest of the time they can

230

:

just enjoy today and just know

the schooling is taken care of.

231

:

Okay.

232

:

So in that case was she

necessarily lose herself.

233

:

I would say no, as long as the tuition

is something that you can manage.

234

:

And you're okay with them going

into a traditional classrooms

235

:

situation because that's, you

always make a pros and cons list.

236

:

Right?

237

:

So in the case of the example that

I'm giving, which is a part-time.

238

:

Private school situation where

you, you drop off part of the week.

239

:

They are sitting in a traditional

classroom and they, it is a lecture

240

:

lecture based teaching style.

241

:

They, it is texts textbook based.

242

:

So if you don't mind that, then

this is a really great option.

243

:

Okay.

244

:

Cool.

245

:

All right.

246

:

So let's what we'll do is we'll just go

through the list of different options.

247

:

And then we'll just try to come back

to the original question and see

248

:

where we're at rates on the scale.

249

:

So the next one.

250

:

Co-ops and maybe explain

what, what co-ops are.

251

:

And then, and then we tie it

back to the same question of how

252

:

does it help or not help with.

253

:

Your time to yourself

to not lose yourself.

254

:

Yeah, so you can join a homeschool at

co-op and a co-op usually is once a week

255

:

and it's PA it's families coming together.

256

:

So it's not, definitely

not a drop off situation.

257

:

Families come together, parents either.

258

:

Volunteer, uh, as just admin people or

they've volunteered to teach, or they

259

:

volunteer to watch the younger kids who

are not old enough to go into a classroom.

260

:

Then the parents who teach,

they teach based on their own

261

:

interests and backgrounds.

262

:

So you're not going to necessarily

get the academic exposure there

263

:

because you don't from one.

264

:

Year to another.

265

:

You're not sure what

classes would be available.

266

:

Right.

267

:

It would be like one pair and

maybe really loves knitting.

268

:

So she provides a knitting class.

269

:

One parent maybe is really great at math.

270

:

And so he does a math games class.

271

:

One parent may be really

good at cooking or gardening.

272

:

So they do a gardening class.

273

:

So it's more like electives, mostly what

I have seen in homeschooling co-ops.

274

:

The classes are offered by the parents

are mostly more like electives.

275

:

So you're still going to have to teach the

core math and English at home yourself.

276

:

Uh, less there's a parent in the co-op

specifically offering something for that.

277

:

But the benefit of it is the

whole family is together.

278

:

When you have, when

lunchtime comes around.

279

:

All the families are sitting together.

280

:

The kids are playing.

281

:

It's a very family oriented thing, but you

don't get free time in terms of walking

282

:

away, but you do get the friendship

with other homeschooling moms and dads.

283

:

Well, I, I would say the other thing

in context of not losing yourself,

284

:

what you do get is you could

volunteer to teach something you like.

285

:

So if your hobby is ceramics or

painting or whatever your hobby is.

286

:

You volunteered to teach your subject.

287

:

And so now instead of losing.

288

:

You time.

289

:

On something that is part of who you are.

290

:

You actually get to share

that with other other people.

291

:

And while you're doing that, it's sort

of like specialization in a free market.

292

:

You're going to specialize in your area.

293

:

You're really good at.

294

:

Uh, just take a painting.

295

:

If that was your hobby.

296

:

Or maybe it's photography or programming.

297

:

Maybe you can get into

robotics with your kids.

298

:

It doesn't matter.

299

:

Whatever your subject is

that you like to teach about?

300

:

Do you like to spend time on you?

301

:

Go spend time.

302

:

It could be sports too.

303

:

The kids could go play.

304

:

You really like sports.

305

:

So you teach your kids,

flag football or something.

306

:

Kickball the little square game

with the bonk downs, whatever it is.

307

:

And it gives you a little bit of time

to focus on what you like while somebody

308

:

else is going deep on something they like.

309

:

So.

310

:

Maybe you speak Chinese

and you can speak Chinese.

311

:

So that persons over teaching a language

and someone else is doing chemistry.

312

:

So to me, Co-ops.

313

:

You're still spending time, but I

think the benefit on the question

314

:

of how not to lose yourself is.

315

:

You, you also get this, this

opportunity to be who you are and yeah.

316

:

And you can share your passion, which

is, uh, which is a beautiful thing

317

:

in and of itself because yeah, we're

all looking for people who share.

318

:

Our hobby and passion and common interest.

319

:

And you get to teach that

to the younger generation.

320

:

And I think that can be

NSL, very fulfilling.

321

:

And another pro about doing the

homeschooling co-op is your kids are

322

:

also learning from other people who

are passionate about this subject.

323

:

Versus going to a school, maybe

being taught by a teacher who is

324

:

forced to teach something that

they literally have no interest in.

325

:

All right, let's go to the next one.

326

:

The list.

327

:

And this one you may not be able

to do all the time, depending on.

328

:

If you have extended family nearby.

329

:

So we may have to use an example

of what else you've witnessed,

330

:

but the next one on the list is.

331

:

Time with family.

332

:

So for example, you, every

whatever day is the day that

333

:

someone's going to be with grandma.

334

:

That kind of thing.

335

:

I don't think we'll call it this.

336

:

That like an extended family.

337

:

Plan.

338

:

That's the next, that's the next one?

339

:

Yeah, so.

340

:

I knew a family where the grandparents

were really active in the children's

341

:

lives and they would have grandma days.

342

:

And, um, the Gramma day, literally

the mom would drop off the kids, our

343

:

grandma's house, and then she'll have

the day to herself, whether she wanted

344

:

to pursue something that she's interested

in, or just have a quiet house to do

345

:

what she needs to do around the house.

346

:

So that's another way if you wanted

to just school full time yourself,

347

:

but just have one day free to take

care of other things, to still have

348

:

your own space, your own mental space.

349

:

That would really work.

350

:

If you don't have.

351

:

Parents are nearby, or if you don't

have that kind of relationship.

352

:

Or opportunity then perhaps you can, um,

partner with another homeschooling family

353

:

because everybody really needs that.

354

:

Every homeschooling mom, no

matter how devoted needs time.

355

:

To herself to recoup and regenerate.

356

:

We recharge.

357

:

And so if you join a homeschooling

co-op of any kind, or if you join.

358

:

Um, they're always homeschooling

playgroups, especially

359

:

if your kids are young.

360

:

Homeschooling playgroups is a

very, very big thing and they take

361

:

a lots of field trips together.

362

:

You'll get to know other families

and hopefully you make a couple

363

:

close friends and then you can

partner up and share time off.

364

:

You know, and, and that could really,

that can really alleviate that feeling of

365

:

heavy burden when you're homeschooling.

366

:

And you're you feel like you

have to be on all the time.

367

:

Right.

368

:

But playgroups are very, very big thing.

369

:

Moms groups, you can find them everywhere

if you're a part of a church, for sure.

370

:

They have connections to the moms groups.

371

:

There's.

372

:

If you even just Google mom group

in your area, um, they're not

373

:

necessarily necessarily going to

also be homeschooling moms, but.

374

:

. You never know what people are able to.

375

:

Work together to create.

376

:

Okay.

377

:

Then I did.

378

:

Just two more quick and

then we can get into the.

379

:

Where do you start to find

out for your own area?

380

:

Um, on one end of the spectrum.

381

:

And the furthest end might be,

uh, you max out how much time

382

:

somebody else is doing it.

383

:

Like some places you can go.

384

:

And there you're called

homeschoolers, but.

385

:

Like they're basically gone.

386

:

Most of them.

387

:

Yeah.

388

:

Time let's cover that one.

389

:

First.

390

:

I was going to call it a

hundred percent private, but

391

:

that's not really what that is.

392

:

Let's what do you call the most extreme?

393

:

Keys.

394

:

Where.

395

:

You're still homeschooling, but you're

spending the least amount of time.

396

:

Actually doing the schooling.

397

:

Well, you.

398

:

Uh, okay.

399

:

So that's a little bit different from

physical separation, like your ability

400

:

to drop them off and not be worried about

them in that other people are responsible

401

:

for your child during that time.

402

:

And you're completely freed.

403

:

Freed up to do other things,

but if you're, if you're not

404

:

talking about physical separation,

you're just talking about.

405

:

Delegating the task of teaching.

406

:

You can buy these

curriculums either online.

407

:

Where they say, it's almost like

what they did during coven, which is

408

:

all the, all the classes are online.

409

:

You sign them up and they

sign into a life teacher.

410

:

They get taught and they

do their homework and they.

411

:

They get feedback from the teacher.

412

:

They take tests where the

teacher and you're literally just

413

:

providing space in a computer.

414

:

Right.

415

:

And maybe a little bit of supervision.

416

:

Most of the time the kids would be home.

417

:

But you are not responsible for the

teaching of a, you just choose the

418

:

classes that you want them to to learn.

419

:

That's the most extreme, like hands off

thing where you're just not part of that.

420

:

All.

421

:

So my point in bringing that up is that.

422

:

There are some parents who

say they are homeschoolers.

423

:

If you asked them that

those other homeschoolers.

424

:

But they have tried to

outsource to the max.

425

:

Yeah, they don't teach at all.

426

:

Right.

427

:

Yeah.

428

:

Then.

429

:

Then you have the other side

of spectrum, which is the last

430

:

one I wanted to talk about.

431

:

And that was where you just, this

is your you've decided this is

432

:

your passion and your, you actually

want it to be a hundred percent.

433

:

Right.

434

:

So maybe we talk about.

435

:

The other end of the spectrum.

436

:

You have people who.

437

:

Enjoy it so much.

438

:

They, they want to go deep on

everything and be involved with

439

:

literally teaching everything.

440

:

So if they're teaching everything, how

do they still keep a part of themselves?

441

:

Well, I think it's almost, it

almost is it answers itself.

442

:

You've already decided that what

makes you happy is the teaching.

443

:

So you are doing what you like.

444

:

And that sense, right?

445

:

Yeah.

446

:

Um, I just bring it up as it, on

the spectrum of options available.

447

:

That some people will go to the,

go to the other side of this.

448

:

And they enjoy it.

449

:

Like they actually choose to

make the, they say I have a

450

:

choice that I want to make.

451

:

I want to, I want to take on

that level of responsibility.

452

:

Okay.

453

:

So if you.

454

:

The method that I think that comes to mind

is Charlotte Mason, which is a very, very

455

:

hands-on you're involved in everything.

456

:

You prepare the curriculum.

457

:

You gathered the books.

458

:

You do everything.

459

:

And in those cases for.

460

:

I mean, that's basically

what I did in the beginning.

461

:

And it is very overwhelming because

while you're teaching the kids, you are

462

:

thinking about what to cook for dinner.

463

:

And while you're eating dinner, you

thinking about what lesson plan to

464

:

prepare for the next day kind of thing.

465

:

So it is, it can be very overwhelming

and those cases, I will just say on the

466

:

weekend, Um, just make sure that your

partner or your friends or your family

467

:

can give you a couple of ours off just to.

468

:

Have yourself a day.

469

:

Just to recharge any way that you want.

470

:

If that means you go to the gym.

471

:

If he goes in the sauna, if you.

472

:

They'll take a walk outside though.

473

:

In those cases, I think you just need

to have very deliberate agreements

474

:

and it doesn't even have to be

some large chunk of time either.

475

:

It can just be a short,

like, okay, for the next 45

476

:

minutes, I'm taking a walk and.

477

:

I'm by myself and it's okay for the

kids to watch blue, not blues clues.

478

:

So you can't watch that now.

479

:

It's a weird, it's like woke now.

480

:

Um, to watch something educational

while you with dad or grandma,

481

:

and then you go off for a walk

and I think that's okay too.

482

:

Yeah.

483

:

All right.

484

:

So those are five general buckets.

485

:

You can.

486

:

Make up your own and mix mix any way.

487

:

Let's let's I think the next

question that would be on my mind.

488

:

So I'm imagining this, this person.

489

:

I didn't talk to her, but.

490

:

She's she wants to, if she asked

you, how do I not lose myself?

491

:

I think this might be overwhelming.

492

:

You said here's here's here are these

different examples of buckets of options.

493

:

We just went through.

494

:

And the next question

would be well in my area.

495

:

How do I start?

496

:

Like we're so let's maybe let's cover.

497

:

Two or three recommendations on.

498

:

If you're, if you're that person.

499

:

And you now know, okay, I've got these

options, but how do I figure out what

500

:

program is actually available near me?

501

:

The best place to go for a homeschooler

is going to be the Facebook.

502

:

So go into Facebook type in

homeschool and type in your city name.

503

:

If you are not in a big city, then you

might have to use Google and, and do a

504

:

dig a little deeper, but honestly, any

homeschooling group that that's active.

505

:

Close to your area, even if

it's not right in your area.

506

:

There will be people there

who can direct you, different

507

:

places, different resources.

508

:

If you go in there and ask.

509

:

Just say, can, will you please

direct me to a homeschool?

510

:

Co-op understand that that is going to

be that sort of the elective classes

511

:

that you can go and network with.

512

:

Networking connect with other

homeschooling families as units.

513

:

If you ask about a

drop-off kind of program.

514

:

I'm not sure there's a specific term

for, I've heard it all different ways,

515

:

but you might just, it might just

be some kind of homeschool academy

516

:

or homeschool Christian academy or.

517

:

Then you're going to have to ask.

518

:

Specifically in your area, but there

they will be drop-off situations.

519

:

And I personally call it part-time

private school, but homeschoolers might

520

:

be offended if you set that, but just

say like some kind of drop off program.

521

:

And they should be able to direct you.

522

:

To what's available in your area.

523

:

Right?

524

:

But the way.

525

:

I'll in my mind.

526

:

What I hear is you're saying.

527

:

Go talk to them in person though.

528

:

Right?

529

:

Go out.

530

:

You know, you find them on

Facebook, but go talk to them.

531

:

Right and find out what they are

before you just, you're not gonna

532

:

just like sign up for something.

533

:

No, you always do a tour first.

534

:

Always, no matter what you do, you can,

the co-ops will give you yours for.

535

:

The, um, something like

classical conversation, which is.

536

:

Combination co-op N private school.

537

:

Um, part-time private school.

538

:

Like they would, there's always gonna be

somebody who's willing to give you a tour.

539

:

And you can observe first before making

a decision, but if your kids are very

540

:

young star with just a playgroup,

That's the best place to go and

541

:

make connections and ask questions.

542

:

Okay.

543

:

So then you have.

544

:

You mentioned Facebook.

545

:

So you're finding them online.

546

:

Go and talk to them.

547

:

You also have.

548

:

You mentioned churches.

549

:

So.

550

:

There are a lot of churches where.

551

:

They're there.

552

:

There's a big homeschooling

community within.

553

:

Whatever.

554

:

Denomination that is.

555

:

It's very popular in churches.

556

:

Yeah.

557

:

So that's the second one.

558

:

I guess you'd go to meetups.

559

:

You can go to a Bitcoin meetup and

it's probably less likely you're going

560

:

to find someone who's already doing.

561

:

Um, And you're the only

other, other options.

562

:

The other thing I thought of that I did

not know about when our kids were young.

563

:

Was there are actually conventions.

564

:

Oh, yeah.

565

:

Yes.

566

:

Yes, absolutely homeschool conventions.

567

:

There are many, many, many of them.

568

:

It starts, they start in the late spring

and go all the way into early fall.

569

:

And they differ by.

570

:

Um, the approaches.

571

:

So maybe we'll do an episode on just the

different approaches of homeschooling.

572

:

So they can take different.

573

:

Can't understand the difference

because you have the Charlotte Mason,

574

:

people who do their conventions,

you have the Costco conversation.

575

:

People will do the conventions.

576

:

You have, um, Christian

homeschool conventions.

577

:

And I know that there are

secular homeschool conventions.

578

:

A lot of conventions, a lot of

them that a lot of conventions.

579

:

Yeah.

580

:

And also, I just want to say.

581

:

Homeschoolers are very

much like Bitcoiners.

582

:

They're very, very friendly

and they are, everybody's more

583

:

than happy to share experience.

584

:

And, um, they're very open.

585

:

They're open people.

586

:

So.

587

:

Gotcha.

588

:

Okay.

589

:

So.

590

:

Again, this is all inspired by

a question that was, and this

591

:

question's come up in different ways.

592

:

The same type of questions come up

to you multiple times is how do you.

593

:

Not be overwhelmed.

594

:

How do you keep yourself?

595

:

I think one of the,

596

:

one of the more extreme version

of that question or statement is,

597

:

oh, I can't possibly homeschool.

598

:

I'm going to kill my children.

599

:

And.

600

:

Okay.

601

:

Yeah.

602

:

That you don't want to get

to, you don't get that far.

603

:

Um, alone, but I mean, kids are,

that's part of, to me, the joy of

604

:

parenting is you're, you're going to

learn a lot about yourself because

605

:

you're, you're going to be in this.

606

:

You're going to be.

607

:

Uh, pushed in ways you didn't

know you could be, be pushed,

608

:

but I, I think that's a good.

609

:

A good thing.

610

:

And again, from my point of view,

We're just saying, listen, where

611

:

we homeschooled for 20 years.

612

:

We understand the Bitcoin point of view.

613

:

Here are some of the stories and

ideas to help and resources to help.

614

:

And other people.

615

:

So I think we've.

616

:

Hopefully we've covered that.

617

:

And then I guess the, I would

leave it as we're pretty open.

618

:

If, if somebody.

619

:

Doesn't feel comfortable or still is

it still has something that they're

620

:

questioning on that reach out to us?

621

:

If we didn't answer that question?

622

:

Well, enough.

623

:

Reach out to Tali or myself

on Twitter or our email or the

624

:

website, whatever, whatever way

you're comfortable reaching out.

625

:

And we're happy to help try to.

626

:

Try to get you through the process

of thinking through or how to reach

627

:

out and see what the options are.

628

:

So that's, that's all I had on

the list for days or anything at

629

:

any other final thoughts that you

had Tali for before we wrap up?

630

:

I just want to say that it is,

is, seems really overwhelming, but

631

:

it is very doable because it is.

632

:

Like I mentioned earlier.

633

:

It's not something where

it's such a giant project.

634

:

You have to plan many years ahead.

635

:

You can plan a few months at a time.

636

:

And you can continue to

adjust because you don't know.

637

:

What your true capacity is

for these kinds of challenges.

638

:

Uh, in homeschooling until

you're in the thick of it.

639

:

And then maybe you realize that

you can actually tolerate a lot

640

:

more than you realized, or you

can tell me less, but either way.

641

:

Once you find out where your limit is,

you start to look for solutions like

642

:

working with your family and friends for

time off or looking for these part-time

643

:

private school situation where you.

644

:

Get a few days off because

that's why you need.

645

:

And, you know, don't feel guilty.

646

:

It's completely fine.

647

:

Homeschooling is going to be.

648

:

A pause.

649

:

Kind of, yeah, it's constant

adjustment and kind of things.

650

:

So don't feel bad either

way, stay flexible and know

651

:

that it's going to be okay.

652

:

One step in front of the other.

653

:

Yeah.

654

:

That's really good advice.

655

:

You're going to be okay.

656

:

Your kids are going to be okay.

657

:

And we didn't, at least I didn't

have the confidence to start.

658

:

We just needed to get moving.

659

:

And then later on, after you've

looked back, you'd be like, oh

660

:

yeah, I'm capable of doing that.

661

:

I can do that.

662

:

I need you.

663

:

You realize you actually, you

already have what you need to do

664

:

this, but you don't start with that.

665

:

You, you feel overwhelmed maybe.

666

:

But, um, But yeah, you, you,

you're going to be fine.

667

:

I think that's great advice.

668

:

All right, everybody.

669

:

Well, we'll we, uh, we're doing

this to try to help folks.

670

:

If people have questions you want us to,

to address, let us know what they are.

671

:

And we'll catch you next week.

672

:

Bye have a good week.

Links