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Interview with Hala Taha: The "Podcast Princess" and Host of Young and Profiting Podcast
Episode 5212th September 2022 • Mesmerizing Marketing™ • Dimple Dang
00:00:00 00:52:29

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welcome to the mesmerizing marketing podcast, where we take a deep dive

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into the latest marketing trends, tools, and tips, and provide you with

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the top resources you need to thrive and make your marketing mesmerizing.

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And now here's your host.

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Dimple.

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Dang.

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hello everyone today.

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I am so excited to have Hala Taha, who is the princess of podcasting on

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the mesmerizing marketing podcast.

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And we are so excited to welcome this princess.

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Although I almost wanna call her a queen, cuz she is definitely a seasoned

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PODER and she's got one of the.

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Podcast out there.

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And let me tell you a little bit more about Hala.

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She is one of the biggest influencers on LinkedIn and her podcast, which is

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called young and profiting is the number one trending podcast in the education

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category on charitable also abbreviated as yap for young and profiting.

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She has gotten over 3 million download.

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On all platforms.

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And she has interviewed celebrity guests, such as Matthew McConaughy,

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Deepak Chopra, Seth Godin, mark Manson, Ryan, sir, hunt, and more.

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So you definitely wanna make sure that you subscribe to her podcast as

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well before you finish listening to this episode and you might as well.

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Subscribe to the me izing marketing podcast as well.

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And if you've been thinking of launching your own podcast, make sure you check

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the show notes for my next launch, your podcast masterclass, so that

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you can also have a show like we do.

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All right.

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So Hala, it's such an honor and pleasure to have you on the show.

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Welcome.

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I'm super excited to interview you.

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This is so amazing.

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Welcome.

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I'm very excited as well.

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Please tell the audience.

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I'm sure most people know who you are, but we always get the new listeners who

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might be like, who is this amazing woman?

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So give us a brief intro.

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Sure.

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So my name is Haah.

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I am the CEO of yap media and the host of young and profiting.

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And I've been nicknamed the podcast princess.

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And you know, I'm gonna ask you for the audience.

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How did you get that nickname?

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The podcast princess.

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Oh, I got that nickname from podcast magazine.

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I got on the cover and they coined me the Palestinian podcast princess.

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And then people started just calling me the podcast princess and I liked the name.

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And so I started referencing myself that way too.

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Absolutely.

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And it is a title well earned and well deserved.

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So I absolutely love that.

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And let's go back in the day.

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Let's talk about when you first thought about the idea

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of launching your own podcast.

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How did that all come about?

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I wanna hear the story behind it.

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What was your inspiration behind it?

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Sure.

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So I started young and profiting podcast in April of 2018.

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And at the time I was working corporate at Hewlett Packard, but I

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actually started my career in radio.

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I started my career at hot 97, the world's number one, hip hop and R V station.

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And that's where I first grew my love.

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Of podcasting.

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And, and that was back when I was 19 years old, I worked there for free for

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three years and I always had that love.

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I had lots of online radio shows throughout the year.

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So I would host with my friends and other up and coming DJs I'd

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have different online radio shows and interview music artists I've

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interviewed like soldier, boy, fabulous.

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This was.

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Pre young and profiting.

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And I used to even have a YouTube show at one point pre young and profiting.

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And so I was always into that kind of thing.

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And even when I was in corporate and I thought I would never get back on

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a mic, I was the girl that was like interviewing the CEO for the town hall

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and like still doing the same type stuff, just in a different way, translating

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my skills into a different way.

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And then.

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I didn't get an opportunity that I really wanted a Hewlett Packard.

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It was this volunteer organization that I was working in for two years and

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they didn't give me the opportunity.

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And that triggered me to want to start something new that I owned,

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where there was no gatekeeper that I could control and grow as I wish.

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And that's why I started young and profiting podcast.

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I love that you created your own path when there was none.

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Because sometimes people get discouraged and they just wanna give

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up instead of like finding a way.

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Right.

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And I feel like I wanna go back to even like, way, way back in the day

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when you were five years old, if you can remember when you were five,

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I have a feeling that you were.

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Very entrepreneurial and very inspired to do your own thing even back then.

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So can you talk to us a little bit about the childhood and what

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you were doing while you were growing up besides going to school?

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Of course.

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So I was always the type of person who loved to put on a show.

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So there's a big joke in my family that I sang before.

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Spoke and I was always singing.

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I actually wanted to be a singer when I was older and I was always a hustler.

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I always wanted to work.

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I came from a family of doctors, everybody in my family is doctors, my

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siblings, all my cousins, my uncles, my dad, like everybody was a doctor.

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And you were kind of expected to just study, study, study and work

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after you graduated med school.

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And like your job was to.

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Become a doctor or maybe a lawyer or an engineer, but like the whole idea

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was to do well in school and not worry about any extracurricular activities

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and just study and go to med school.

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And for me, I was never like that.

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I demanded to work.

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Since I was 13 years old, I would even before that set up shop at the park.

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And like when everybody was in summer camp at the park, tried to sell

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stuff to like the other kids, whether that was bracelets or slushies.

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And I would put everybody to work and I was always this

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like little entrepreneurial.

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Spirit that would recruit other people to help me create a business.

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Like that was always my thing since I was a little girl.

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And so, yeah, I mean the beauty of life is that you just layer on skills

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and experiences and, and you use your skills in unique ways as you

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get older and get more experienced.

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And I kind of have just leveraged that kind of mentality.

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My whole.

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I love that.

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I love that.

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That's amazing.

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And at the time were you thinking like, Hey, I wanna go to college

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and what did you wanna become?

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Right.

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Because you knew that you're like, well, I don't know if I'm willing to go

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the doctor route or the lawyer route, but what was your dream like job?

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So to appease my parents, I decided I was gonna go to N G I T.

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And that was a school in New Jersey and I would study how to make makeup.

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And so my first degree was.

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Being organic chemistry.

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It was.

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And I want, I wanted to make makeup and be an influencer that way, but my real

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passion and what I wanted to do, like as my dream was to become a famous singer.

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And so when I was in school around 19 years old, I fell in

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love with the law of attraction.

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And when I really got into.

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And started to believe in myself and really believed that life was

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limitless and let go of the beliefs that like my parents and my family

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kind of trained me to have in terms of like expectations of life.

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Then I was like, oh, I'm gonna be a famous singer and be famous.

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And, and then I got the internship at hot 97 and like all these crazy

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things almost got shown MTV, all the, all these things happened, like

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in my early twenties, because I had shifted my mindset at one point.

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But to answer your question, I originally went to school to be.

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A chemist and to make makeup, cuz it, I thought it was the funnest thing

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that my parents would allow me to do.

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that is interesting.

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I love that.

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Yeah.

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Makeup is fun.

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I mean we, girls love our makeup of course.

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Right?

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Yeah.

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And here you are today and I mean, you are definitely thriving, but of course

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people only see where you are today and along the way, there's a lot of adversity.

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There's a lot of struggles that come up.

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And if you think back to your journey of becoming a podcaster of

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starting your own media company, what adversity did you face?

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Like is there something that stands out and how did you overcome that?

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Yeah, 100%.

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I mean, I feel like I've faced so many adversities in my life and so many

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rejections and failures, everybody, to your point, they see the highlight reel.

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They see 10, 12 years later after all the hard work, the blood, sweat, and tears.

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So in terms of the adversity, I.

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Number one is nine 11, right?

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I'm Arab American.

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I'm Palestinian American.

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Even since I was a little girl just being Palestinian, my, my

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nationality is controversial and I remember being a little girl growing

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up in a white and Jewish school and going over to my friend's house.

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And I thought that I was just a normal kid and they'd be like, where are you from?

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And I'd say, Palestine.

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Palestine doesn't exist.

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Like, what are you even talking about?

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Like adults would say this to me as like a seven, eight year old girl.

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And so just all those little things add up.

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I remember being, and I'm only thinking about this because I wrote a post

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about this the other day on LinkedIn.

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I remember being at maybe like first day of school, you know,

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first grade or second grade.

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And I'm announcing my name to the kids that I'm about to spend the next 10

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years with 12 years of some of my life.

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What's your name?

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Oh, my name is hella, right?

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That's how you actually say my name in Arabic.

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And I remember the gym teacher was like, hell as in hell, like hella as in hell.

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and then like, one of the girls who was friends with me was

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like, no, hella as in helicopter.

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And then like, she was like, and it's just so funny because like you remember those

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things and it's those things that, that you remember in terms of like, just the

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little adversities, just even my name.

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I remember it was so hard for me to get a job after college

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because of my name and wow.

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Actually, if I got the interview where if my picture was on it.

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I would get the call back, but if there was no picture of me and

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they just saw my name, they would assume, I didn't know English, or I

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looked weird or I didn't look like them, or they couldn't relate to me.

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And so all my resumes have a picture on them.

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Otherwise I would be discriminated against just because my name is strange.

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And by the way, why do I go by Haah now?

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Because I was made fun of, of when I was a kid, just because of my name.

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So adversities, I think mostly have to do with my ethnicity, honestly.

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And like the setbacks that I.

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Based on prejudices that other people had about Arabic people.

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I think the main point of my adversity, other than just like rejection from people

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along the way, gatekeepers telling me no, you know, not getting opportunities

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that I deserved being a minority woman in general, I think was my biggest adversity.

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Yeah, because racism, it was really prevalent.

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They're like, no, you can't have this opportunity because we looked

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at your name, scratch next re.

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Resume or next, whatever, but then you put your photo there.

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They're like, oh, she's beautiful.

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She's attractive.

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And if you were like, say, if it was a sales job, they're

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like, oh, she'll do well.

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And again, that's like this constant judgment that we get from, from the world.

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Right.

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And even in corporate America, They're judging all the time and, they're

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playing favorites and they're giving promotions to people who maybe just

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kissed up to the boss and it wasn't really because they deserved it.

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Mm-hmm . And, and I know, like, I know you've experienced that as, as

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well, and it happens all the time.

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And, going back to when you were working in corporate at all these big brand name

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companies like Disney and Hewlett and other companies, what was your opinion

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of the whole corporate America thing?

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Did you ever say to yourself, you know, I don't like the way they run things.

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I don't like that.

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Literally they act like they own you.

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I don't want any part of this anymore.

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Like what was going through your mind?

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Yeah, I mean, my first leg of corporate and I entered corporate pretty late

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because before corporate, I was working at a radio station and then I had a.

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Blog site and was hosting parties and concerts.

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And so like I started my career very late, but when I did start my corporate

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career, I started at Hewlett Packard and I actually loved their company culture.

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And I really thrived.

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And I remember being in my corporate career, starting late and thinking

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that I was gonna be so behind everybody who had started their career earlier.

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But because I had learned everything on the internet,

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I was really digitally savvy.

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I was so much more technically advanced, especially in things like

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social media, which was like so hot when I first started corporate that

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like, I just skyrocketed in my career and I got promoted left and right.

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But the thing is Hewlett Packard was the CEO at the time was a woman.

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So it was a very like open culture.

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Like women were really respected and treated like leaders and everything

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was kind of like fair game gender wise.

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Okay.

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And also like, HP was just like open minded in terms of like

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cultural differences and, and people were really trained on like how

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to deal with like discrimination and all those kind of things.

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So I just feel like the company culture was actually conducive to have

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like a minority woman thrive in it.

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And I did, I, I really thrived at Hewlett Packard.

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I ended up leaving because I didn't get some opportunity that.

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HR director didn't give me because of a personal issue with me.

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Not necessarily like, just like wider, circumstances happening when

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I went to Disney, that's when I actually decided to start a side

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hustle that was other than my podcast.

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Yeah.

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Media, my agency that actually like enabled me to quit my job and like

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start making enough money to actually build an empire that I built with.

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Yeah.

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Media.

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Disney triggered me to do that.

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And that's because when I went to Disney, it was a total boys

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club and it was so obvious.

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I was there for two years.

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Imagine I was at Hewlett Packard and getting promoted every six months.

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I was like leading people twice my age, like I was given so

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much respect and responsibility.

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I go to Disney and like, they're literally treating me like an intern.

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That's how I felt, even though I was such a high, well paid job, but I felt

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like I was treating like an intern.

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I was seeing like men that were younger than me, like

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getting promoted over me and.

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All these boys, like hanging out with VPs and stuff like that.

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And me not getting invited to the bar and like all those kind of things.

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And like just getting passed up for opportunity.

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Didn't get promoted in two years and then COVID hit.

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And I started yeah.

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Media and it like took off immediately.

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And I was like, well, I'm out of this shit hole.

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Like , I'm not gonna waste my time.

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I know my worth.

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And so I just left.

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So had I stated huah Packard, I might.

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Stayed until I became CEO.

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Like that was what I felt at Hewlett Packard at Disney.

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I was like, this is not for me.

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I'm not being valued.

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I don't see any sort of pathway to anything extremely extraordinary.

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And I want to be extraordinary in my life, so I can't stay here.

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And I figured I was really getting some momentum with the

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podcast and I leveraged that.

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Yeah.

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I really love that because some people, they just get comfortable

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and they get complacent and they're just like, you know, I have a job.

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It pays a paycheck every two weeks and they just stay whether they're happy or

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not, whether they're fulfilled or not.

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And, and I love that you unapologetically said, listen, I'm not gonna stay.

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I am better than this.

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I'm gonna be able to accomplish way more on my own.

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And I'm outta here, like byebye, see you later, you know, and, I

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think that takes courage.

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It really, really does.

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And I think a lot of people stay in opportunities.

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They stay in relationships because they don't have the courage to

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leave, or they don't have that belief and confidence in themselves.

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That's so important when you're like, Going out to venture to

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do something on your own, right?

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Because for you, I'm sure that was the first time you're starting a company of

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your own, if that had to be an exciting experience, but it also had to be a little

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bit of a scary experience and, and nerve wracking and listening to some of your

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other interviews, Heather Mohan, she was the one that put the idea in your

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head and said she saw something in you.

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And she gave you that little push, just that little push that you needed.

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Right.

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And now.

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You've got such a successful media company and I'm gonna let you

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tell me a little bit about that.

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And I wanna dig a little deeper after that.

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Yeah.

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100%.

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So Heather Monahan did encourage me to start my business.

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So when I started younger profiting podcast, just to like back up,

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so I, I started this podcast.

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The podcast in, in itself is a business now, right?

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Yeah.

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And I get sponsorships and it's its own company in itself.

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And when I first started the podcast, I literally thought

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that I would never make a dollar.

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I didn't even understand the podcast business model, even two and a half

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years ago, when clubhouse first started, I was touting on clubhouse.

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You can't make a business out of a podcast.

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Like that's a pipe dream.

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You know, now I realize like, no, it's not, you can definitely make

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a business out of just podcasting if you know what you're doing.

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Right.

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And if you understand the business behind podcasting, but regardless,

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I had pure intentions when I first started and I always thought that

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it was just gonna be a hobby now.

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One thing that I did want, and that I did put out there and knew

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that would eventually happen.

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I knew that it would eventually be a company, but I thought I was gonna

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have a podcast network, which I do now, but I didn't realize there was gonna

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be this step of an agency in between, which eventually I think my agency is

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just gonna almost power my network.

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Right.

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And so.

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This marketing agency was birthed from the fact that I had

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grown my influence on LinkedIn.

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And I was really standing out with innovative videos and audiograms, and

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was one of the first podcasters that was utilizing video, especially on LinkedIn.

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I be quickly became one of the biggest podcasters on LinkedIn and

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Heather Monahan came on my show.

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And when Heather came on my show, we hit it off.

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It wasn't anything that special, but what happened was, is she was a huge influencer

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on LinkedIn, maybe three times my size.

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And she would constantly comment on my videos and she'd be like,

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ha, I need you to do my videos.

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Ha when, when am I, when are you gonna teach me how to do this?

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Ha how are you making those, these videos?

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I wanna chat.

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So I was like, Okay, Heather, we can talk at the time my dad

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was in the hospital COVID it was a really hard time in my life.

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I was actually at my parents' house.

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I'd left my boyfriend's house in Brooklyn and was basically

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quarantined at my parents' house.

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I got COVID myself.

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My dad was in the hospital and.

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Nobody wanted to hang out with me for like three months, because it was just when

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COVID happened, this was may of 20, 20.

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Wow.

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And everybody was very afraid of COVID.

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It was actually April of, of 2020.

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And everybody was really afraid of COVID.

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And so nobody was hanging out with me.

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And so I had all this time stuck at my parents' house and Heather was like,

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trained me to do it is I'm like, sure.

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I have nothing better to do.

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I'll train you how to do videos.

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We had a call and I was showing her around.

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I showed her my slack channel.

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At the time I had volunteers and interns who were just

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working on the show for free.

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I have a little knack of recruiting teams like we discussed earlier.

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And so I literally had maybe 15 to 20 people in a slack channel

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that were volunteers and interns helping me with the show.

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Maybe it was less, maybe it was like 15 at the time.

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And then.

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Heather looked at all my stuff.

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My slack channels files my headliner, my Canva templates.

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And I taught her what I was doing and showed her around.

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And she was like, Hola.

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Like, this is better than Vayner media.

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I just had a call with Vayner media.

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And this is more impressive.

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If not, just as good as what Vayner media is doing.

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Like, I want you to start.

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Making my content.

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I want you to manage my LinkedIn.

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And I was like, whoa, whoa.

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I don't think I could do that.

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I have a full time job.

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I have a career, but I can start with your videos.

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And so she started paying us like 700 bucks a month, like 500 to

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700 bucks a month, nothing big.

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And then it ended up.

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Taking over all of her LinkedIn then taking over all of her podcasts, her

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Instagram, and then we just landed client after client, after client.

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And it was actually my podcast that became my lead generation tool.

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And so whether people invited me on their podcast and then it became my.

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Client like Jason Waller, who happens to be a billionaire.

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Right.

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See, that was the only one that that ever happened.

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And then it's usually the guests that come on my show and like Kara

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golden, the CEO of Hintwater Brian Scudamore the CEO of 1-800-GOT-JUNK.

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Kim par, Alex Carter, the, the world's number one negotiator for females.

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Marshall Goldsmiths is my client.

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He's a huge author.

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I manage all of his social channels.

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So basically we.

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Kept landing, bestselling, author CEO, high ticket, social

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media and podcast services.

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And it just grew overnight, six months into it.

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I had 30 employees around the world.

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I have a creative team in Philippines, an ops team in India, my social

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team and production teams in the us.

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And six months into it.

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I was still at Disney.

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Still not promoted, even though I really worked just as hard as at

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Disney while I was working at the company, I just had no commute.

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And a lot of extra time, I, I had 30 employees by the time I decided to quit.

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Wow.

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And full time us employees, by the time I decided to quit, I was that safe with

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everything I really waited until there was really no risk, even though being an

Speaker:

entrepreneur in itself is, is very risky.

Speaker:

I've learned yeah, absolutely.

Speaker:

Oh my gosh.

Speaker:

It seems like you definitely have the building a team.

Speaker:

Down to the core.

Speaker:

And I wanna dive into that a little bit.

Speaker:

So for, our listeners who are maybe in the process of trying to build out

Speaker:

their own teams right now, first of all,

Speaker:

. You know, in terms of getting interns,

Speaker:

Do they go look at a college website?

Speaker:

Who do they ask for like talk to us about the intern part of it first?

Speaker:

Yeah, sure.

Speaker:

So when it came to my intern program, I really just put out a solicit online.

Speaker:

And typically what I do is.

Speaker:

I give them a stipend, a monthly stipend for working as an intern.

Speaker:

When I first started, we weren't making any money and it was just

Speaker:

all volunteers to be transparent.

Speaker:

Nobody was making any money.

Speaker:

So it wasn't weird.

Speaker:

And if anything, it was way easier to keep that team motivated and excited

Speaker:

and everything like that, because we were just all working towards

Speaker:

giving back towards a common mission.

Speaker:

And it was me teaching everyone how to have really valuable skills and

Speaker:

me working very, very, very hard.

Speaker:

And.

Speaker:

The dynamic was just like, let's learn from Hala and

Speaker:

support this mission for wider.

Speaker:

Good.

Speaker:

And then once we were actually getting money, it was a whole different story.

Speaker:

Then it's like, everybody's on payroll, everyone's getting a stipend.

Speaker:

It's more official, right.

Speaker:

Because it's actually a company now.

Speaker:

So in terms of getting interned, we would put out solicits on LinkedIn.

Speaker:

That's where I grew my following.

Speaker:

And so I would just hop on video and be like, what's up everybody.

Speaker:

We have.

Speaker:

Quarterly internship program.

Speaker:

I'm gonna teach you how to do X, Y, and Z.

Speaker:

And the way that it works is that if you do a good job after three or

Speaker:

four months, you basically have full time job ready for you, especially

Speaker:

if you're like a senior in college or something, because we're a service

Speaker:

based business, a social media agency.

Speaker:

As soon as I get a new client, I usually have to hire more people.

Speaker:

So I love having interns that get trained and, you know, we

Speaker:

teach them valuable skills.

Speaker:

They can either.

Speaker:

Get a job with me or they'll be trained up to go get a job somewhere else.

Speaker:

So it's a beautiful program and internships are amazing.

Speaker:

Now what's surprising is that a lot of people don't care about college credit.

Speaker:

I offer it, but a lot of them don't even want it.

Speaker:

And a lot of the people that I interned are actually people who graduated

Speaker:

school and they couldn't get a job.

Speaker:

I was able to give them the skills that they needed to get

Speaker:

a job, whether it was me with me or someone else that is amazing.

Speaker:

I mean, that's a win-win for both parties and especially for them

Speaker:

because they have options, right.

Speaker:

They can come work for you if they want.

Speaker:

And if, if they don't, they can take those skills and they can get

Speaker:

a position somewhere else, but it's really valuable use of their time.

Speaker:

So I think that's amazing that, you know, Did that.

Speaker:

And then in terms of even hiring like teams from all over the world, right.

Speaker:

You've got some in India, some in the Philippines, how did

Speaker:

you, build out these teams?

Speaker:

Like how did you find them and could have been again, could be

Speaker:

in LinkedIn cuz you really, you know, had a big presence there.

Speaker:

I'm just curious if it was LinkedIn, if it was something else.

Speaker:

Yeah, 100%.

Speaker:

So I did start, I guess, with LinkedIn.

Speaker:

And everything that I did was building small one step at a time.

Speaker:

So my creative team in the Philippines, which is now like 25, plus people

Speaker:

all started with one video editor.

Speaker:

And I remember I had this service.

Speaker:

This is actually a really funny story.

Speaker:

I was using this service called video Husky and.

Speaker:

I didn't have anybody that was hired at this point.

Speaker:

I just had my volunteers, but like, nobody really knew how

Speaker:

to video edit, except for me.

Speaker:

And that's like a really hard skill to train.

Speaker:

I would try and like, nobody would do it good enough.

Speaker:

And so I eventually needed to outsource that.

Speaker:

And so I looked to this company called video Husky, which apparently had.

Speaker:

Unlimited video editing.

Speaker:

This is before I had an agency, it was just my podcast.

Speaker:

And so I wanted to do like two, three videos a week and apparently

Speaker:

unlimited video editing is just one video a week or so it was something

Speaker:

ridiculous and it was $700 a month.

Speaker:

And, and they ended up firing me as a client, cuz they said that

Speaker:

I was too demanding and they.

Speaker:

Said to me, you should go get your own team.

Speaker:

You need your own team.

Speaker:

And so I was like, all right.

Speaker:

So I literally went on LinkedIn and I went and I poached their video editors.

Speaker:

You can actually go on LinkedIn and you can see people who work for a company.

Speaker:

So I went to video Husky and I found the girl who I was working

Speaker:

with and she got laid off.

Speaker:

The girl that was doing my videos was amazing.

Speaker:

Got laid off.

Speaker:

And I reached out to her and I was like, Hey, I was wondering

Speaker:

if you're looking for a job.

Speaker:

And she's like, actually I just got laid off from video Husky.

Speaker:

And I was like, wow, how much were they paying you?

Speaker:

And she was like $550 a month.

Speaker:

And I was like, cool, I'll pay you 700.

Speaker:

And so instead of doing one video a week, I started doing like four

Speaker:

or five videos a day with her.

Speaker:

And then she ended up training the next, like, as we were growing,

Speaker:

she would train the next person and they were doing videos and graphics.

Speaker:

And then eventually I got just graphic designers.

Speaker:

Then my team in the Philippines started helping me recruit

Speaker:

other people in the Philippines.

Speaker:

And then I met my creative director, Trish on clubhouse who's from

Speaker:

the Philippines and she's like a, more of a higher up executive.

Speaker:

And she runs my entire creative team.

Speaker:

And took it off my hands after I built it up to like 10 people, then Trish took

Speaker:

it and now it's even bigger and better.

Speaker:

And like so many different roles at that team.

Speaker:

And it's just crazy.

Speaker:

It all started with one video editor who I was like, Hey, like they're screwing you.

Speaker:

I'll give you a job and let's do this.

Dimple:

I love that.

Dimple:

You're just such a badass.

Dimple:

I mean, I absolutely love that because it just like, it

Dimple:

just makes me so happy to see.

Dimple:

You're like, you know what?

Dimple:

Okay, well you told me to start my own thing.

Dimple:

I will.

Dimple:

And I'm actually gonna take your people with me.

Dimple:

And then I started, I got so many of their employees who on their own guard come and

Dimple:

work for us and I'm like, sure, you could.

Dimple:

I know you're well trained.

Dimple:

Let's do this.

Dimple:

I'm sure they hated you.

Dimple:

they hated you.

Dimple:

They're like who is this woman?

Dimple:

Okay.

Dimple:

She's beautiful.

Dimple:

And she's smart, but wow.

Dimple:

She's also dangerous.

Dimple:

You have to watch out for this one because you come in and, and if you say

Dimple:

something to her, she will literally.

Dimple:

Take it and run with it where, you know, if they said that to somebody

Dimple:

else, they'd be like, okay, whatever.

Dimple:

Right.

Dimple:

But it, it seems like every time someone's told you no in

Dimple:

life, you're like, hell yeah.

Dimple:

You know, like, hell yeah, like I'm gonna do this.

Dimple:

And it just seems like that almost like drives you internally.

Dimple:

Like, am I right?

Dimple:

Like, is there this internal thing in you where somebody tells you no.

Dimple:

You're like, hell yeah.

Dimple:

It's not really somebody telling me no, it's more that I don't sit on

Dimple:

rejection and like wallow in rejection and decide that somebody else's opinion

Dimple:

of where I ought to be or belong.

Dimple:

Isn't the truth.

Dimple:

Right.

Dimple:

And so I just know that like my power is in me and you're not gonna stop me.

Dimple:

No one person telling me no is gonna stop me.

Dimple:

So it's not necessarily like you told me no.

Dimple:

So I'm gonna do it.

Dimple:

It's more like, I know I'm gonna do it no matter who tells me no in the

Dimple:

process, you know, Yeah, exactly.

Dimple:

Love that.

Dimple:

with that, with like success too, like when you're on the way up and

Dimple:

you know, you're just growing and growing and growing, I think a lot

Dimple:

of stuff happens along the way.

Dimple:

And sometimes like people who you think are your friends

Dimple:

are not really your friends.

Dimple:

And then you get maybe haters that are out there, like.

Dimple:

How did you handle all of that?

Dimple:

Because, I mean, it happens to everyone, so I can imagine it it's probably

Dimple:

happened to you as well, but how did you deal with the haters, the naysayers

Dimple:

or the friends that are like, because they're jealous now, all of a sudden.

Dimple:

They're criticizing what you're doing, cuz they don't understand it.

Dimple:

They don't understand podcasting cuz they've never had a podcast.

Dimple:

They don't understand running a media agency cuz they don't have a media agency.

Dimple:

Maybe they still work in corporate.

Dimple:

And even if I've had people like that, it's like, oh I was making Instagram

Dimple:

reels and they were working in corporate and they never knew anything about it.

Dimple:

They didn't understand it.

Dimple:

So instead of like understanding, they were like criticizing.

Dimple:

Right.

Dimple:

I remember.

Dimple:

One day, it was like a Tuesday morning, 9:00 AM.

Dimple:

And I get this message on Instagram.

Dimple:

And it's this girl that I know, that's a friend of a friend, so

Dimple:

I've known her for many years.

Dimple:

I'd call her like an acquaintance.

Dimple:

And she messages me the nastiest message on Instagram and

Dimple:

says, dimple, you look crazy.

Dimple:

And I'm like, oh, I look crazy because I'm making an Instagram real like, okay.

Dimple:

And you know, it's funny cuz she was on a plane.

Dimple:

At 9:00 AM getting drunk, sending these messages.

Dimple:

But it was like, so upsetting, like I just blocked her and everything because

Dimple:

it's like, I was like ready to have a great day and it just threw my day off.

Dimple:

You know what I mean?

Dimple:

Yeah.

Dimple:

But people, but people like that, I think the thing is

Dimple:

like, I realize later, Secretly.

Dimple:

She was jealous of me and she didn't like me.

Dimple:

Right.

Dimple:

But she was pretending like she was okay.

Dimple:

And I just, I figured that out later,

Dimple:

so, have you experienced friends who have changed, you know,

Dimple:

based on when you started to get bigger and grow with success?

Dimple:

Yeah.

Dimple:

I mean, I would say that.

Dimple:

It's definitely hard to change and transform and expect that your circle of

Dimple:

friends and people that you're surrounding with isn't gonna change either.

Dimple:

And so, as I've evolved into like this new phase of my life, I feel

Dimple:

like I've shed a lot of friends.

Dimple:

And honestly, it's been really hard.

Dimple:

Like I hate talking about it because it's been hard.

Dimple:

Like it's been, I lost my boyfriend of 12 years.

Dimple:

I have a new boyfriend and he's amazing, but it's like, that was still my family.

Dimple:

You know what I mean?

Dimple:

And it's like a person is no longer in my life and I don't think he's

Dimple:

ever gonna be in my life again.

Dimple:

And it's also like my best friends from high school.

Dimple:

Like it's like, people just can't see you the way that you are now.

Dimple:

They see you as what you were, especially if you went to high school with someone.

Dimple:

They, can't acknowledge who you are now or, believe it or wanted or relate to it.

Dimple:

And I don't think it's necessarily jealousy because I feel like

Dimple:

everybody has good intentions.

Dimple:

And I feel like I genuinely believe that my friends have good intentions,

Dimple:

but I feel like it's just unrelatable.

Dimple:

Annoying.

Dimple:

And I feel bad for people like my sister, like my sister's so supportive,

Dimple:

but I went to her birthday party.

Dimple:

The first thing that her friends say is like, oh my gosh, like you're so famous.

Dimple:

Right?

Dimple:

We go, I go to Jordan and my cousins are like talking about

Dimple:

like same kind of a sentiment.

Dimple:

You know what I mean?

Dimple:

I'm not even that.

Dimple:

Famous yet.

Dimple:

Like, I feel like it's gonna get so much worse for everybody in my life.

Dimple:

And it's cuz it's like, I feel like I'm barely scratching the surface.

Dimple:

Like I don't think I made it yet.

Dimple:

You know, and even my sister's like was like, I'm just surprised.

Dimple:

Like I felt very jealous when we were in Jordan.

Dimple:

I felt like everybody kept talk, talking about your podcast and your business.

Dimple:

And I'm a doctor and I felt unsuccessful and it's just like really weird.

Dimple:

It made me realize that like, well, no wonder, like a lot of people that

Dimple:

was friends with me don't wanna be my friend, but it's really easy to make new

Dimple:

friends, but it's also hard to determine who's really my friend and who's not.

Hala:

So it's hard to navigate like really transforming.

Hala:

And I feel like had I chose something that was not necessarily like

Hala:

putting myself out there so much when it comes to social media or just

Hala:

being like more of a personality.

Hala:

I don't think I would've gotten the same pushback.

Hala:

I don't think it's about entrepreneur or corporate, cuz I feel like.

Hala:

Friends and my family, they want me to be successful.

Hala:

I think it's the clout that comes with the type of stuff that I'm doing,

Hala:

that people are uncomfortable with.

Hala:

Yeah.

Hala:

Yeah.

Hala:

And, and I think sometimes it's just, they haven't experienced it

Hala:

themselves and they don't understand it.

Hala:

And I think that part of it even, you know, makes them uncomfortable, but

Hala:

they're probably gonna be a whole lot uncomfortable because I know you've

Hala:

got a lot more, you're gonna be accomplishing and a lot more goals on.

Hala:

And things because you're not done yet.

Hala:

I mean, you are like ready to take on the world and, you know, speaking of

Hala:

that, what are some things that you're really excited about that have happened

Hala:

in 2022 that you wanted to share?

Hala:

Well, I started my podcast network, so to me that is.

Hala:

One of my number one priorities.

Hala:

It's so exciting.

Hala:

So basically I figured out how to monetize my podcast network and really

Hala:

Y really blew up two years ago in terms of the, the size of our show

Hala:

and the ability to get sponsorships.

Hala:

And I independently learned how to get sponsorships and I've worked with

Hala:

all the different sales channels.

Hala:

And then I grew a couple other shows to my size.

Hala:

I learned how to do podcast media buying and, and really being able to control

Hala:

the size and the growth of my clients' podcasts and monetize their shows.

Hala:

And then that triggered me because there was one point in the year

Hala:

when things were really hot.

Hala:

And I was like, I'm out of inventory.

Hala:

I have no more spots to sell.

Hala:

And all these brands are knocking at our door.

Hala:

I should start a network.

Hala:

And so I started recruiting other shows and now I have.

Hala:

Seven or eight exclusive shows.

Hala:

I've decided to keep it small, grow them big.

Hala:

And we're about to sign a very cool deal that I'm really excited about.

Hala:

We're getting signed exclusive.

Hala:

I'm gonna be no longer independent, which I'm very excited about.

Hala:

You know, it's been hard doing it all by myself and I feel like I

Hala:

got it so far and I'm like, okay.

Hala:

Yes.

Hala:

Some help.

Hala:

So I'm very excited.

Hala:

that?

Hala:

Congratulations on that.

Hala:

That is super exciting.

Hala:

And yeah, I mean, it's like, you can do it alone, but for how long

Hala:

eventually, you can experience burnout.

Hala:

And I think sometimes it's just fun to have somebody there by your side

Hala:

too, who's there to support you.

Hala:

And then you feel like, okay, well, You know, I'm not in this all alone.

Hala:

And, and I have someone to support me.

Hala:

I have someone that believes in what we're building together and, and that's amazing.

Hala:

So I'm super excited for you.

Hala:

Does your podcast network have like its own name or anything like that?

Hala:

Yeah.

Hala:

So it's called the yep.

Hala:

Media network.

Hala:

Okay.

Hala:

Everything is yep.

Hala:

Media.

Hala:

So it's yep.

Hala:

Podcast.

Hala:

Yep.

Hala:

Media.

Hala:

Yeah, media network.

Hala:

And I love our name by the way, because Y I just feel like it's such a cool name

Hala:

to have to own in podcast industries.

Hala:

Everything is under that yap umbrella.

Hala:

And then in terms of the partnership, I mean, it's gonna be an exclusive

Hala:

sales partner, so they're gonna be focused on the sales and I'll be

Hala:

focused on the content, the growth, the social, which is our sweet spot.

Hala:

So I'm just part of the partnership that I'm excited about is

Hala:

really the ability to focus.

Hala:

On what we're really good at.

Hala:

And the best thing to have in a partner is somebody who can kind

Hala:

of deliver on your weaknesses.

Hala:

And so you can focus on your strength.

Hala:

So very excited about it.

Hala:

Yeah, absolutely.

Hala:

It's nice to have that complimentary, you know, person who's gonna come in and they

Hala:

can do things that maybe you don't like doing or their talents or a little bit and

Hala:

skills, a little bit different than yours.

Hala:

So I love that.

Hala:

And then in terms.

Hala:

the podcast is, is like huge.

Hala:

it's something I really wanna dive into a little bit deeper.

Hala:

And when it comes to sponsorships, I think a lot of people always think, you

Hala:

know, oh, I'm gonna launch a show and automatically in a month or two, like

Hala:

sponsors are gonna be coming to me.

Hala:

And I think that's not realistic.

Hala:

That's not really how it happens.

Hala:

And I feel like even what you're sharing, it seems like you have

Hala:

actually gone after sponsors yourself.

Hala:

You know, instead of waiting for them to come to you.

Hala:

And so I wanna talk about if someone's launching a show, what are some

Hala:

realistic goals and expectations to have?

Hala:

Because I always say to them, you wanna launch a podcast, do it, to

Hala:

build your brand and do it as an avenue to share your expertise and

Hala:

your skills with the world, right?

Hala:

Because it's a voice and it's like your brand and your brand, you

Hala:

should always be building your brand.

Hala:

Right.

Hala:

But don't do it where you're gonna.

Hala:

oh, month one.

Hala:

I'm gonna be able to monetize it month one.

Hala:

I'm gonna get a ton of clients because I mean, it could happen, but I personally,

Hala:

I don't think that's realistic, you know?

Hala:

So what are your thoughts on all that?

Hala:

Oh yeah, it's definitely not realistic.

Hala:

I mean, podcasting.

Hala:

A lot of people say is a long game.

Hala:

It requires consistency.

Hala:

And honestly it requires strategy.

Hala:

I feel like most podcasters are really only worried about their content

Hala:

and they're not worried about the promotion and they're not learning

Hala:

about the different promotional tactics.

Hala:

I mean, I would say.

Hala:

Most of my free time.

Hala:

And I'm just being honest.

Hala:

I'm a podcast nerd.

Hala:

Most of my free time is just researching how I can grow my podcast, not the

Hala:

content, not the guests, not like all that kind of that stuff is easy.

Hala:

In my opinion, I feel like that's like a really controllable thing.

Hala:

The growth of your podcast is like being strategic, creative, experimenting,

Hala:

like really learning things that people aren't given away for free.

Hala:

And.

Hala:

And reinvesting, right?

Hala:

So it's, it's a whole business model and you're not actually gonna make

Hala:

money off sponsorships unless you're actually invested in the growth

Hala:

of your podcast and monetarily and with your time and all of that.

Hala:

And also like the other thing is you can hire an expert.

Hala:

There's not many of them in the podcast space, but I do podcast.

Hala:

Media buying Jordan harbinger is one of my partners in this

Hala:

space for that kind of a thing.

Hala:

And there are podcasters that do it for themselves and will do it for other

Hala:

people, you know, but it does take investment and time and you can do it on

Hala:

your own, but it takes experimentation.

Hala:

So for example, like now I'm all about like, Experimenting with

Hala:

paid ads and how to grow my podcast following with social paid ads.

Hala:

Right.

Hala:

And really figuring that out or how to, you know, drive people from

Hala:

LinkedIn to my podcast and getting more innovative with that since my following

Hala:

is getting bigger, my reach is getting bigger, figuring out how to translate.

Hala:

Those social following into subscribers.

Hala:

And just to reiterate, you know, promotion matters and, and being

Hala:

strategic with your marketing matters, and you should spend a lot of time on it.

Hala:

If you're serious about being a podcaster, otherwise you're doing

Hala:

all this work upon deaf ears.

Hala:

And I feel like that's just a waste of time if you're not willing to actually

Hala:

put it out there and like one by one, even get listeners in any means that you can,

Hala:

you know, even in the DMS and reaching out personally, Once you have 200 people

Hala:

who listen to an episode like that's cool.

Hala:

You know what I mean?

Hala:

You have 200 people who are listening to what you have to say, and

Hala:

you can keep building onto that.

Hala:

Right?

Hala:

So it's not that you have to have this massive podcast, but I feel

Hala:

like people just don't do the work required even just to get a small

Hala:

following so that it's worthwhile.

Hala:

Yeah, absolutely.

Hala:

No, I always say like, yeah, you use it to build your brand, but you have to promote

Hala:

it and you have to have a marketing strategy to market and promote your

Hala:

episodes because I always like say it.

Hala:

Okay, well you have your show, but then what are you gonna,

Hala:

where are you gonna play?

Hala:

But, but here's the thing it's taking it to that next step.

Hala:

So it's like people, they do the bare minimum.

Hala:

They're like, I'm gonna put up a video on Instagram story on

Hala:

Instagram, a post on Instagram, and then everyone's gonna find my show.

Hala:

You know what I mean?

Hala:

And it's like, no, like there's so much more to it.

Hala:

Yeah.

Hala:

It's very hard to pull people from social to your podcast.

Hala:

There's so many other tactics that you could be taking there's ways to track

Hala:

it and iterate and get better and, and lower the cost of your subscriber.

Hala:

Like that's the kind of stuff you need to be really into.

Hala:

If you wanna actually take podcasting seriously.

Hala:

You know, and if you're not doing that kind of thing, you're just like

Hala:

a new, like, you know what I mean?

Hala:

Like you're not a real podcaster.

Hala:

Like it, like, you need to like really know your stuff.

Dimple:

Yeah.

Dimple:

You're saying there's like a whole even science behind it.

Dimple:

And it's like studying, you know, trends studying what's working,

Dimple:

what's not working and finding new.

Dimple:

And innovative ways to like really promote your show and take it to the

Dimple:

next level and be creative where it's like, not just, okay, everyone can put

Dimple:

it on Instagram or make a reel out of it, things like that, but it's really

Dimple:

taking it on a whole other level.

Dimple:

So based on 100%.

Dimple:

Yeah.

Dimple:

So based on that, I love it.

Dimple:

If you could share like maybe just one little tip on how you would do that

Dimple:

or how you would tell someone to do.

Dimple:

Yeah, 100%.

Dimple:

I'm happy to do that.

Dimple:

The real key is that you wanna be where the podcast listeners are.

Dimple:

And so if you always keep that mentality, right.

Dimple:

I like that's priority.

Dimple:

Number one, be where the podcaster is.

Dimple:

And that means on the different apps, there's like 70 apps

Dimple:

that make up the market.

Dimple:

Right.

Dimple:

So what does that mean interviewing on other podcast?

Dimple:

So what I'm doing right now, I'm interviewing on your podcast.

Dimple:

If you guys like what I'm saying, you can subscribe to young and profiting podcast.

Dimple:

Right?

Dimple:

If I was a real animal and like ruthless, I'd be like,

Dimple:

Hey, can we pixel this episode?

Dimple:

So I can see how many people converted to my podcast from yours.

Dimple:

And you can actually track that in apps like chartable and in a similar

Dimple:

manner, I could say, Hey dimple, could you read a commercial for.

Dimple:

About young and profiting podcasts.

Dimple:

And can we pixel track that?

Dimple:

And I would be able to see how many people listened, estimated how many

Dimple:

people downloaded the episode to their phone and how many people actually

Dimple:

went and downloaded my episode from listening to you, who in the

Dimple:

household, did anybody in the household download that episode from you?

Dimple:

I can track that in chartable.

Dimple:

And then theoretically, if it works well, I could get a

Dimple:

commercial on dimples podcast every week or every single episode.

Dimple:

And if it didn't work well, I could be like, well, let me go test another show.

Dimple:

So that's a lot of podcasters are doing coast red ads on other podcasts in a

Dimple:

similar manner you can do in feed drops.

Dimple:

So that means I'd be like dimple, you know, for a thousand dollars.

Dimple:

Would you, would you just read a five minute or you.

Dimple:

One to three minute commercial and drop it as like an episode.

Dimple:

And it would be like, you know, Haas and profiting podcast review or

Dimple:

whatever the heck I'd say a lot of those infe drops are for new podcasts.

Dimple:

And so it'll be like new podcast announcing and then all of your

Dimple:

users would get a push notification.

Dimple:

That's why that's so powerful on all the different apps that they use.

Dimple:

So that's one way, the other way to be visible in the apps

Dimple:

is to do an app media buying.

Dimple:

So a.

Dimple:

Players, they offer banner ADSS, featured podcasts areas.

Dimple:

And so if you go on any podcast app and you see featured podcast app

Dimple:

section, that should trigger you, oh, this is a paid ad opportunity.

Dimple:

Let me try to find somebody who works there and, and see how much this costs and

Dimple:

see what the potential results could be.

Dimple:

And let me do a test.

Dimple:

So like I'm constantly being like what new apps are available?

Dimple:

Do they have active users?

Dimple:

Is there a spot for me to advertise?

Dimple:

and then, I do that for my clients.

Dimple:

I'll make relationships and then find out what's available.

Dimple:

And then, every quarter they send me spots and I get them resold, so I'll do

Dimple:

that all the time because I've built the relationships, but anyone can do this.

Hala:

You could just, be investigative and find the right people and

Hala:

figure out how it's done and you obviously need to be able to invest.

Hala:

So there's free, there's paid ways to grow.

Hala:

And then there's all social, you know, social is a great way.

Hala:

Definitely second priority because half of the people who are on social don't even

Hala:

listen a podcast, but it's still a great way to convert real active listeners.

Hala:

And by the way, also to get reviews and things like that,

Hala:

which is like social proof.

Hala:

And so I'm constantly in the DMS.

Hala:

One of the tactics that we do is I'll put up a video, any sort

Hala:

of asset that we put on social.

Hala:

Whoever engages with that asset, if it's related to an episode is gonna get a DM

Hala:

about that episode with a direct link.

Hala:

Right.

Hala:

And if they come back and say they enjoyed the episode, they're

Hala:

gonna be asked to write a review.

Hala:

Right.

Hala:

It's just coming up with these loops and conversations that you have with people to

Hala:

continually drive them to your priority.

Hala:

Yeah.

Hala:

I absolutely love that.

Hala:

And it it's a very.

Hala:

Thought out strategy, and that's a thing, a lot of people, they start

Hala:

a business, but they don't even take the time to write a business plan or

Hala:

put together a marketing strategy.

Hala:

And then they wonder why they fail.

Hala:

Right.

Hala:

Because, you know, you can't just say, oh, I'm gonna spend this much

Hala:

money on this and this and this.

Hala:

That's not a marketing strategy.

Hala:

Anyone can spend money if they have money, but it's more so really doing

Hala:

your research and determining what is the goal for your business or for your.

Hala:

Where do you wanna be?

Hala:

Where do you wanna take it?

Hala:

What do you wanna rank for, in terms of even SEO?

Hala:

Like when I talk about podcasting, I always talk about, you know, one

Hala:

of the things about podcast is, they rank high organically, but you

Hala:

have to know how to take advantage of search engine optimization.

Hala:

Right.

Hala:

And a lot of people, I see their shows and I'm like, why did they title it this way?

Hala:

You know, I'm just like, oh, because if they titled it differently,

Hala:

They could be getting hundreds of views and they don't do that.

Hala:

Right.

Hala:

My first year launching podcast was yeah, like a year ago, like last year and I

Hala:

launched like four shows cuz I was, I had wanted to have a podcast for so many years

Hala:

and then I just, things would get in the way and everything would get in the way.

Hala:

And finally I launched my first show.

Hala:

Then I launched some like fun shows too, like Emily in Paris

Hala:

where we, talk about the show and stuff, but it was all a strategy.

Hala:

Okay.

Hala:

I know I can get this to rank and just getting free traffic, but I

Hala:

think people need to really sit down and write down a real plan.

Hala:

For even like their podcast, they need to be strategic about the name that

Hala:

they pick, like everything, from yeah.

Hala:

A to Z.

Hala:

And you've done a really great job of building up organically

Hala:

and, you know, the caliber of guests that you have on your show.

Hala:

I mean, they are like the crem D and crem, right.

Hala:

You've got celebrities, you know, you've got Seth Godin,

Hala:

you've got all these people.

Hala:

So I wanna talk about that a little bit, because that is just exciting.

Hala:

Remarkable.

Hala:

First of all, It seems like you already had experience in this even before you

Hala:

had a podcast from what we talked about before, but do you remember, like in your

Hala:

mind, cuz you have plenty of celebrities on there, but in your mind, who was your

Hala:

first celebrity that you got on your show?

Hala:

How did it happen and how did it make you feel?

Hala:

Well, I would say that from the start I had big guests on my show.

Hala:

So my first ever guest was Dr.

Hala:

Jack Schaeffer and he was the author of the like switch and Dory Clark.

Hala:

So like off the bat, I had like huge authors on my show and most

Hala:

of my guests are authors or CEOs.

Hala:

Some of them were celebrities.

Hala:

But like there's celebrities, quote unquote, or like people know

Hala:

their name a lot, and they have lots of fans and things like that.

Hala:

But you know, I'm not interviewing, JLo and Chris brown and all the, Kim

Hala:

Kardashian, you might . I might, I had Matthew McConaughey on the show.

Hala:

I had big guests, Dave Asprey, ed Mylet.

Hala:

I've had big guests in my space.

Hala:

So anybody who's in a self improvement space.

Hala:

And if they're a big name, they're on my show, whim H.

Hala:

You name it.

Hala:

So I've had, I'm not trying to downplay my guests.

Hala:

Like I've had incredible, incredible guests, but from the

Hala:

start, it's all been the same.

Hala:

And I always was really, really careful with who I invited on my show, because

Hala:

I knew that the names that I got were leverage and every time I got one person,

Hala:

it led me to somebody who was even bigger.

Hala:

And I knew that if I like.

Hala:

Didn't have the right caliber guests.

Hala:

It could actually ruin the credibility of my podcast and when people are coming

Hala:

on and making the decision to come on my show and evaluating my show, they're

Hala:

looking at who else went on my show and that's either gonna excite them or

Hala:

make them not excited about the show.

Hala:

And so I knew that from the very start and I was very, very careful

Hala:

and basically the way that I did it before I had any listeners is.

Hala:

Gave my backstory to all of these guests.

Hala:

And so I remember I landed David Allen, episode number five.

Hala:

Okay.

Hala:

He wrote getting shit done.

Hala:

He's one of the biggest authors in the world.

Hala:

That was one of my biggest first interviews that like, I felt like, wow,

Hala:

like David Allen, you know, he thought it was huge that we got David Allen.

Hala:

And I just remember messaging him and first of all, I was doing

Hala:

something a little bit different.

Hala:

It was.

Hala:

Relatively new.

Hala:

Now, everyone has a podcast when I was doing it four and a half

Hala:

years ago, it was still like, wow, this young girl has a podcast.

Hala:

Like good for her.

Hala:

Like I wanna support her.

Hala:

And by the way, like, especially a girl, like I just feel like I just

Hala:

stood out and I had a very innovative way of reaching out to people.

Hala:

I'd reach out and LinkedIn connect.

Hala:

Messages.

Hala:

And I would invite them to connect and be like, Hey, what's up?

Hala:

My name is ha I have a podcast.

Hala:

It's a top 10 hot two podcast.

Hala:

And, or top 100 or whatever ranking I was at the time.

Hala:

And I'd love to connect.

Hala:

They saw that I was like active on LinkedIn.

Hala:

I didn't have a huge following, but I was like trying to get active.

Hala:

This was all in the very beginning.

Hala:

I probably had 5,000 followers still, but all these people still said yes

Hala:

to me, cuz I was just like energetic and, and showed potential and just

Hala:

like was doing something new and had great looking graphics and assets.

Hala:

And so they probably were like, If I wanna give a shot on somebody up

Hala:

and coming, like, she looks like I should give her a shot, you know?

Hala:

And so I feel like people just took a chance on me because I had

Hala:

all the right things, even though I didn't have the downloads.

Hala:

And so, yeah, I had David Allen, episode five, I had Chris Voss episode number 23.

Hala:

Right.

Hala:

I was landing people like Neal and Dan pink, like episode 30, Steven Cotler

Hala:

was like episodes 30 David Meltzer was.

Hala:

Episode, like in the twenties and thirties.

Hala:

So I was by like my 20 30th episode, I was getting like big guests and then

Hala:

it just kind of snowballed from there.

Hala:

Like I had Matthew McConaughey.

Hala:

That's probably still my biggest guest.

Hala:

That was a year ago.

Hala:

I've had great guests since then and better interviews since then.

Hala:

And to me, it's not just about like how big the guest is, but of

Hala:

course I want a number one expert.

Hala:

I want people that respect that somebody that has a name, but they

Hala:

don't necessarily have to be like the biggest celebrity in the world.

Hala:

It just has to be really valuable content for my listen.

Hala:

Well, I listened to, your podcast all the time and the content is absolutely

Hala:

amazing because the thought leaders and the guests that you bring on, they

Hala:

are of extreme high caliber, and they all have very interesting insights

Hala:

on life and mindset and business and business hacks and marketing.

Hala:

And everything.

Hala:

And even like, you know, Chris VO, I, I know him.

Hala:

I used to be on this breakfast club committee at this private club in LA

Hala:

and he was one of the guest speakers.

Hala:

And this was when he came in and he was talking about hostage negotiation and

Hala:

he was talking about writing the book.

Hala:

So it's so cool now, like to see like, wow, this book is out there

Hala:

and he's, you know, oh, wow.

Hala:

Made it a mega success.

Hala:

Cuz I knew him when he was like talking about doing it.

Hala:

So it's like so cool to see that.

Hala:

I love that.

Hala:

So I know we're about to wrap up, but I wanted to know if there's a

Hala:

favorite motto or saying or slogan that you love to live your life by.

Hala:

Oh, I love this.

Hala:

I love the slogan.

Hala:

How you do anything is how you do everything.

Hala:

I feel like I always love to give my hundred and 20%.

Hala:

I had ed my lead on the show and he's this big podcaster motivational speaker.

Hala:

Your listeners probably know who he is.

Hala:

And he always talks about this concept of one more.

Hala:

He just put out a book called one more.

Hala:

And I always like to take that mentality.

Hala:

If I'm working out, I'll do one more set.

Hala:

You know what I mean?

Hala:

Even if I feel so tired, if I'm doing work, I'll do you know, 10 more email?

Hala:

And I always just try to like push myself a little bit further.

Hala:

And I do that with everything that I do.

Hala:

Like if I have a presentation, it looks beautiful and I rock it.

Hala:

I prepare if I have an interview I study and I'm never just going in blind.

Hala:

And I really feel like how you do anything is how you do everything.

Hala:

And so, no matter what it is, it's doing my hair.

Hala:

If it's doing my makeup, I wanna learn how to do it.

Hala:

Amazing and, and do my best.

Hala:

And so I just always try to do my best.

Hala:

And I feel like when you try to do everything your best and live that

Hala:

way, you know, good things will come.

Hala:

Yeah, that is a great philosophy to have.

Hala:

I love that.

Hala:

Thank you so much.

Hala:

And is there anything you wanted to share before we wrap up?

Hala:

Is there anything exciting you wanted to announce?

Hala:

I mean, I'll obviously put all your information in the show notes and,

Hala:

you know, connect your podcast and all that, but is there anything

Hala:

exciting that you're working on, you know, besides the network that you

Hala:

wanted to share with the audience?

Hala:

Nothing really, to share other than the fact that I have some

Hala:

amazing interviews coming out.

Hala:

So I'm interviewing guy Kawasaki tomorrow, which is really fun.

Hala:

I recently had whim H on the show, like I said, I had ed Mylet on the show.

Hala:

I had Deepak Chopra on the show, so many great recent episodes.

Hala:

Oh yeah.

Hala:

We didn't mention celebrity Deepak show for like Jesus Christ.

Hala:

That was the pinch me moment, but I've had some awesome.

Hala:

Awesome guests.

Hala:

So you guys can check that out young and profiting it's on all

Hala:

the major apps and I'd love for you guys to listen to the show.

Hala:

Absolutely.

Hala:

They have to like download all the episodes and binge on them because

Hala:

I mean, they are full of value.

Hala:

So thank you so much for being on mesmerizing marketing and

Hala:

we will see you next time.

Hala:

Thanks dimple.

Hala:

And if you've been thinking of launching your own podcast, make sure you check

Hala:

the show notes for my next launch, your podcast masterclass, so that

Hala:

you can also have a show like we do.

Hala:

Thank you for listening to the mesmerizing marketing podcast.

Hala:

If you found this episode valuable, please subscribe to the show.

Hala:

So you don't ever miss an episode and also share it with your friends.

Hala:

Dimple would be so grateful.

Hala:

If you could take a minute to leave a review and visit the podcast website,

Hala:

to check out all the latest episodes.

Hala:

At www.mesmerizingmarketingpodcast.com that's www.mesmerizingmarketingpodcast.com

Hala:

and follow PLE on clubhouse.

Hala:

Her handle is marketing expert and also join her mesmerizing marketing

Hala:

club also on clubhouse for live rooms on top marketing strategies for

Hala:

entrepreneurs and business owners who want to mesmerize their marketing.