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What could be in your water with Marianne Metzger. We talk water quality!
Episode 137130th July 2022 • Around the House® Home Improvement • Eric Goranson and Caroline Blazovsky
00:00:00 01:00:48

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What is in your drinking water in your home? Is it healthy enough to shower or bathe in? How about the new filtration systems out there. What works? Marianne Metzger spent most of her career working for an environmental labs mostly specializing in drinking water analysis, but also has experience with some waste water application and lead and asbestos testing in building materials. She has been published over 30 times in multiple trade publications with regard to water testing and treatment.

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Transcripts

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[00:00:09] Eric Goranson: Okay. I got a question that is probably the most controversial water thing in the world. Fluoride in the drinking water.

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[00:00:22] Eric Goranson: this is how we make yeah. Everyone mad in our listening audience. All at walks.

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[00:00:34] Marianne Metzger: So, I mean, we are adding it to our water. Um, they're not, they should not be adding it in an amount to where, you know, it would cause significant damage, but here's the thing. Um, the way that they add it, they have a hard time controlling the levels. So you could, you could end up with a slug of fluoride in the water that's higher than you would like when it comes to remodeling and renovating your home.

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[00:01:04] Eric Goranson: the house. Welcome back to around the house with Eric G and Caroline B, where we talk home improvement every single week. Thanks for joining us today. We have a special guest back on Caroline. This is great. She's our

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[00:01:21] Marianne Metzger: it.

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[00:01:30] Marianne Metzger: Thank you guys so much for having me.

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[00:01:50] Marianne Metzger: Absolutely. Absolutely. There's so many contaminants that can be found in drinking water that don't really make themselves known in [00:02:00] obvious ways like taste and odor and, and that sort of thing. So it's like the unseen contaminants that you don't know about. Uh, That are really the ones that are more health related.

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[00:02:13] Caroline Blazovsky: PFOS is getting out of control. Cuz now everybody's calling up and asking for PFAS testing. Like that's the new thing. So I guess the word is out and, and just for our audience too. And for Eric, just explain how PFAS, how, what the actual name of P a S cuz we always call it this, this sort of shortened name and then there's all these different P a S PFAS.

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[00:02:47] Marianne Metzger: So like P O S is like, kind of the general term that is used to kind of describe these chemicals they're called like per, per or polyfluorinated, uh, alkaline [00:03:00] compounds. So it it's, it's kind of like an overall description. There's about three. Thousand, I believe chemicals that have been identified under, under, under this class of chemicals and like probably the most two popular ones would be, uh, the P F O a and the P F OS, which are actual specific, uh, chemical names for certain compounds and, and.

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[00:03:49] Marianne Metzger: So, so now that we know they're in drinking water, or now they're kind of saying, oh, well, how dangerous are these? Um, but here here's sort of the, the thing. Yeah. It's in [00:04:00] our drinking water. But it's also in our house, it's in the clothes that we wear. It's in cosmetics that we put on our face, it's in, um, dental floss that we use every day, hopefully.

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[00:04:35] Marianne Metzger: Wow.

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[00:04:51] Marianne Metzger: Yeah. So there's a couple of different ways to, uh, remove or reduce P a S and you know, we're, there's still a lot of, uh, [00:05:00] research going on about this, because like I mentioned, there's, you know, about 3000 of these compounds, we probably test, uh, laboratories can probably test accurately for maybe.

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[00:05:35] Marianne Metzger: Commonly as an eight chain, meaning that it has eight carbon chains in it. Um, those are removed easily using like, um, carbon systems. Um, certain ion exchange, uh, medias will help reduce and remove them. Reverse. Osmosis is also, uh, an approved technology for that as well. But, you know, as we look at more of these [00:06:00] compounds, um, we're starting to study like, you know, reduction rates.

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[00:06:26] Marianne Metzger: Um, so it, it, it's, it's very tricky and the, and the science is still out on a lot of it as well. Um, The EPA just recently, uh, came out with new health guidelines for P F O a and P F OS. They said initially 70 parts per trillion was okay. And now they came back with levels that, you know, virtually no laboratory can detect down to.

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[00:07:06] Caroline Blazovsky: question, no, I just had a client test there building, uh, a doctor and they came back at 27 parts per trillion.

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[00:07:19] Marianne Metzger: Absolutely. I mean, and, and here's also the other thing about P a S um, when you're testing for it too, like I mentioned, it's in so many other products, like you could actually be contributing to those test results depending on how you're collecting samples. So like that, that's crazy too, to think about.

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[00:08:02] Marianne Metzger: And, you know, you gotta take that into account. Like that's not technically, you know, what's interesting Maryanne

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[00:08:20] Caroline Blazovsky: Correct. Or could it be in the air in, in naturally occurring, fresh air? It.

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[00:08:46] Marianne Metzger: Yeah. , it's probably, you know, that you just treated with like water repellent the, the week before, like, or my brand new composite, he just

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[00:08:57] Marianne Metzger: PFAS. [00:09:00]

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[00:09:24] Eric Goranson: Let's get her on. I'm seeing a lot of different water filtration systems that are coming on the market now over the last number of years. And they're kind of an all in one solution that they're claiming to be. That they will deal with hard water without salt, that they've got a, you know, six stage filtration system that doesn't have.

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[00:10:07] Eric Goranson: I'm curious.

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[00:10:41] Marianne Metzger: Um, I tend to recommend people look for products that are certified, whether it's through, uh, the national sanitation foundation, NSF or the water quality association or IMO, which is a, a plumbing association. Those, those organizations [00:11:00] all test under the same protocol. And they're all like, you know, verifying that this filter does indeed, you know, remove lead or, or whatever it is that they're claiming to remove.

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[00:11:33] Marianne Metzger: I have seen like, uh, like anecdotal evidence that in fact, like there is some sort of reduction in scale. It's it's hard to test and prove that it actually does.

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[00:12:03] Eric Goranson: Yeah. But again, when I go onto people's websites and look at the different systems out there, It seems cool, but I don't see test results that go, oh, here is this.

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[00:12:33] Marianne Metzger: You know that it's changing the structure of the water molecule so that it will not like, and the hardness that's within the water so that it will not attach to the side of the piping or anything. So it won't form the scale. So, you know, what's interesting is, you know, I used to do some work, uh, at. At a previous position.

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[00:13:19] Marianne Metzger: So yeah. Okay. It's it's hard to measure that. Yeah. Yeah.

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[00:13:43] Eric Goranson: And I, it seemed like it was a similar kind of product. .

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[00:14:02] Marianne Metzger: Nope. Um, You know, so there, there is some truth to some of what they're saying. Okay. Um, but like I said, there's not, there's not a lot of testing protocols out there that can say, yes, this is working, you know? Okay. You can't can't prove it. And that's where in my mind, I mean, , I'm always like, Hmm. It's always based on the science.

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[00:14:24] Eric Goranson: That's where I become the, where I'm the skeptic going? All right. Show me, then they go well, and. Are you showing me? I'm not sure I can't see it. So that's where I struggle. That's

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[00:14:38] Caroline Blazovsky: Maryanne, and I will tell you too, where your products are manufactured or how they're manufactured is really key.

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[00:15:04] Caroline Blazovsky: And there were no guidelines for the washers or the products or the tubing that was used. And so you may be thinking you're doing something better for your health. And in, in turn, you're actually making the water worse, which we've.

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[00:15:19] Eric Goranson: So people that are out there that maybe have that KitchenAid or LG or Samsung refrigerator that has the water filtration system, if you go onto Amazon and go, wow, this filter is only like a 10th of the price of the one that has the name brand.

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[00:15:46] Marianne Metzger: Exactly exactly that. And that's a huge, huge problem on Amazon is, uh, these knockoff filters. Um, and they're coming from, you know, these countries where, you know, they're not as heavily regulated as we are here.[00:16:00]

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[00:16:21] Marianne Metzger: Right. Next thing, you know, you got arsenic poisoning. Speaking of arsenal, let's

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[00:16:43] Caroline Blazovsky: You don't wanna have it floating around. Right. But we do.

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[00:16:49] Eric Goranson: little bit. Yeah. We used to run into that a lot when I used to live in Tacoma, um, in the Tacoma area, Washington, uh, it was a town over from where I was living, but we [00:17:00] had for like 70 years, they used to make railroad ties in this arsenic plant right there.

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[00:17:30] Eric Goranson: They haul off everybody's soil and this was only 10 years ago, but that's how high the arsenic levels were. They were digging up the lawn at everybody's homes and replacing the grass in the soil and putting new soil in there and hauling that off to haz. just because of that. And that groundwater was never the same.

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[00:18:10] Marianne Metzger: Um, so a lot of states can have regulations that are much more strict than what the EPA says is allowable. So, I mean, the state of California comes to mind, New Jersey, uh, the state of New Jersey. Yep. New York, those, um, probably Massachusetts has some stricter guidelines as well. So like even though, um, EPA says like 10 parts per billion is good.

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[00:18:55] Marianne Metzger: So they know it's there. These states have now started to make their own [00:19:00] regulations. So when the EPA was saying 70 parts per trillion is okay, you know, Probably like over a dozen states came out and said, Nope, we're gonna say it's much said,

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[00:19:16] Marianne Metzger: Yeah.

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[00:19:32] Marianne Metzger: I think it's pretty much everywhere. I mean, it's, it's found in a lot of municipalities. Um, it's found in a lot of well water.

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[00:20:02] Marianne Metzger: What's in products that we use every day. So of course it's gonna, you know, find its way. Into our aquifers and you know, our lakes and, and everything like that. So I, I don't think that there, I don't think that there's not a place where you wouldn't be able to find this.

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[00:20:21] Eric Goranson: With what you

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[00:20:39] Caroline Blazovsky: So what do you do, do you call the state? Do you call the water board? What is your recommendation for that?

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[00:20:56] Marianne Metzger: If you're finding it in well, water. Yeah, I would let, I would let [00:21:00] the, uh, The health department and everybody know that it's there. I mean, will you be able to, you know, Get somebody to pay for your system based on that? No, I don't know. Uh, there, there are, there are some areas I know in New Jersey where, um, some of the polluters are being held accountable.

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[00:21:42] Caroline Blazovsky: Southern New Jersey or central, I would say central to south.

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[00:22:03] Marianne Metzger: Yeah. I mean, I, I would say definitely report it if, if they have not gotten some notification from the municipality that it's in there. Chances are they haven't tested for it. And I can't even imagine that in New Jersey, they haven't tested for it. Um, because it's all over in that state. welcome to Jersey I, I, I mean, right.

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[00:22:55] Marianne Metzger: So, you know, it could, it could take two years before they find the solution that they're [00:23:00] able to install and then also afford. And of course, you know, they're gonna pass some of that cost done to the, to the homeowner. Sure.

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[00:23:18] Eric Goranson: And they provide a water quality report that goes out to the public for, for people that are on the water system, but there's no PFAS or anything on that water quality test that they're doing that they're sending out to us at least. So they do not even address it. And I'm like, Hmm. I'm gonna have to ask a few more questions now, aren't I, because it's not on.

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[00:24:00] Marianne Metzger: So, yep.

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[00:24:06] Marianne Metzger: So they're like head in the sand. We don't test for it. We don't know what's there. I , you know, but at least they

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[00:24:21] Caroline Blazovsky: We don't have that in New Jersey or New York, Oregon, Connecticut. And the list goes

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[00:24:49] Eric Goranson: And it's a $5,000 fine. They don't mess around.

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[00:24:56] Eric Goranson: Uh, I see that they have a new thing here addressing PFOS and [00:25:00] Oregon. Yeah. The, the EPA is 70 parts per trillion and that's what they're trying to, uh, make sure everybody's drinking water is better than that is what they're saying, but we'll see what

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[00:25:10] Marianne Metzger: Uh, they just changed that level. Like within the last, I wanna say last month. Wow. They changed it down to like the super low detection levels. Exactly. So. Yeah, so many parts per trillion, old news now.

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[00:25:25] Marianne Metzger: yeah. Little little behind the times, little

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[00:25:30] Eric Goranson: Little question for Marion.

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[00:25:45] Marianne Metzger: there?

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[00:26:07] Marianne Metzger: Um, because they give up to like 15 parts per billion for lead, uh, in order to meet that like, uh, Lead and copper rule and the, like the requirements and everything. And they just changed a lot of this. So people think that it's okay to drink 15 parks per billion of lead. And that's not, it's not good. It's not so, so like, um, you know, a lot of times municipalities will, or like labs will, will mark on their report.

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[00:27:02] Marianne Metzger: They're just not happening to test that particular home or, you know, there's, there's a lot of ways they get around that, I think. Um, but I'd have to say lead's probably one of my pet peeves to see in municipal water. And how about softeners?

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[00:27:20] Caroline Blazovsky: And I say, because a lot of people really don't have that high mineral content where they're actually putting it on and trying to soften it. They just put it on as a gimmick, right. They go to a local box store. The box store says, oh, your water, quality's poor, put a softener on. And then the softener ends up softening those pipes that contributes to the lead and copper issue.

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[00:27:42] Marianne Metzger: Well, I, I full disclosure, I work for a resin manufacturer, which, uh, manufacturers, can I in resin that goes into these softeners? Yeah. Um, so full disclosure there, but I. I feel like, um, there is a point at which hardness [00:28:00] minerals can become a problem in a home where they build up in your hot water tank.

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[00:28:28] Marianne Metzger: Um, you know, if it's, if it's, to me, if it's above a hundred parts per million, then you should consider a softener and you'd have, you know, you'd have a reduction of that. Um, not, not so much that it would soften the pipes, but you know, you'd have less, uh, scale buildup on those types of appliances. Yeah.

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[00:29:07] Marianne Metzger: You know what? You can drink that all day long. It's not gonna hurt you. Um, but hard water with our SNIC, you know, you don't wanna be drinking that. Yeah. So I think a lot of guys, especially in, and this are taking a look at like the, the whole water as a whole. What else is in the water besides hardness? So, yeah, so they can make the right recommendation.

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[00:29:27] Eric Goranson: as an interior designer of 30 years, I have recommended. Treating that water when it gets hard like that, where you're starting to get the build up on the inside of the appliances, you know, I've had clients put in a brand new shower system and they spent $10,000 in a shower, but refused to treat the water.

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[00:30:09] Marianne Metzger: right. Right. And same thing, same thing with the, uh, you know, the dishwasher and the washing machine and think of your hot water tank. And a lot of people don't like, uh, um, like drain their hot water tank enough so that they're flushing those hard minerals out. You know? So most people

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[00:30:34] Eric Goranson: So they don't hurt it. They'll go to open the drain in the bottom. And the water won't come out, cuz there's so much sediment build up in the bottom of that. I have gone into help change out friends' water heaters that had died at five years in and it was half full of sediment. So that 50 gallon tank only had 20 gallons of water in one element working because the sediment had built up so much inside of it.

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[00:31:01] Marianne Metzger: Yep. Yeah, definitely, uh, a little crazy on that hard water scale. And, and like I said, not everybody knows to do that. Yeah. You know, to, to drain that out on a, on an annual basis. Not every couple years. Yeah. see.

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[00:31:26] Eric Goranson: On our soft, you know, we've got soft water naturally coming outta that. Yep. The thing I'm worried about though is it's coming out of a mountain lake and, you know, Oregon has wildfires. There's plenty of PFAS that is used. Yep. In when they're out there dropping the water from the airplanes during fire season.

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[00:32:00] Eric Goranson: That's right next to the lake. Right. So you gotta be careful,

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[00:32:11] Eric Goranson: one of the problems we've had down here. Um, and this happened a few years ago and I. I had people on the radio show, making fun of me cause I have my killer water filter and people go, oh, you'll never need that. We got plenty of water around here. Well, it was, this was in Salem, Oregon, south of me. That was probably four or five years ago.

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[00:32:53] Caroline Blazovsky: things perdium in, there's what it was.

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[00:32:55] Eric Goranson: that out west. Yeah. Is that what it was? Yeah, I think that's what it was, but [00:33:00] anyway, wow. They, they couldn't get on it. Their system couldn't deal with it. So it was coming from the source. And so they basically had to wait for whatever happened in the lake. They were pulling out for that to go away cuz they didn't have a way to treat it in their.

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[00:33:28] Eric Goranson: I'm happy. I wasn't me, but I was just, you know, it's half hour, 45 minutes south of me, but I had friends that were like, Hey, can we come take a shower at your house, man, come on over.

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[00:33:39] Caroline Blazovsky: remember when that happened, cuz my friend was out in Portland and she was saying that was like a big issue.

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[00:33:57] Eric Goranson: So you're almost better to be on a well at [00:34:00] that point in that area because it was coming from a different water source.

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[00:34:05] Eric Goranson: So, what do you recommend Marianne for people that have Wells? You know, there, we there's so many, you know, people around the country that are like Caroline you're on a well, right.

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[00:34:17] Marianne Metzger: I always have. So I, I mean, obviously I am the testing girl. Yeah. Um, that's where my whole background has come from. Um, I, I'm a firm believer in test your water on a regular basis. If you have your own, well, you're not paying for your water. So you've got to pay to be your own water treatment plant.

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[00:35:06] Marianne Metzger: What kind of results you've had in the past. Um, but once you know what your problems are in the water, then you can address them. I mean, there's all kinds of th whether it's a water softener, a carbon filter, um, you know, something to address specifically arsenic, um, You know, there's, there are definitely treatment options out there for just about anything.

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[00:35:48] Eric Goranson: Cool. Okay. I got a question that is probably the most controversial water. In the world fluoride in the drinking water.

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[00:36:03] Eric Goranson: this is how we make yeah. Everyone mad in our listening audience all at once.

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[00:36:19] Marianne Metzger: Um, they're not, they should not be adding it in an amount to where, you know, it would cause significant damage, but here's the thing. Um, the way that they add it, they have a hard time controlling the levels. So you could, you could end up with a slug of fluoride in the water that's higher than you would like.

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[00:36:48] Eric Goranson: Yeah. It's a great toothpaste that you can control how much you put in your body. Right?

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[00:37:02] Marianne Metzger: Exactly. Um, so

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[00:37:23] Eric Goranson: Is there still, can you filter that out pretty easily? If you wanted to put a filtration system in your home, if they are providing that.

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[00:37:47] Marianne Metzger: Uh, fluoride, I feel like that's probably one of the best options out there for reduction. Um, so yeah, there's options. If you have it in your water, you can reduce it and remove it. Cool. [00:38:00] Okay. And then R RO will also take it out. Reverse osmosis pretty much takes everything out. So , yeah,

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[00:38:07] Eric Goranson: And, and I wanna get you both of your guys' take on RO. I think if you got really low quality water coming, an RO might be a great option, but I don't like the taste or lack of, I don't like the minerals. It takes out what's your guys' take on.

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[00:38:31] Marianne Metzger: So a lot of, a lot of these guys out there are now finding like, okay, yeah, we're using reverse osmosis to remove some of these dangerous things like arsenic or fluoride, or what have you. But we do like a little bit of calcium and potassium in our water. Cause you know, there is a, there is a little bit of taste difference.

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[00:39:07] Caroline Blazovsky: The, the other issue too is whole house system versus under the sink Mount. And so when we're talking about certain chemicals, our body, our skin, we often forget is our largest bodily organ. And so when you go in to take a shower, you may say, and this is like the quote from every client I've ever had. I don't drink my water.

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[00:39:41] Caroline Blazovsky: I had a client who she was showering and she was getting really high levels of radar on coming out of the shower, head. And so what was interesting yeah. Is she had these very peculiar symptoms and nobody could trace it to anything. And then she ended up being one of my clients. And when I tested her rate on, I uncovered it and I think [00:40:00] I did it with you Maryanne.

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[00:40:17] Caroline Blazovsky: Oh, for sure.

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[00:40:32] Marianne Metzger: Right. Mm-hmm it's about, well, I mean, just think about it. When you take, take a hot shower, all the pores in your skin open up, and you can absorb those chemicals or whatever it is directly into your body.

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[00:40:45] Marianne Metzger: All right. That sounds the thick one. I saw a study.

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[00:41:00] Caroline Blazovsky: And it's, I guess, a filtration mechanism to get rid of them when you drink it versus through your skin. Have you ever heard anything?

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[00:41:24] Marianne Metzger: Personally don't believe that for a minute. Um, like I said, I mean, you take a hot shower. You, your POS open up mm-hmm where else is this stuff gonna go? um, is it, you know, is it, is it as bad as directly ingesting it? I don't, I don't know the answer. And, and unfortunately there's not a lot of answers cuz this isn't studied data, data.

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[00:41:46] Eric Goranson: So I got a question, like for instance, um, you know, I don't drink a lot of bottled water cuz we've got really great tasting water around here. So, and my day to day thing, I'm not blasting bottled water all the time. I have my stainless steel containers I drink out of and, [00:42:00] and keep 'em clean.

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[00:42:24] Eric Goranson: What is that? Are we tasting minerals or what's typically the issue with stuff like that where you. Fairly low quality tasting water versus testing.

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[00:42:44] Marianne Metzger: There there's a lot of got that sulf taste. So yeah, a lot of it, a lot of it is mineral content. Um, and then of course you add on the chlorine, um, especially in areas where it's that warm year round mm-hmm Vegas, Florida, you [00:43:00] know, they're adding lots of chlorine. And then just think about that, that chlorine's reacting with the whatever else is in the water.

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[00:43:06] Eric Goranson: gotcha. So it's reacting to the minerals. It's reacting to yeah, the metals, all the different stuff. It's it's doing its own little. Tear apart, everything trick. Yep.

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[00:43:36] Marianne Metzger: Yeah, I drink a lot of bottled water when I'm on the road.

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[00:44:01] Marianne Metzger: so a lot of those actually do exactly what they say they do. So like pure Brita, um, there's zero water technologies out there. Mm-hmm those, those guys have all gone through extensive testing. I believe all of those products are NSF listed. Okay. So, so they've been tested. To, to whatever claims that they're making.

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[00:44:48] Marianne Metzger: Filter gonna perform properly. Probably not. No. Um, so there are limitations depending on what the water quality is going in.

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[00:45:10] Eric Goranson: You might overwhelm that system.

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[00:45:23] Eric Goranson: and I, I was on a, well, one time in a farm community, it was out in the middle of nowhere, you know, 25 minutes outside the Metro area where I was living and we would see our water quality tests come back.

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[00:45:51] Eric Goranson: It was fascinating to see just how the weather would change depending on when we took those well sample. .

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[00:46:14] Marianne Metzger: So yeah, it definitely will impact what your water quality is. And even with municipal

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[00:46:33] Marianne Metzger: just FYI.

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[00:47:02] Marianne Metzger: So, you know, that's, that's part of the reason that they, they regulate those disinfection byproducts on a, like a annual basis. That makes

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[00:47:24] Eric Goranson: What are you seeing with technology over the last few?

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[00:47:53] Marianne Metzger: So like your carbon filters, reverse osmosis eye in exchange. I mean, those are your, [00:48:00] your big ones. Uh, To rely on. I mean, there's been some improvements, but I mean, technology's pretty much the same. Cool,

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[00:48:18] Caroline Blazovsky: I, I see occasionally a friend of mine that we worked with, um, We went to high school together. He is big into water treatment out at UCLA as a professor. And I see they're always constantly doing, I think Kevin Costner was behind his company trying to, I guess, clean water, right. From whether it be oil, oil spills, or using, I guess, salt water to be able to use it as drinking water.

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[00:48:45] Marianne Metzger: Well, I mean, the technology is like reverse osmosis basically is what they're using for desalinate. Decemination right. Um, yep. Yep. Membrane technology. So, I mean, it, it's, it's pretty common. Um, especially [00:49:00] like if you go down to the Caribbean, um, my favorite place to go is Aruba.

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[00:49:25] Eric Goranson: The problem that you see though, is, is it it's fairly expensive to operate, right?

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[00:49:46] Marianne Metzger: yeah, 100%. And that's like, like some of the things that I would talk to, like the, the people of Aruba, like my taxi cab driver, who would be like, yeah, but the, the cost of water out here is ridiculous.

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[00:50:06] Eric Goranson: It's hardly too expensive to live there anyway. right.

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[00:50:14] Eric Goranson: know, I, I tell you what I say that, and I joke about it, but then I've got our friends, like David Applebaum that, uh, architect of the stars that would like to be no other place.

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[00:50:36] Marianne Metzger: I mean, it's nice. And I like to visit, but not for me to live there for sure. Yeah.

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[00:50:52] Marianne Metzger: Oh yeah. I got a couple coming up this summer. I can't

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[00:51:14] Eric Goranson: And, uh, to date myself there and when they were the opening act and, uh, right. And you weren't able to go, it sounds like.

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[00:51:38] Marianne Metzger: And you know, we sat around talking about what song would be playing right now if you were there.

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[00:52:07] Eric Goranson: It was a hundred degrees outside. So they had the fire department there with a ladder truck spring. Yep. Water over the top of people, cuz it was just packed with fire hoses to keep us.

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[00:52:26] Marianne Metzger: And like people were just dropping like flies cuz it was so hot out. Um, yeah. And they had the fire department there as well. You know, this was, uh, I think down in, uh, Akron rubber bowl. Okay. Is where they had it. On this in the Midwest. Nice back in the day.

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[00:52:51] Eric Goranson: So it was, it was a lot of fun, but woo, great show. You're gonna see a good show with them. I can't wait to catch them the next time around. I've caught 'em a few times and, uh, they never [00:53:00] disappoint.

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[00:53:09] Marianne Metzger: So, I mean, I am pumped and ready to go and, and I do ha I do have to drive all the way to Pittsburgh to go see them. So. Okay.

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[00:53:23] Marianne Metzger: yeah. I, I have seen some good ones out there, so nice. But yeah, Metallica not coming close enough to Cleveland.

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[00:53:33] Eric Goranson: So why not? Well,

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[00:53:36] Caroline Blazovsky: Why, why

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[00:53:42] Caroline Blazovsky: music. I'm gonna, yeah, I'm gonna go bopping back to water for a second. We have this massive issue in our reservoir reservoirs here, um, with.

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[00:54:11] Caroline Blazovsky: I mean, know, we've obviously been seeing a lot.

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[00:54:35] Marianne Metzger: Got into the water and, um, it's, you know, exposed to toxic chemicals. And unfortunately like either they died or they got really sick mm-hmm um, so, so yeah, LG blooms are happening a lot because of runoff into the lakes. Um, we see this here in Cleveland and, and more so to the west of us, like out near Toledo, because there's a lot more farmlands out there.

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[00:55:21] Caroline Blazovsky: sick or what are the symptoms, if you are exposed?

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[00:55:46] Eric Goranson: to watch out

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[00:55:47] Caroline Blazovsky: You have that Eric out where you are in

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[00:56:02] Eric Goranson: So it's something you gotta be really, really careful of. And we'll have one or two lakes every single year. It's gone on that way for a while here because our winters are very wet. And our summers are really dry. So we don't get much rain between, you know, mid, early to mid-June at the latest 4th of July.

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[00:56:43] Caroline Blazovsky: And that's important, cuz if you're camping or you're going out for the summer, cause all of our listeners do right. You take a trip, you get in your RV, you get in your car, you go out and you just pick a, oh look, this is a beautiful lake. I'm gonna take a dip and here you go. Cause you, you know, how can you really keep track of it?

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[00:57:05] Marianne Metzger: problem. . Yeah. Yeah, it's crazy. I, I think they do probably put signs up mm-hmm in certain areas where they see where it's real prevalent, but yeah, I'm very weary about, you know, swimming in unknown waters.

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[00:57:23] Eric Goranson: yeah. Our lakes are pretty well tested for that. I mean, if it's a little pond someplace, that's off the side of the road, that might not be it. So you gotta be careful. Generally are they'll, you'll see the caution tape across the parking lot and that kind of stuff where they're like, you're, you're, it's pretty obvious you're going into a place you're not supposed to be going to

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[00:57:50] Marianne Metzger: Gosh, I think we've, we've covered so much today. Um, I it's a lot, like I said, I kind of think, I mean, it's important to test and then figure out, [00:58:00] you know, what it is that you need and then, you know, apply the appropriate treatment.

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[00:58:30] Marianne Metzger: So you. At some point in time, I feel like, you know, every household is gonna have some sort of water treatment device and, you know, that's the way it should be. Perfect.

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[00:58:50] Eric Goranson: Number one, this last week. Oh, no, they were on stranger things. Yeah. So all of a sudden master of puppets, which came out when I was in middle school is now [00:59:00] number one on the rock charts. And I'm like funny how TV can get us old school rock back up in the charts.

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[00:59:11] Eric Goranson: Me too. Oh, absolutely. Master. We'll get outta here. I'm Eric G and I'm Caroline B and you've been listening to around the house