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Strategic Giving and Lasting Legacies: Barron Damon's Philanthropic Insights
29th April 2024 • Seek Go Create - The Leadership Journey for Christian Entrepreneurs, Faith-Based Leaders, Spiritual Growth, Purpose-Driven Success, Innovative Leadership, Kingdom Business, Entrepreneurial Mindset, Christian Business Practices, Leadership Development, Impactful Living • Tim Winders - Coach for Leaders in Business & Ministry
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Have you ever wondered what it takes to give back in a way that aligns with your deepest values? In today's episode of Seek Go Create, we sit down with philanthropic coach Barron Damon to unravel the true meaning of generosity beyond the dollar signs. Barron shares his transformative journey from a preacher's kid to a seasoned nonprofit executive, and how a life-altering attack reshaped his perspective on faith and giving. Join us as we delve into strategies for impactful philanthropy, the power of legacy through heartfelt stories, and the profound revelation of writing "Monday Morning Manna." If you're ready to redefine success and discover how to leave an enduring mark on the world, this conversation with Barron Damon is one you can't afford to miss.

"Philanthropy is not just about having deep pockets; it's about having a deep passion for people and making a difference in their lives." - Barron Damon

Access all show and episode resources HERE

About Our Guest:

Barron Damon is a seasoned philanthropic coach and nonprofit executive with over two decades of experience helping individuals and organizations craft strategic philanthropic initiatives. With a profound personal journey that includes a transformative encounter with faith, Barron champions the definition of philanthropy as the love of mankind, guiding others to align their giving with their deepest values. He is the author of "Monday Morning Manna," a part devotional, part journal that serves as both a testament to his spiritual insights and a legacy to his family. His expertise lies in not only defining one's philanthropic goals but also in implementing effective strategies for impactful giving. Through his commitment to service and community, Barron Damon continues to inspire a tangible difference in communities, encouraging others to live their legacy in the present.

Reasons to Listen:

1. **Transformative Moments:** Discover how a violent attack served as a pivotal moment for Barron Damon, reshaping his life path towards faith, philanthropy, and purposeful living — an inspiring tale of triumph over adversity.

2. **Philanthropy Demystified:** Gain unique insights into the practicalities of altruism as Barron Damon, with over 20 years of experience, breaks down the complexities of charitable giving and guides you on how to align your contributions with your deepest values.

3. **Legacy Beyond Wealth:** Explore the profound impact of building a spiritual and emotional legacy as Barron Damon shares his journey from writing a personal devotional to creating a multigenerational legacy item, prompting listeners to reflect on what they will leave behind for future generations.

Episode Resources & Action Steps:

### Resources Mentioned:

1. Barron Damon's Book: "Monday Morning Manna."

- This resource is valuable for individuals seeking spiritual guidance and insight into philanthropy and personal growth. It serves as a devotional and as a potential legacy item for families.

2. Get a Free Session to Discover Your Philanthropic Why with Barron

### Action Steps:

1. Identify Passions and Begin Your Philanthropic Journey:

- Reflect on your personal values and identify causes that resonate with you. Start researching nonprofits and initiatives that align with your passions to ensure your philanthropic efforts are meaningful and impactful.

2. Consider Legacy and Impact:

- Think about the legacy you wish to leave for your family and community. Take practical steps to incorporate your life's mission and vision into your daily activities, ensuring that you are not only living for the moment but also creating a lasting impact.

3. Create Your Legacy Item:

- Inspired by the example of Barron Damon's book, consider writing down your thoughts, life lessons, or spiritual insights. This tangible legacy item can serve as a gift to your family and a way to share your values with future generations.

Resources for Leaders from Tim Winders & SGC:

🔹 Unlock Your Potential Today!

  • 🎙 Coaching with Tim: Elevate your leadership and align your work with your faith. Learn More
  • 📚 "Coach: A Story of Success Redefined": A transformative read that will challenge your views on success. Grab Your Copy
  • 📝 Faith Driven Leader Quiz: Discover how well you're aligning faith and work with our quick quiz. Take the Quiz

Key Lessons:

1. Genuine Faith Over Labels: Barron Damon highlights the significance of cultivating a real and personal relationship with God instead of merely identifying with the Christian label. This relationship should be nurtured within families to ensure it is heartfelt and passed down to future generations.

2. Philanthropy as an Expression of Love: Philanthropy is redefined by Barron as not just a matter of wealth, but as the expression of love for humankind. He encourages listeners to align their giving with their deepest values, to create a philanthropic strategy that reflects their passion for making a difference in the world.

3. Overcoming Adversity Through Faith: Sharing a personal life-changing event, Barron talks about being assaulted and the subsequent hardships he faced. His turning point came with embracing his faith, which led him to a life of purpose through philanthropy and serving others, demonstrating the power of resilience and spiritual growth in the face of trials.

4. The Importance of Being Present and Building a Legacy: The discussion with Tim Winders reveals the concept of being "addicted to tomorrow" and the critical nature of living in the moment. Barron and Tim explore how creating an impact now is integral to living one's legacy, rather than focusing solely on life’s eventualities.

5. Ensuring Your Giving Has Impact: Barron Damon outlines practical steps for listeners to embark on their philanthropic journey. He advises identifying personal passions and values, researching nonprofits, and using giving vehicles such as donor-advised funds and charitable trusts to ensure that one’s philanthropic efforts are effective and aligned with heartfelt convictions.

Episode Highlights:

00:00 Curiosity about sharing personal and professional life.

09:04 Communicating lessons from Go, titled Monday morning manna.

11:01 Family creating a legacy of love together.

19:59 Passing on heritage, values, and wisdom through generations.

24:06 Legacy encompasses family, faith, and financial aspects.

30:57 Uninspired church experience, found spiritual connection elsewhere.

33:58 Assaulted at college, running from God.

40:36 Success, leadership, and self-discovery in life's journey.

45:50 Reframe legacy to live your impactful life.

50:16 Discover and empower to create a mission.

58:15 Uncertainty in giving to nonprofits, suggestions offered.

01:00:27 Promote giving and sharing the gospel globally.

Thank you for listening to Seek Go Create!

Our podcast is dedicated to empowering Christian leaders, entrepreneurs, and individuals looking to redefine success in their personal and professional lives. Through in-depth interviews, personal anecdotes, and expert advice, we offer valuable insights and actionable strategies for achieving your goals and living a life of purpose and fulfillment.

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Mentioned in this episode:

Achieve Your Vision with Tim Winders' Executive Coaching

Dreaming of a leadership role that not only achieves goals but also truly inspires? Join Tim Winders, your SeekGoCreate host, on a journey to make those dreams a tangible reality. As an expert executive coach, Tim is dedicated to transforming your aspirations into lasting legacies. With a unique blend of faith-driven guidance and real-world experience, he helps align your professional goals with your deepest values for a fulfilling and successful journey. Ready to shape a path that's truly your own? Schedule a free Discovery Coaching Call with Tim now. Dive into a conversation that could turn your vision into reality. Let's embark on this transformative journey together.

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Transcripts

Barron Damon:

philanthropy is really the love of mankind in the simplest form.

Barron Damon:

when you think about the world we live in, that word love, is something

Barron Damon:

that you just don't hear very often.

Barron Damon:

But philanthropy at the root, philo meaning love, is the love of mankind.

Tim Winders:

What does it mean to truly live your legacy through strategic giving?

Tim Winders:

Today on Seek Go Create, we welcome Baron Damon, a seasoned philanthropic coach and

Tim Winders:

nonprofit executive with over 20 years of experience as the managing partner of the

Tim Winders:

Business of Life Coaching and Consulting.

Tim Winders:

Baron has dedicated his career to teaching individuals and organizations how to align

Tim Winders:

their giving with their deepest values.

Tim Winders:

From creating an award winning giving circle to founding the BK Damon

Tim Winders:

Foundation alongside his wife, Dr.

Tim Winders:

Katrina Damon, Barron's work exemplifies a commitment to making

Tim Winders:

a tangible difference in communities while fostering lasting legacies.

Tim Winders:

Barron, welcome to SeatGoCreate.

Barron Damon:

Thank you, Tim, for having me.

Barron Damon:

I'm so excited about being here and have an opportunity to talk to you.

Barron Damon:

I'm just excited about the conversation.

Tim Winders:

I am too.

Tim Winders:

It's going to be a great conversation.

Tim Winders:

You and I, I think we're going to connect very well on a lot of the

Tim Winders:

topics and some that you may not even be aware of yet, just from me doing

Tim Winders:

some research and studying on you, Barron, but, but let's start this way.

Tim Winders:

If, if you're out and about, I don't know, Church business, or just in

Tim Winders:

the community and someone bumps into you and they ask you what you do.

Tim Winders:

What do you typically tell people when they ask what you do?

Barron Damon:

I tell them I help, people create a strategy for

Barron Damon:

their philanthropic giving that aligns with their deepest values.

Barron Damon:

In other words, I help people give money away.

Tim Winders:

And when you say that, when you say that, what

Tim Winders:

kind of response do you get?

Tim Winders:

I guess a lot of people probably say, I don't have any to give.

Tim Winders:

What are you talking about?

Barron Damon:

People are stunned actually.

Barron Damon:

And they say, I've never heard of that before.

Barron Damon:

You know, tell me more.

Barron Damon:

so at least they're intrigued enough to want to ask additional

Barron Damon:

questions because it's not something that you hear about every day.

Tim Winders:

So one thing I'm curious about just right at the beginning here,

Tim Winders:

you mentioned that you bring that up if someone asks you what you do and, and, and

Tim Winders:

I'm sure that you, you probably have the EQ to know whether you should go into that

Tim Winders:

in certain environments and when not to.

Tim Winders:

I mean, sometimes you probably say I'm a, I'm a husband, I'm a

Tim Winders:

dad and other things like that.

Tim Winders:

But what kind of, you mentioned the response, and I think this is going to

Tim Winders:

lead into a lot of the conversation.

Tim Winders:

How many people.

Tim Winders:

Have ever even thought about that topic that you bring up?

Tim Winders:

I mean, I'm sure you get quizzical looks.

Tim Winders:

You probably get, huh?

Tim Winders:

And then sometimes you get, I've been meaning to talk to someone like you.

Tim Winders:

I'm guessing

Tim Winders:

that's rare that you get that.

Tim Winders:

Correct?

Barron Damon:

It is rare, but.

Barron Damon:

I find it's starting to happen more often.

Barron Damon:

and, and usually people are inquisitive.

Barron Damon:

People know about nonprofits and they know about donating money.

Barron Damon:

but they don't have a strategic plan around it because most time, and I have

Barron Damon:

a podcast and when people come on the podcast, I say to them, can you tell me?

Barron Damon:

Or declare that I am a philanthropist.

Barron Damon:

And they're like, they have this moment where they don't know or sure.

Barron Damon:

Now you can look and see what they've done.

Barron Damon:

I mean, they're, they're philanthropists, right?

Barron Damon:

But they don't have the confidence or they have a misconception

Barron Damon:

of what philanthropy is.

Barron Damon:

And then they will say, I am a philanthropist.

Barron Damon:

And it's one of the most powerful moments, on the show.

Barron Damon:

And I always get these chill bumps.

Barron Damon:

Cause I'm like, wow, they got it.

Barron Damon:

And then they feel empowered.

Barron Damon:

The shoulders is up straight.

Barron Damon:

They're like, I am a philanthropist.

Barron Damon:

This is what I do.

Barron Damon:

I help and support people and I make a difference in people's lives.

Tim Winders:

Sure.

Tim Winders:

so do this for me real quick, and then I'm going to veer a few directions.

Tim Winders:

And then we're going to come back to this, this big topic.

Tim Winders:

Define philanthropists.

Tim Winders:

For, for someone listening in, it's a mighty big word and I joked

Tim Winders:

with you before we hit record, you know, I'm from, I'm, I'm from, you know, little

Tim Winders:

town in Georgia, outside of Atlanta.

Tim Winders:

And I like to joke, I don't, I don't know a lot of big words and things like

Tim Winders:

that, but philanthropists, somebody asked you, so what is a philanthropist?

Tim Winders:

What do you tell them?

Barron Damon:

Yeah, I tell them, and I try to demystify the word for

Barron Damon:

people because I, people do kind of mispronounce it or struggle with it.

Barron Damon:

And I say, philanthropy is really the love of mankind in the simplest form.

Barron Damon:

And you know, when you think about the world we live in, that

Barron Damon:

word love, is something that you just don't hear very often.

Barron Damon:

It's a lot of bickering.

Barron Damon:

It's a lot of dissension.

Barron Damon:

But philanthropy at the root, philo meaning love, is the love of mankind.

Barron Damon:

And that's simply what it is.

Tim Winders:

And there should be actions that back up that love.

Tim Winders:

You know, you brought up that word love.

Tim Winders:

I do think the word is, Thrown around a good bit in our society and culture.

Tim Winders:

I'm just not sure it's thrown around.

Tim Winders:

Well, I mean, people love pizza.

Tim Winders:

They love their wife.

Tim Winders:

They love, you know, their, their favorite TV show.

Tim Winders:

And I think it may not, my word is may have been watered down.

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Tim Winders:

A little bit.

Tim Winders:

So speaking of love, this is something I think right before we hit record,

Tim Winders:

I shared with you, you've, you've written a book that's available.

Tim Winders:

That's called Monday morning man.

Tim Winders:

And, and I know we want to talk about legacy, but to me, this is

Tim Winders:

a great foundation for legacy.

Tim Winders:

And.

Tim Winders:

And I, I didn't read the book.

Tim Winders:

I don't think in the way you designed it, it's designed as 52 weekly

Tim Winders:

devotions and things like that.

Tim Winders:

But I want to say this and then I'm going to let you respond and just talk about it.

Tim Winders:

And I think we can build on the conversation.

Tim Winders:

As I was reading through it, and it kind of drew me in because I started

Tim Winders:

it early this morning when I was just in my quiet time, and I knew that I

Tim Winders:

was preparing for this conversation.

Tim Winders:

I started reading it and I just kind of kept going and going and going.

Tim Winders:

And here's the reason why.

Tim Winders:

To me, it was part journal, As a, as a father and a, and a follower

Tim Winders:

of Christ and things like that.

Tim Winders:

And, and it is rare that you get a glimpse inside someone's journal.

Tim Winders:

And I thought that was kind of cool, especially if you're about

Tim Winders:

to have an you know, an hour long conversation with someone.

Tim Winders:

It's really valuable.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Tim Winders:

And then, and then I also thought.

Tim Winders:

It was, it was really part of a devotion.

Tim Winders:

It had devotional aspects to it, which I like.

Tim Winders:

But what I really said as, as the father of grown children, I

Tim Winders:

have two grown children myself.

Tim Winders:

I really felt like it was just a love letter to your children.

Tim Winders:

That's really what.

Tim Winders:

It seemed like to me, and I see you nodding for those listening.

Tim Winders:

He's been nodding.

Tim Winders:

so so did, did I capture all that?

Tim Winders:

Well, is that, was that the intent or what was the story behind it?

Tim Winders:

I know I read the, you know, the beginning of it, but, you know, tell

Tim Winders:

me a little bit more about that.

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Barron Damon:

Did we talk about this already?

Barron Damon:

Tim, you know, based on what you said, we had to talk about it already, right?

Barron Damon:

this was all of those things, right?

Barron Damon:

It's a devotional.

Barron Damon:

And how it started, I would say kind of mid pandemic, My daughter

Barron Damon:

was in college at Virginia Tech and my son was, you know, really kind

Barron Damon:

of struggling during the pandemic.

Barron Damon:

And I had just finished writing a 40 day devotional and that was a

Barron Damon:

lot, you know, to, to the family.

Barron Damon:

And I, I wanted to continue to do something, but not at that pace.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

Every day.

Barron Damon:

And so I said, you know what?

Barron Damon:

On Mondays, I would start writing.

Barron Damon:

And it was really kind of an extension of that 40 day, but it was a little more

Barron Damon:

intimate into my own kind of personal life in the lives that we have as a family.

Barron Damon:

And I started sending them on Mondays, you know, and, and the, the.

Barron Damon:

My kids and my wife was like, Oh, this is great, honey.

Barron Damon:

You know, pat you on the back.

Barron Damon:

That's wonderful.

Barron Damon:

You know, and it just kind of kept on going.

Barron Damon:

I had no idea or no design to, to write these for 52 weeks or more.

Barron Damon:

It was just part of the plan.

Barron Damon:

I just wanted to be able to communicate to my family in a way that was God centered.

Barron Damon:

And also for them to learn some lessons along the way, as I was also learning

Barron Damon:

my own lessons and processing what God was dealing with me about, right?

Barron Damon:

and my family is an extension of me, me being the leader in my family.

Barron Damon:

And as I started writing, probably a few months into it, my wife says to me, she

Barron Damon:

said, Honey, you should name it Manna.

Barron Damon:

Monday morning manna because it feels like God is speaking to

Barron Damon:

you through this, this process.

Barron Damon:

And so we started calling Monday Morning Manor.

Barron Damon:

and it was good because the kids would respond in certain ways.

Barron Damon:

My son didn't hardly respond.

Barron Damon:

You know, my daughter would say fire emojis and it was great.

Barron Damon:

And I really got something from this and I was really excited about that.

Barron Damon:

And I'm like, son, how was it?

Barron Damon:

it was okay.

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Barron Damon:

You know, he said, I'm getting it dad.

Barron Damon:

I'm getting it.

Barron Damon:

and then about halfway through, I say, I'm going to stop this.

Barron Damon:

And then the Holy Spirit spoke to me and said, this is not about you.

Barron Damon:

This is not about you.

Barron Damon:

And I heard that very distinctly and I kept on writing and I didn't

Barron Damon:

know that this would be a book, probably November of last year.

Barron Damon:

it just kind of came to me.

Barron Damon:

I believe God just, Urged me and prompt me to do it.

Barron Damon:

And I reached out to a friend who was an editor and we

Barron Damon:

started having a conversation.

Barron Damon:

She said, when do you want it by?

Barron Damon:

I said, by Christmas, I want to give it to my family as a legacy gift.

Barron Damon:

And I would put their names on it as authors.

Barron Damon:

And she was like, that's very ambitious, but we were able to pull it off.

Barron Damon:

and I surprised them Tim, the day before Christmas, cause we always exchanged

Barron Damon:

gifts and I had it in this black box and it had legacy box on it and they

Barron Damon:

opened it up and they were just amazed.

Barron Damon:

I mean, and my daughter said, dad, why did you put our name on this?

Barron Damon:

And I said, because we're a family and we did it together.

Barron Damon:

even though I was the one doing the writing and through that whole

Barron Damon:

process, I mean, God taught me so many.

Barron Damon:

Lessons personally, place at times when I just needed to grow and develop

Barron Damon:

or, you know, maybe there's some fears or apprehensions that I have in

Barron Damon:

terms of moving forward in business or some of the struggles my Children

Barron Damon:

were having in individual places.

Barron Damon:

And we addressed all of it.

Barron Damon:

and it was a love letter, so to speak, right?

Barron Damon:

to them.

Barron Damon:

And you can, you can hear it.

Barron Damon:

In the language.

Barron Damon:

I love you at the end, or, feel like Paul, you know, in the Bible, beloved,

Barron Damon:

you know, something like that, but it turned it out to be a great opportunity

Barron Damon:

for me to share with people about legacy.

Barron Damon:

And then Tim, something amazing happened.

Barron Damon:

I sent the book out to just friends and family and they read it.

Barron Damon:

They started reading it and they started sending it to other people.

Barron Damon:

And.

Barron Damon:

And I was like, wow, I mean, texting me in the middle of the night or

Barron Damon:

early in the morning or getting emails saying this really helped me this.

Barron Damon:

It blessed me.

Barron Damon:

I'm like, wow, this is amazing.

Barron Damon:

And so God can take this little.

Barron Damon:

Thing right that you desire to just be a blessing to your

Barron Damon:

family and amplify it for others.

Barron Damon:

And I find that fascinating that God can take a little thing and magnify it

Barron Damon:

into something much more than we expect.

Tim Winders:

Yes.

Tim Winders:

And it had really nourishing spiritual and, you know, devotional things.

Tim Winders:

But let me tell you the big thing that I got from it, because.

Tim Winders:

As a father, my wife and I, Gloria and I have talked often about how

Tim Winders:

we thought that when our children became more grown adults, that

Tim Winders:

we would be a little bit freer.

Tim Winders:

It would be, you know, all of these things and our, our children are doing great.

Tim Winders:

You know what I mean?

Tim Winders:

It's not like, it's not like we've got.

Tim Winders:

Issues or anything like that.

Tim Winders:

However, as I was reading through and I knew it was weekly, I

Tim Winders:

knew you wrote this every week.

Tim Winders:

I experienced through you the ups and downs of your children, because I

Tim Winders:

know you were experiencing the emotion of doing well this week.

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Tim Winders:

Gone through a challenge and I, and I think where I'm at, I'm,

Tim Winders:

I'm probably around Thanksgiving.

Tim Winders:

I mean, you know, we've been through your son's gone through some moves

Tim Winders:

and changes and I could tell, I know that he's attempting to find his

Tim Winders:

place in the world during this year.

Tim Winders:

Your daughter, you know, she moved and she's working.

Tim Winders:

I mean, And, and the reason I think that's, I think it goes into this

Tim Winders:

legacy conversation, because as fathers, I think there's sometimes this

Tim Winders:

perception of being disconnected and you know, we're out doing our own thing.

Tim Winders:

I lived your children's life through you in reading that.

Tim Winders:

And I could tell that your mood.

Tim Winders:

Now, my wife and I've tried to determine if this is a good thing or a bad

Tim Winders:

thing, but it went up and down based on what your children were experiencing.

Tim Winders:

Is that correct?

Barron Damon:

Yeah, because it was, it was to them and also my wife because we, we

Barron Damon:

went through some, some challenges, you know, quite a few during that time, but

Barron Damon:

it was, it was all of them and, and me included that needed to be, encouraged.

Barron Damon:

You know, and support it.

Barron Damon:

And even though we were, you know, at one point you mentioned my son, Joshua,

Barron Damon:

he was in San Diego, and now in Hawaii, you know, and my daughter was in DC

Barron Damon:

and, and we were just, and we were so close as a family, we were used to being

Barron Damon:

together and it was the distance itself.

Barron Damon:

That was a challenge for us and not being able to communicate and talk.

Barron Damon:

But yeah, it was all of that.

Barron Damon:

It was.

Barron Damon:

the ups and downs in them, you know, because I don't know how old your children

Barron Damon:

are, but they're becoming young adults and it doesn't, you know, every phase is

Barron Damon:

great and different, but I'm a coach now, I'm not just dad, you know, I'm, I'm, I'm

Barron Damon:

trying to coach them up and you can hear even some of that in the book, there was

Barron Damon:

some, obviously some spiritual lessons, but there was some life lessons too.

Barron Damon:

Like, as a father, let me talk to you about your situation and your

Barron Damon:

issue, and hopefully you can handle it

Barron Damon:

this

Tim Winders:

Yeah.

Tim Winders:

And I think the compassion that I saw was that, You, and I'm sure

Tim Winders:

you and your wife, were, were going through what they were going through.

Tim Winders:

And I, I, I think that is a reflection of our relationship with our Heavenly Father.

Tim Winders:

I feel very confident that He is going through what we are.

Tim Winders:

And sometimes we feel isolated.

Tim Winders:

And if that's not the case, we know it's the case.

Tim Winders:

Interesting.

Tim Winders:

Our son's name is Joshua also.

Tim Winders:

And

Barron Damon:

Oh, wow.

Tim Winders:

a few years older.

Tim Winders:

Our son is, he just turned 30 and our daughter's 33.

Tim Winders:

We're grandparents.

Tim Winders:

So let me

Tim Winders:

just, if you haven't experienced this, the best thing is when all of a

Tim Winders:

sudden the grandkids start showing up.

Tim Winders:

That's when things get really,

Barron Damon:

That's what they tell

Tim Winders:

really cool.

Tim Winders:

So, so Baron, another thing, because the, the theme of this is legacy.

Tim Winders:

My father passed away a little over a year and a half ago, with dementia and

Tim Winders:

cognitive issues and things like that.

Tim Winders:

And, and one of the things that I hungered for was to find

Tim Winders:

something that he had written.

Tim Winders:

And, he, he was a, an educator.

Tim Winders:

He had a successful career.

Tim Winders:

He communicated, he was a soft spoken communicator.

Tim Winders:

My mother used up about 98 percent of the words in the household,

Tim Winders:

if you know what I mean by that.

Tim Winders:

And, he had very few words.

Tim Winders:

And, and I, and I found at the age I was, I was just looking and I

Tim Winders:

couldn't find anything he had written.

Tim Winders:

And so to me, what you've done with this is you've really established what could

Tim Winders:

be some of the most powerful legacy items.

Tim Winders:

Listen, I know we're going to talk about finances and money and all of that.

Tim Winders:

To me, those things, and we've got good examples of this sometimes

Tim Winders:

become some of the least That we should discuss as far as legacy.

Tim Winders:

So did you have legacy in mind with the book?

Tim Winders:

I think you mentioned that earlier.

Tim Winders:

so you did want to

Tim Winders:

leave something with this book also, right?

Tim Winders:

It was a legacy gift, right?

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Barron Damon:

It was a legacy gift.

Barron Damon:

I some months back, I started, as a philanthropic coach, I started looking

Barron Damon:

at generational wealth and specifically the Rockefellers and my daughter, she was

Barron Damon:

working at the museum, the White House Museum, as an event kind of coordinator

Barron Damon:

while she was still in college.

Barron Damon:

And She sends us a, because we also have an event business.

Barron Damon:

So she sends us a table with the Rockefeller's name on it.

Barron Damon:

They were at that museum having the event and it just struck me.

Barron Damon:

I said, Hmm, Rockefeller was, that was over a hundred years ago.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

And here, my daughter at 23 years old.

Barron Damon:

name Rockefeller.

Barron Damon:

You know, I was fascinated by that.

Barron Damon:

So I started doing some research and found out that there are

Barron Damon:

seven generations strong.

Barron Damon:

and that's very unusual for even wealthy families.

Barron Damon:

They normally go for three generations.

Barron Damon:

And, so I was thinking about that and what could I do if I don't

Barron Damon:

have billions and Or millions that I can still leave this legacy.

Barron Damon:

And we have some legacy pieces, but I thought this book

Barron Damon:

would be one of those things.

Barron Damon:

If Amazon went out of business.

Barron Damon:

You still have your copy, right?

Barron Damon:

and the grandchildren could read it.

Barron Damon:

They can read it to their Children and then their Children, right?

Barron Damon:

I figure I can get at least three generations out of the book.

Barron Damon:

but that was the best part of it for me was for me to be able to say Look, you're

Barron Damon:

going to get it to an inheritance, right?

Barron Damon:

We're that's why that's wise to be able to do that.

Barron Damon:

and you're, you know, whether it's some material or some financial,

Barron Damon:

you'll get that, but if I can give you something that will last.

Barron Damon:

help your soul for years to come.

Barron Damon:

That's what, that's what we want to do.

Barron Damon:

And I think we, we were able to do that because Tim, guess

Barron Damon:

what's happening right now.

Barron Damon:

in January I told my family, I'm a step back and I want you guys to take the lead.

Barron Damon:

And so now everybody is writing on Monday.

Barron Damon:

We just pick a Monday to write.

Tim Winders:

Very good.

Tim Winders:

So they're participating and really, so what you're doing, this is legacy

Tim Winders:

stuff too, is that not only are you creating and, you know, doing something

Tim Winders:

that can be seen, words on paper.

Tim Winders:

Can be seen for generations.

Tim Winders:

And, and, and I was reading something recently about the, the Dead Sea Scrolls,

Tim Winders:

and I'm just thinking to myself, wow, the the legacy of something that has been

Tim Winders:

written for thousands of

Tim Winders:

years.

Tim Winders:

And, and now what you're doing is you're teaching.

Tim Winders:

That's really the, you know, preparing the next generation as

Tim Winders:

you're preparing them for that.

Tim Winders:

That's good.

Tim Winders:

You know, it reminds me of, we, gosh, it's been a couple of years now.

Tim Winders:

We interviewed Mitzi Perdue here, and she was from two

Tim Winders:

pretty strong legacy families.

Tim Winders:

She married

Tim Winders:

into the Perdue family.

Tim Winders:

And then

Tim Winders:

she had a, her family that she was a part of was a hotel family

Tim Winders:

for three, four generations.

Tim Winders:

There was

Tim Winders:

one thing that they did.

Tim Winders:

I asked her a good bit.

Tim Winders:

We had a little bit of a conversation about this and

Tim Winders:

I know you'll appreciate it.

Tim Winders:

She said that one of the things that they require or ask, or I don't know

Tim Winders:

exactly how they do it, was when people reach 60 years old in their

Tim Winders:

family, they write their autobiography.

Tim Winders:

And they've got,

Tim Winders:

if it's not published, that's fine, but they have a library

Tim Winders:

in their family, you know,

Tim Winders:

library where they put it there.

Tim Winders:

And I think that is so powerful.

Tim Winders:

And, and it seems as if you're, you're, you're training for that.

Tim Winders:

anyway, that's, that's, that's good.

Barron Damon:

Let

Tim Winders:

so let's talk though.

Barron Damon:

me get you before we transition.

Barron Damon:

when my son was 13 years old.

Barron Damon:

So when I first became a Christian, I wrote all these scriptures down,

Barron Damon:

you know, you're just trying to digest the word and all of that.

Barron Damon:

And I had probably a hundred scriptures.

Barron Damon:

And when he turned 13, I laminated those scriptures.

Barron Damon:

I mean, this was 1992, the scriptures, right?

Barron Damon:

And they tattered and all of that, but I laminated them.

Barron Damon:

And on his birthday, we had a birthday party for him.

Barron Damon:

And I gave him those scriptures, those same ones that I used when I

Barron Damon:

first became a Christian, and that was, you know, pretty powerful.

Barron Damon:

He didn't really.

Barron Damon:

Understand it at first.

Barron Damon:

But as he grew in his faith, he began to understand how important that was.

Tim Winders:

I think it's interesting.

Tim Winders:

You brought this up earlier that you weren't sure, especially with your

Tim Winders:

son, that he was grasping, even when you were sending out your Monday

Tim Winders:

morning items and, and the way I think about things like that, I wonder if

Tim Winders:

there are times that with my heavenly father, I've done similar, where

Tim Winders:

he's poured something out to me and I've almost, I haven't ignored it.

Tim Winders:

It's, it's, it's been

Barron Damon:

Yeah,

Tim Winders:

taken root, but I haven't acknowledged it.

Tim Winders:

There's so much value

Tim Winders:

to acknowledging that, right?

Tim Winders:

Doesn't it make you feel so good?

Barron Damon:

exactly.

Barron Damon:

Exactly.

Barron Damon:

we're not, we're not at the take action stage yet, right?

Tim Winders:

All right.

Tim Winders:

so that word legacy to me is so rich.

Tim Winders:

It has so much to it.

Tim Winders:

And yes, there's a financial component.

Tim Winders:

But one of the things I love Baron that we've done here in this portion

Tim Winders:

of the conversation is we've talked about the family portion of it.

Tim Winders:

We've talked about obviously writing and passing along things, but to me,

Tim Winders:

especially the scriptures that say you should leave an inheritance, not just

Tim Winders:

for your children, but your children's children, if we leave them all of these

Tim Winders:

assets, I'll call them these we'll call them even worldly assets, We know

Tim Winders:

that those treasures may or may not last forever.

Tim Winders:

But to me, the legacy is the relationship with earthly father,

Tim Winders:

like you've talked about, and then heavenly father speak briefly

Tim Winders:

about that before we kind of go down into the financial component of the giving and

Tim Winders:

all that, just speak about the importance of that foundation, because many people.

Tim Winders:

And we've seen it.

Tim Winders:

We've got examples of this in our culture that they've been

Tim Winders:

left a nice big inheritance,

Tim Winders:

but yet they don't have the soul, the healthy soul to handle it.

Tim Winders:

Talk some about that.

Barron Damon:

yeah.

Barron Damon:

You know, I grew up in a Christian home, even though I was probably, probably

Barron Damon:

Far away from that as you can be.

Barron Damon:

My father was a pastor for 15 years.

Barron Damon:

and I had no desire whatsoever to be a Christian.

Barron Damon:

I thought it was good for them, but I was on a different level, right?

Barron Damon:

So called I was, you know, educated and, and, and clever

Barron Damon:

and I can do this and do that.

Barron Damon:

And of course, I realized.

Barron Damon:

Real quickly that, that wasn't the plan God had for me.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

I mean, I was a person who really had to hit rock bottom.

Barron Damon:

I really, I really did because I was so self sufficient, in who I was and

Barron Damon:

who I thought I was, And even though, I mean, when I went to college, Tim,

Barron Damon:

I probably couldn't quote you two scriptures and I stayed in church.

Barron Damon:

I mean, you know, on Sundays and Wednesdays and all the other days.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

but the foundation was set.

Barron Damon:

And I saw my grandparents, as well were in the faith.

Barron Damon:

And so it was important for us, my, my wife and I, and her parents, you know,

Barron Damon:

like my parents at the time, been married for 40, you know, 50 years and, love

Barron Damon:

God and had a standard of living, you know, a standard of holiness, not just.

Barron Damon:

Name recognition.

Barron Damon:

Oh, I'm a Christian.

Barron Damon:

Yeah, but serious about a relationship with God and that's something that was

Barron Damon:

really important to me that I wanted to make sure I pass it down to, to my

Barron Damon:

children and not just to say, cause at one point, you know, I think the

Barron Damon:

statistic was 78 percent of the people identified as being a Christian.

Barron Damon:

I don't know what that number is now, but that's very different

Barron Damon:

from having a relationship.

Barron Damon:

And I wanted to stress to them that it was so important for you to have a

Barron Damon:

relationship with your heavenly father.

Barron Damon:

And if you got that, and I can show you example of what that could look like from

Barron Damon:

the natural perspective, you would be, you'd be healthy, be happy, and holy.

Tim Winders:

So one thing, interesting, I didn't know you were a preacher's kid.

Tim Winders:

This is,

Tim Winders:

It causes me to, causes me to ask a couple more questions here.

Tim Winders:

Sometimes I'm always amazed, there's typical preacher's

Tim Winders:

kids do one of two things.

Tim Winders:

They, they totally rebel and go the opposite direction.

Tim Winders:

And it sounds

Tim Winders:

like you were skirting that a little bit.

Tim Winders:

Maybe you, I think sometimes you see too much.

Tim Winders:

You see too much of behind the scenes and all that's going on.

Tim Winders:

And then.

Tim Winders:

There's other folks that they, I don't know if they want to try to prove

Tim Winders:

something or something like that.

Tim Winders:

Sometimes that may be more with, with with females, but, but it, it

Tim Winders:

always perplexes me, see, I didn't grow up around church at all.

Tim Winders:

We,

Tim Winders:

we, we popped in from time to time.

Tim Winders:

I didn't, I didn't, you know, the Lord reeled me in through a beautiful

Tim Winders:

young lady named Glory that I.

Tim Winders:

Was smitten with and then got married.

Tim Winders:

And, you know, that's when I had my literal come to Jesus moment.

Tim Winders:

And but with you, you were around it, you were exposed.

Tim Winders:

Did you see too much?

Tim Winders:

Was there too much of like, Ooh, I see how this church, these church people are.

Tim Winders:

And I don't know, or what was the story, man?

Tim Winders:

Why, why are you running?

Tim Winders:

You mentioned self sufficient.

Tim Winders:

I get that.

Tim Winders:

I get that.

Barron Damon:

You know, you know, to me, the church that I was a part

Barron Damon:

of, it was a very strong biblical based church and, but it was boring.

Barron Damon:

I mean, boring.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

And so here I am, you know, it's kind of very well known kind of star

Barron Damon:

athlete and just kind of doing my thing, you know, friends everywhere.

Barron Damon:

And then I will go to church.

Barron Damon:

And the young people there, they would see me on the news or some

Barron Damon:

highlights, sports highlight, and they want it seemed like my life, you know,

Barron Damon:

opposed to me wanting their life.

Barron Damon:

And so I was like, well, I'll become a Christian.

Barron Damon:

They want to be like me.

Barron Damon:

You know, so it was just no appeal during that time.

Barron Damon:

Now, if I was probably in another, another congregation where they had

Barron Damon:

youth ministry and it was active and live, that would probably have been

Barron Damon:

different, but that wasn't my story.

Barron Damon:

So I just didn't see what was appealing to me.

Tim Winders:

so the, oh man, I got to, I got to ask this, it's going

Tim Winders:

to, I don't think this will be an awkward conversation, but for those

Tim Winders:

listening in and they know me, I'm, I'm a white guy, Barron's African

Tim Winders:

American, and I have rarely heard people.

Tim Winders:

That have been around, primarily African American churches say that they're boring.

Tim Winders:

So you gotta, you gotta dispel some rumors or you gotta clarify

Tim Winders:

something for me because I went to a multicultural racial church for

Tim Winders:

the longest when I first got saved.

Tim Winders:

And part of what I loved was the music that came with the diversity.

Tim Winders:

Does that make sense?

Tim Winders:

Did I

Tim Winders:

say that well?

Barron Damon:

Oh, yeah.

Barron Damon:

Oh,

Tim Winders:

was boring.

Tim Winders:

Come on now, Baron, you're messing with me here.

Barron Damon:

Hey, I mean, there was there was many a days where my head was nodding.

Barron Damon:

You know, I was tired from a football game or basketball game or tracked me.

Barron Damon:

But, the music was hymns.

Barron Damon:

You know, the Bible talks about spiritual hymns, right?

Barron Damon:

Hymns are great.

Barron Damon:

I, I still, sometimes when I'm being really reflective, those

Barron Damon:

hymns come back to my heart that I've learned during that time.

Barron Damon:

but the teaching was good, but it just wasn't, it just wasn't, and I'm not a.

Barron Damon:

theatrical person, right?

Barron Damon:

You don't have to put your finger in your ear and hold your head

Barron Damon:

back and start screaming for me to feel the spirit, right?

Barron Damon:

But, it was just different.

Barron Damon:

Now, my experience quickly changed when I went to another church, denomination,

Barron Damon:

the Church of God in Christ, And there was nothing boring about that experience.

Barron Damon:

it was like, calisthenics, you know, during the worship

Tim Winders:

The, the Lord shows up when there's a bass and some

Tim Winders:

drums up on the stage, right?

Barron Damon:

Exactly.

Barron Damon:

Exactly.

Barron Damon:

So I, I had these very different experiences and I also went to an all

Barron Damon:

white church, called good morning Jesus.

Barron Damon:

And we were the, it was hundreds of people in there.

Barron Damon:

We were the only black.

Barron Damon:

So, Yeah, I've had some diverse experiences, but now I actually attend

Barron Damon:

a multicultural, church and I absolutely love, we have Hispanic ministry and,

Barron Damon:

Asian ministry and, half white, half black Africans, you know, you, you name it, we

Barron Damon:

have it.

Barron Damon:

And I really enjoy that experience because it's not just the music I like.

Barron Damon:

It's music.

Barron Damon:

You know, that everybody can participate and enjoy.

Tim Winders:

Yeah, the cool thing, I think that's the way the kingdom of God looks.

Tim Winders:

And I like when I hear about situations like that, I was very similar.

Tim Winders:

I, I was just, I was a kid of the seventies and eighties and

Tim Winders:

I wanted to make me some money.

Tim Winders:

And I

Tim Winders:

just kept in church world.

Tim Winders:

I kept seeing just nothing that appealed to me or excited me.

Tim Winders:

I saw some, you know, man, be pambi preachers and stuff like that.

Tim Winders:

And so anyway, but obviously the Lord got our attention and we,

Tim Winders:

we stepped in and Things like

Tim Winders:

that.

Tim Winders:

Um, let's talk, let's move.

Tim Winders:

I think that's important part of the legacy though.

Tim Winders:

And, and so what's been, what's been some significant things along the

Tim Winders:

way, positive or negative, by the way, I think if I were to tell my

Tim Winders:

story, there's a few negative things.

Tim Winders:

I don't like to use the word failure negative that probably have drawn me

Tim Winders:

closer to thinking about these topics than anything else, and we don't shy

Tim Winders:

away from You know, the ugly stuff here, if you, if we have to go into that,

Tim Winders:

but Barron, what have been a couple of significant events along the way that

Tim Winders:

have led you to this place now where you call yourself a philanthropic coach?

Barron Damon:

Well, the main one was when I went to college, my second semester in

Barron Damon:

college, I was headed back to my dorm.

Barron Damon:

My cousin was visiting us and I was just leaving our campus party.

Barron Damon:

And I heard this, I heard some voices behind me.

Barron Damon:

A guy say specifically, That somebody is going for a swim tonight.

Barron Damon:

And I was walking by a reflection pond and I really didn't pay attention

Barron Damon:

because there was a few people outside.

Barron Damon:

Not a lot.

Barron Damon:

Next thing I know, Tim, a guy came from behind and hit me with this fist.

Barron Damon:

And I mean, if you've never been hit by somebody with your fist, I mean,

Barron Damon:

it hurts, but I was so shocked and stunned that it happened that I just

Barron Damon:

took off running, you know, and that was really defining moment in my life.

Barron Damon:

And I think that really epitomize you know, what I was doing,

Barron Damon:

running, you know, from God.

Barron Damon:

And I could, I mean, I ran because I was running a 45 in high school.

Barron Damon:

So I was moving, 10 100.

Barron Damon:

So I started running.

Barron Damon:

And just running in the guy came behind me because it was multiple people.

Barron Damon:

We found out later on that they were actually going on these

Barron Damon:

college campuses and they was just picking people out randomly.

Barron Damon:

I call them random acts of violence.

Barron Damon:

and we ended up getting to a tussle.

Barron Damon:

Police came and put us in the police car and said, what's going on, guys?

Barron Damon:

Of course.

Barron Damon:

You know, it's two African American males.

Barron Damon:

and the guy said he was talking about my mother.

Barron Damon:

And I said, I've never seen him before, you know, and it was just one of those

Barron Damon:

situations that escalated, but when I got out the police car and went back

Barron Damon:

to my dorm, I was embarrassed, you know, just ashamed of what happened.

Barron Damon:

I was hurt and I was discouraged.

Barron Damon:

Here I am on the college campus where I wanted to feel safe.

Barron Damon:

And he took that away from me.

Barron Damon:

He robbed me of that.

Barron Damon:

and I started having all kinds of emotional challenges as a result of that.

Barron Damon:

And then I ended up getting, I went, I went home for a couple of weeks

Barron Damon:

and came back, took the exams, did horrible, and ended up, you know,

Barron Damon:

failing that semester horrible, horribly.

Barron Damon:

And then, I was on academic scholarship.

Barron Damon:

And so I was put on probation and then eventually lost my scholarship.

Barron Damon:

And so my life just started unraveling.

Barron Damon:

You know, I mean, I can't now when I even think about it and I tell the story how

Barron Damon:

quickly it happened, you know, from this kind of celebrated person to somebody who

Barron Damon:

got kicked out of school, lost everything, friends and even tell my family members.

Barron Damon:

I didn't tell my, my, my, my parents because I was ashamed and didn't know.

Barron Damon:

I didn't want to put a burden of finances on them because,

Barron Damon:

you know, I was on scholarship.

Barron Damon:

and so it just went from bad to worse really quickly.

Barron Damon:

And, but it was that, that season of my life that God was in hot pursuit.

Barron Damon:

You know, the Bible says for whomever he loved, he chased

Barron Damon:

and it was a full, full sprint.

Barron Damon:

And I remember the night I accepted Christ as my personal savior.

Barron Damon:

I said, God, if you just leave me alone, I'll serve you.

Barron Damon:

You know, that's the optic word, right?

Tim Winders:

That

Tim Winders:

makes no

Barron Damon:

just leave me alone.

Barron Damon:

and that night in the loft of my sister's house, I accepted Christ

Barron Damon:

and my life changed in the instant.

Barron Damon:

and as a result during that time, I did a, internship at the Columbia urban league,

Barron Damon:

and it was a interesting, internship because it was stopped the violence.

Barron Damon:

God has an interesting sense of humor, right?

Barron Damon:

Here I am was assaulted by some young men, and now God puts me

Barron Damon:

in a place where I have to help.

Barron Damon:

help young people who are dealing with all kinds of issues.

Barron Damon:

And it was the longest summer of my life because all I wanted to do like

Barron Damon:

you, I just wanted to make some money.

Barron Damon:

I want to drive a nice car, have a corner office.

Barron Damon:

I can look over the city, you know, but that wasn't the plan.

Barron Damon:

And at the end of the summer, I was so glad Tim, I was like,

Barron Damon:

woof, I'm glad this is over.

Barron Damon:

and I said, those kids need some help.

Barron Damon:

I don't know who's going to help them.

Barron Damon:

And God said, Hmm, that would be you.

Barron Damon:

I was like, what are you talking about?

Barron Damon:

You know, like Willis back in the day, when you talk about God.

Tim Winders:

We just showed our age there.

Tim Winders:

Someone is going to go, what do

Barron Damon:

Yeah, I know.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

I gave, I teed it up.

Barron Damon:

I teed it up.

Barron Damon:

but it was interesting because.

Barron Damon:

that was the moment where things shifted for me and I applied for one

Barron Damon:

job and I got a call from the CEO, executive director for Big Brothers,

Barron Damon:

Big Sisters, and she was a believer.

Barron Damon:

So God had this thing all kind of sorted out.

Barron Damon:

And she says to me, she said, Baron, I saw your resume and

Barron Damon:

if you, she said, opened it.

Barron Damon:

And it was 130 something applications or resumes.

Barron Damon:

And yours came opened up, you know, I saw yours and she said, the

Barron Damon:

Holy Spirit told me to call you.

Barron Damon:

And I was like, what?

Barron Damon:

You know, cause I'm just getting familiar with this whole notion of the Holy Spirit.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

And so she calls me in, I go talk to her and she said, I don't know why

Barron Damon:

you, but you supposed to be here.

Barron Damon:

And that's the only job I applied for.

Barron Damon:

And I worked for big brothers, big sisters in South Carolina, North

Barron Damon:

Carolina for the next 20 years.

Barron Damon:

So that was my first kind of exposure to, giving back and God really taught

Barron Damon:

me empathy, which I did not have before.

Barron Damon:

I didn't care about anything but me.

Barron Damon:

And when I started seeing some of the challenges and issues that people

Barron Damon:

were having, I mean, real life issues.

Barron Damon:

I was like, whoa, this is some serious stuff.

Barron Damon:

And God just began to massage my heart and get me to a place

Barron Damon:

where I actually cared about other people and I wanted to help them.

Barron Damon:

And I got to a point where I started serving them, which was different, but

Barron Damon:

it was a, you know, a process for me.

Tim Winders:

One of the things that comes up often here when we talk

Tim Winders:

about this journey or leadership journey or whatever that people go on

Tim Winders:

Baron is we, we use this word.

Tim Winders:

I think it's thrown around a lot in our society and culture.

Tim Winders:

The word success, like we were talking about earlier, love,

Tim Winders:

you know, we're using some big

Tim Winders:

words here.

Tim Winders:

We've got philanthropy and legacy and all that.

Tim Winders:

Well, well, word success is something that we, it's fascinated me because

Tim Winders:

very similar to you, I think I was living for myself of the time.

Tim Winders:

And then when an event occurred for me, I don't think the Lord

Tim Winders:

brought it on, but I think he

Tim Winders:

used it to get

Tim Winders:

my attention.

Tim Winders:

It sounds like that's what happened with you.

Tim Winders:

So tell me, and it could be brief or, you know, we still have a few minutes.

Tim Winders:

How did you define success on?

Tim Winders:

And then if you could contrast it with how you define success now, as best

Tim Winders:

you can, you know, this could be a deeper question, but just contrast your

Tim Winders:

definitions of success over the last, you know, 20 years, you know, whatever,

Tim Winders:

go back and then compare it to today.

Barron Damon:

Success for, for me years ago was definitely money,

Barron Damon:

possessions and recognition.

Barron Damon:

You know, simple is that, my mother, passed away and before she passed

Barron Damon:

away, she, she struggled with, depression for a number of years.

Barron Damon:

God just healed her miraculously.

Barron Damon:

Her last several years, she was just at peace and happy.

Barron Damon:

as a matter of fact, I wrote her a poem called living free.

Barron Damon:

And as a result of that, I began to think about success very differently.

Barron Damon:

I was like, here, my mom is.

Barron Damon:

You know, she don't have a whole lot, but she was at peace and she was just as happy

Barron Damon:

and God had delivered her and healed her.

Barron Damon:

She was like a brand new person.

Barron Damon:

And I'm sitting here just kind of, you know, finished school by then

Barron Damon:

and went back to get my master's degree in trying to build businesses.

Barron Damon:

I'm like, I'm struggling.

Barron Damon:

I don't feel that same peace.

Barron Damon:

You know, and I started that process of redefining what success was for me.

Barron Damon:

And my son really helped me.

Barron Damon:

He was probably three years old and we were in the car one day.

Barron Damon:

And he said to me, we was out all day.

Barron Damon:

I mean, just literally all day going to parks and doing different stuff.

Barron Damon:

And we were going home.

Barron Damon:

He said, dad, what's next?

Barron Damon:

He said, what's next?

Barron Damon:

And I said, son, what are you talking about?

Barron Damon:

We've been gone all day.

Barron Damon:

We're going home.

Barron Damon:

He said, what's next?

Barron Damon:

And then God reminded me, he said, this is you.

Barron Damon:

This is your life.

Barron Damon:

You always talk about what's next.

Barron Damon:

You don't take time to appreciate the blessings, the

Barron Damon:

things I've helped you with.

Barron Damon:

I brought you through.

Barron Damon:

You just want to get to the next.

Barron Damon:

And I started Tim, that process of changing how I thought about success.

Barron Damon:

It wasn't about the next thing to conquer, but it was the focus on my family.

Barron Damon:

I say my relationship with God, my family and the community in which I serve.

Barron Damon:

And if I do those things.

Barron Damon:

I'm very successful.

Barron Damon:

I'm a very successful person, you know, because my family, they love me.

Barron Damon:

and they're happy and I served my community.

Barron Damon:

Well, I served my church well.

Barron Damon:

and and I served my clients well in business, and I think that's important.

Barron Damon:

So I feel like I am very successful.

Tim Winders:

I think that's good.

Tim Winders:

I we've interviewed, talked to a number of people where this comes up.

Tim Winders:

And what you

Tim Winders:

said, you said it in some different words, but it, it really is my story.

Tim Winders:

I think it's a lot of stories and and I've heard people say that they had

Tim Winders:

an addiction to more or someone worded

Tim Winders:

it, that they were actually addicted to tomorrow, which is what your

Tim Winders:

three year old son brought up to you.

Tim Winders:

It's like, You know, I remember our

Tim Winders:

daughter one time, we, you know, my wife and I are thinking we're at Disney world.

Tim Winders:

This is the greatest thing ever.

Tim Winders:

You know, they should be enjoying this.

Tim Winders:

And our daughter said something to the effect of where's our next vacation.

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Tim Winders:

We're

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Tim Winders:

Disney world here.

Tim Winders:

Come on,

Barron Damon:

I spent thousands of on this vacation.

Tim Winders:

let's enjoy the moment.

Tim Winders:

And, but you know what I think it's.

Tim Winders:

I think the enemy, I think that's the biggest thing that the enemy

Tim Winders:

does for people that are wired, that, that are wired like we are.

Tim Winders:

So let's shift a bit.

Tim Winders:

Let's move into this legacy conversation with what you're talking

Tim Winders:

about now that we've, I think we've laid a very good foundation for

Tim Winders:

talking about some of the practical things, because I think if people

Tim Winders:

don't get some of those items, this is

Tim Winders:

really just a spreadsheet type conversation.

Tim Winders:

And I don't think legacy is spreadsheet.

Tim Winders:

And I think I'm supposed to pause and let you respond to that.

Tim Winders:

So what would you like to say with that comment?

Tim Winders:

I just made that legacy isn't just about the spreadsheets.

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Barron Damon:

Legacy.

Barron Damon:

I, when I first started talking about legacy, probably about two years

Barron Damon:

ago, I, when people hear the word legacy, they think about death, right?

Barron Damon:

They think about, like, what I need to do afterward or something.

Barron Damon:

And I remember, you know, having conversations with people and saying.

Barron Damon:

I want you to think about death, but just for a minute, because when

Barron Damon:

you think about death, hopefully it'll make you think about life.

Barron Damon:

And that's when we started having the conversation about live

Barron Damon:

your legacy, opposed to just.

Barron Damon:

you know, the legacy conversation and thinking about the afterward.

Barron Damon:

And so that live your legacy conversation that we have now is

Barron Damon:

what are you doing this moment today that will help you start, creating

Barron Damon:

the impact that you want to have.

Barron Damon:

And so when that dash, when you do get to the dash, right, and we all will get

Barron Damon:

to the dash, what do you want it to say?

Barron Damon:

And most of the time people are not thinking about it like that.

Barron Damon:

I was on a podcast with this young guy, business owner.

Barron Damon:

And when I met with him first, you know, you know, you had the pre conversation.

Barron Damon:

He said, Baron, it's all you want to talk about.

Barron Damon:

He said, that's all you got, you know, and I was like, kind of held back because it

Barron Damon:

was the first time I was doing a podcast, and, and during the conversation, after

Barron Damon:

the conversation, he was like, wow, he was like, I never thought about, he

Barron Damon:

said, I'm 27 years old, starting this company, and I never thought about it

Barron Damon:

from that perspective, and so we challenge even young people to think about how

Barron Damon:

you want to live your legacy right now.

Tim Winders:

The interesting thing about that is my wife and I, towards the tail

Tim Winders:

end of last year, we were recording this in, you know, I guess early or mid spring

Tim Winders:

ish of, of 2024 tail end of last year, we kept feeling the nudge that the Lord

Tim Winders:

wanted us to understand the word eternity.

Tim Winders:

More or better.

Tim Winders:

I don't think our human minds could ever grasp it on this side,

Tim Winders:

on this realm that we're in and,

Tim Winders:

and what you're talking about is thinking more, you know, not in the negative

Tim Winders:

way we were talking about earlier of kind of being addicted to tomorrow or

Tim Winders:

addicted to what's next, but, but thinking more long term, bigger picture, what's

Tim Winders:

beyond me and, and a lot of people.

Tim Winders:

We'll think this is money and financial.

Tim Winders:

And so why don't we for a few minutes here, go ahead and talk about

Tim Winders:

the money in the financial piece.

Tim Winders:

I know as a philanthropic, you know, coach and as you know, with, with giving

Tim Winders:

and all that, that money's part of it.

Tim Winders:

So let's go ahead and just lay that on the table, talk about

Tim Winders:

money and how it fits in with this.

Barron Damon:

Yeah.

Barron Damon:

And so money is, as you know, Tim, it's just a vehicle, right?

Barron Damon:

It's just a vehicle, a tool that we can, we can use, for a variety of things.

Barron Damon:

I choose to help people focus on, helping others with it.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

And so we do work with financial advisors and we work with estate planners and

Barron Damon:

attorneys because, the bottom line is.

Barron Damon:

People want to pay less taxes, right?

Barron Damon:

Because Uncle Sam is going to get 40%.

Barron Damon:

and that's the bottom line, right?

Barron Damon:

And so I would rather show you help you prepare, and reduce those

Barron Damon:

taxes and feel good about it.

Barron Damon:

And a lot of times that's what financial advisors talk to me.

Barron Damon:

They said, you know, bear, I have this person who is, I

Barron Damon:

mean, making a lot of money.

Barron Damon:

They don't have time to do philanthropy stuff.

Barron Damon:

I was like, they need to make time, you know, because if not, they're just

Barron Damon:

giving that money away to Uncle Sam.

Barron Damon:

And I'm sure Sam loves to get it.

Barron Damon:

But there's some organizations out there, that could use it.

Barron Damon:

And so we help them, you know, we go behind the veil, so to speak, and we

Barron Damon:

help them create their philanthropic why.

Barron Damon:

Because that's part of the big challenge.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

They don't know the issues that they care about.

Barron Damon:

Because I didn't care about no issues.

Barron Damon:

You know, you asked me 25 years ago or so.

Barron Damon:

I'm like, I don't know what I care about.

Barron Damon:

and just because people have some resources or you don't have resources,

Barron Damon:

you might not have any issues that that's really important to you that you really

Barron Damon:

care about or want to invest your time, your talent, or your treasure with.

Barron Damon:

And so we help them discover that.

Barron Damon:

And once they discover that and start getting empowered by that,

Barron Damon:

We helped them create their mission and their vision around it.

Barron Damon:

we created years ago.

Barron Damon:

One of the best things we did was create a mission for our family, right?

Barron Damon:

And this is the thing that guides us as a family.

Barron Damon:

25 years later, 26 years later, it guides us.

Barron Damon:

And so we want that same mission and vision to guide our clients in terms of.

Barron Damon:

What they want to do philanthropically.

Barron Damon:

And then we put a whole strategic plan together and we have a team of

Barron Damon:

researchers and they research for for us.

Barron Damon:

I mean, for the for them.

Barron Damon:

We know people don't have a lot of time.

Barron Damon:

They're not thinking about philanthropy.

Barron Damon:

We talked about that at the onset of the show, right?

Barron Damon:

But we want them to carve out some time, but we're going to take the time

Barron Damon:

to help them do the due diligence.

Barron Damon:

And that's really important.

Barron Damon:

The word.

Barron Damon:

We've been using big words there, right?

Barron Damon:

Due diligence is important because we take the burden off of them

Barron Damon:

and remove some of those barriers and do all the work for them.

Barron Damon:

But we empower them with the information that we have so they can make the

Barron Damon:

decision that aligns with their deepest

Tim Winders:

Right.

Tim Winders:

So Baron, do you, the first thing that.

Tim Winders:

Kind of came to mind when you were talking about the need to understand

Tim Winders:

their mission or their vision.

Tim Winders:

I do wonder how many people really understand where they

Tim Winders:

would like those resources to go.

Tim Winders:

I mean, I, I guess maybe this is I'll, I'll pose it in the form of a question.

Tim Winders:

How many people that come to you say, listen, we want to support Blank.

Tim Winders:

We, we want to help eradicate sex trafficking, just as an example.

Tim Winders:

And we want, you know, 80 percent of our financial resources to go towards that.

Tim Winders:

To me, my guess is most people that come to you haven't gotten anywhere

Tim Winders:

near defining something like that.

Tim Winders:

Would that be correct?

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

That would be correct.

Barron Damon:

and a lot of times, even when people have, and the research says, if people have

Barron Damon:

donate advised funds, right, those are funds that you can put away, get the tax

Barron Damon:

break, and they just kind of sit there.

Barron Damon:

and part of the challenge is that, people have with donate advised

Barron Damon:

fund, the money is accumulating, but they're not giving it away.

Barron Damon:

and they supposed to, because that's a part of this, tax benefit.

Barron Damon:

and so we help even those people who say, man, I have this money

Barron Damon:

just kind of sitting there.

Barron Damon:

What can I do with it?

Barron Damon:

And if, if they have a vehicle, at least.

Barron Damon:

They are ready to have that conversation.

Barron Damon:

and 75 percent of the people who at least have some kind of vehicle, it

Barron Damon:

could be a foundation like we have, or it could be a donated advice fund.

Barron Damon:

They're ready now to at least have a conversation about

Barron Damon:

where we want to put the money.

Barron Damon:

So there's two, two issues.

Barron Damon:

The first one I mentioned is they don't know issues they care about.

Barron Damon:

And then secondly, they don't know where the money is going to go.

Tim Winders:

Right.

Tim Winders:

So let's talk about where the money goes.

Tim Winders:

I love talking structure.

Tim Winders:

I had a trust conversation with a client that I work with yesterday.

Tim Winders:

done a lot of real estate and I'm not a

Tim Winders:

lawyer, not an accountant, but I know way too much about this stuff.

Tim Winders:

We actually, our family has a family foundation.

Tim Winders:

Also, I noticed that you've got a foundation.

Tim Winders:

We're not going to go into details on them, but just

Tim Winders:

talk about some of the, the tools or structures that, and we're probably

Tim Winders:

going to give people enough information to say, I got to talk to Barron

Tim Winders:

here, but what are some of them?

Tim Winders:

We mentioned foundation, which, you know, it can be a 501 C3.

Tim Winders:

It can be an operating or whatever, but talk about some of those, just

Tim Winders:

kind of lay a few of those out for us.

Barron Damon:

So I think the one that's most popular that I just mentioned, the

Barron Damon:

donor advised fund, and you can start those funds with, we started with 5, 000.

Barron Damon:

My wife got a bonus on her job and we decided that we were going to put

Barron Damon:

that 5, 000 in and it removed some of the, The work for that particular

Barron Damon:

philanthropist or donor because they don't have to worry about from a tax

Barron Damon:

perspective, they, that, that organization where they put the money in, they

Barron Damon:

do all the back office stuff, right?

Barron Damon:

So at the end of the year, they send you the receipts, all the information,

Barron Damon:

but you just go online and select the nonprofit that you want to support.

Barron Damon:

And they've done some due diligence, not like what we do, but at least they know

Barron Damon:

if that organization is a legal 501c3.

Barron Damon:

and then you have more advanced vehicles like a charitable lead trust.

Barron Damon:

You know, that's something that, people can take advantage of where, you know,

Barron Damon:

for 20 years, your family members, beneficiaries can get the money.

Barron Damon:

And then, for the next, however much money you have, a nonprofit could be

Barron Damon:

designated to get that money, right?

Barron Damon:

That's a, that's a wonderful vehicle.

Barron Damon:

If you want to go that route, a But you can also do something like a, a channel

Barron Damon:

remainder trust where the nonprofit gets the remainder of the money up front.

Barron Damon:

And so there's different ways I was reading.

Barron Damon:

I'm actually taking my, my license, my life and health

Barron Damon:

insurance license right now.

Barron Damon:

and I was reading about annuities.

Barron Damon:

I was like, Ooh, I gotta be able to tell my clients about there's some annuities

Barron Damon:

that you can use for charitable giving.

Barron Damon:

And so all of those, all of those are wonderful opportunities.

Barron Damon:

to, you know, do philanthropic giving through those

Tim Winders:

Sure.

Tim Winders:

And those are things that people probably have interest is.

Tim Winders:

Peaked.

Tim Winders:

They need to gather more information.

Tim Winders:

I think one thing I'd love to do here in our last few minutes, Baron,

Tim Winders:

is I'd love for you to speak to someone who is, they're listening

Tim Winders:

in and they're intrigued, but they don't really know how to get started.

Tim Winders:

Maybe that means pick up the phone and call you, but let's

Tim Winders:

just assume that they're, they may not think they're ready for that.

Tim Winders:

And they just want to kind of start getting in the mindset or getting some

Tim Winders:

practical things going along just to get started with this, philanthropic mindset

Tim Winders:

and also what, what could you tell people maybe a few tips or just some get started

Tim Winders:

items to think in a philanthropic way,

Barron Damon:

The first thing I would say, and Tim, I will send you a free PDF that,

Barron Damon:

you know, I love to give to people because I always say, if you don't work with me,

Barron Damon:

if you give, I'm still benefiting, right?

Barron Damon:

I don't know who you're giving to, but I'm still benefiting because I'm

Barron Damon:

a philanthropist and I love mankind.

Barron Damon:

Right.

Barron Damon:

so the first thing they can do is decide what does you care about?

Barron Damon:

That's the number one thing you can do.

Barron Damon:

You can do some soul searching around that area.

Barron Damon:

What are some of the things, you may not even think about that you care about it,

Barron Damon:

but something maybe that irritates you.

Barron Damon:

You know, and sometime it comes through irritation.

Barron Damon:

You're like, I really don't like this particular thing.

Barron Damon:

That's something that you actually care about and start

Barron Damon:

exploring that a little bit more.

Barron Damon:

And then once you kind of figure that out, start doing

Barron Damon:

your research on the nonprofit.

Barron Damon:

and making sure the last thing you want to do is just like any investment, you

Barron Damon:

don't want to give your money away to an organization that's not going to value it

Barron Damon:

and they're not going to use it properly.

Barron Damon:

And sometimes, Matter of fact, I just had an article published, just

Barron Damon:

found out today that was published.

Barron Damon:

This is why nonprofits are good unless you've been catfished, right?

Barron Damon:

So, there's a lot of uncertainty out there.

Barron Damon:

Fifty one percent of the people say I don't give because I don't trust them.

Barron Damon:

I don't trust nonprofits.

Barron Damon:

And those are the two things you can do.

Barron Damon:

Figure out the, what you really care about and then do the research.

Barron Damon:

Or you can, if you have some money you want to donate, you can go, to

Barron Damon:

one of the, the community foundations and talk to somebody about opening

Barron Damon:

up, a DAAF, a Donate Advise Fund.

Barron Damon:

And that's a good way to kind of get started because at least

Barron Damon:

you can have it sitting there.

Barron Damon:

You know, because you've made that commitment to give it and say, you

Barron Damon:

know, I'm gonna put 5, 000, 10, 000.

Barron Damon:

I'm not sure exactly yet what I want to do, but at least I have

Barron Damon:

some time to start giving it away.

Barron Damon:

But once you put that money, it's irrevocable.

Barron Damon:

So it's not like, Oh, I changed my mind.

Barron Damon:

Let me get that back out and do something else with it.

Barron Damon:

That ain't happening.

Barron Damon:

so at least you can kind of lead with that.

Barron Damon:

And that will spur you on to, to make that decision about, starting

Barron Damon:

your philanthropic journey.

Tim Winders:

Great tips there, Baron, I appreciate that, especially for the

Tim Winders:

person that may not have even thought about any of that before this call.

Tim Winders:

If someone says they want to work with you or get more info from

Tim Winders:

you, where do you want them to go?

Tim Winders:

Direct them wherever this is where you could promote whatever you need to.

Tim Winders:

And if you do have a

Tim Winders:

PDF and we may include a link or something down in the notes, but

Tim Winders:

anything like that, share that now.

Barron Damon:

You can reach, reach me at baron damon.

Barron Damon:

com real simple, baron damon.

Barron Damon:

com or go to LinkedIn baron, Jay Damon, you can find me there and I respond

Barron Damon:

pretty quick and we'll, connect with you.

Barron Damon:

You can go to our website, business of life, right?

Barron Damon:

cc.

Barron Damon:

com as well.

Barron Damon:

but those are three main ways that you can get in contact with us.

Tim Winders:

Very good.

Tim Winders:

We'll include all that.

Tim Winders:

Make sure you reach out to Baron.

Tim Winders:

If you are intrigued or want to learn more Baron, we're seek go create

Tim Winders:

those three words, I'm either going to force or allow you to choose one of

Tim Winders:

those over the other two as my final question, seek, go or create and why.

Barron Damon:

I would say go and I would say go because this philanthropic

Barron Damon:

journey that I'm on, it's, it's my, my mission to go, you know, as the Bible

Barron Damon:

says, go out into the highways and the byways and share, share the gospel.

Barron Damon:

And we want to share the gospel.

Barron Damon:

We also want to talk to people the importance of giving, because

Barron Damon:

we see that through, through the Bible, all through the Bible.

Barron Damon:

And the greatest gift that was given to us was.

Barron Damon:

God's son, Jesus who died on the cross for us.

Barron Damon:

There's no greater gift.

Barron Damon:

And so I even talk about that when, you know, when I can, that great gift.

Barron Damon:

And we have a responsibility, to teach and share with the next generation,

Barron Damon:

how important it is to give back.

Barron Damon:

So I would say go into all the nations.

Tim Winders:

I appreciate that Baron.

Tim Winders:

I've enjoyed the conversation.

Tim Winders:

I loved, loved the money morning manna conversation.

Tim Winders:

We have loved

Tim Winders:

the conversation about giving and philanthropic giving and things like that.

Tim Winders:

I appreciate you joining us here.

Tim Winders:

Make sure you check out all Baron's.

Tim Winders:

Barron stuff.

Tim Winders:

We are SeatGoCreate.

Tim Winders:

We release new episodes here every Monday on YouTube and

Tim Winders:

your favorite podcast platform.

Tim Winders:

Your support does mean the world to us.

Tim Winders:

If you like what we're doing here, we invite you to support us

Tim Winders:

and you could do it financially.

Tim Winders:

Just go to SeatGoCreate.

Tim Winders:

com forward slash support.

Tim Winders:

And there's places there where you can make contributions for as little as 1.

Tim Winders:

Or as much as you would like, since we've been talking about giving, you can just be

Tim Winders:

in that giving mode and give some to, to what we're doing here at seek, go create.

Tim Winders:

You can also leave comments there that we love to get from you.

Tim Winders:

Make sure you visit seek, go create.

Tim Winders:

com forward slash support until next time.

Tim Winders:

We appreciate you being here until next time.

Tim Winders:

Continue being all that you were created to be.

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