A Cleaning Revolution with Todd Hodrinsky
Episode 5826th October 2022 • Construction Disruption • Isaiah Industries
00:00:00 00:33:51

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Todd Hodrinsky, a prodigious inventor, introduces his recent creation, TiCoat. TiCoat is a titanium dioxide coating applied with a spray gun to most surfaces. It not only cleans interior and exterior surfaces but deodorizes too. TiCoat has already seen applications in restrooms, restaurants, hotels, and schools. By constantly cleaning, it streamlines routine cleaning, saving money and time.

 

Todd discusses the technology behind TiCoat’s remarkable performance, several stories of its transformative cleaning power, and the history behind this unique product. He also hints at the future of TiCoat, including integration with solar panels for boosted efficiency.

 

To learn more, visit ticoat.com or reach out on Facebook.

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Transcripts

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

One of the things that our product does in breaking down organic compounds, it basically uses light oxygen water when a carbon-based material comes into contact with it. It breaks it down into carbon dioxide and oxygen. It's one of the byproducts. So when you spray it on a latex paint surface, we immediately eliminate the VOCs and the SVOCs and we don't generate any when you're applying our product to the surface.

Todd Miller:

:

Welcome to the Construction Disruption podcast, where we uncover the future of building and remodeling. I'm Todd Miller of Isaiah Industries, manufacturer of specialty metal roofing and other building materials. And today my co-host is Ryan Bell. Ryan, welcome. How you doing?

Ryan Bell:

:

I'm doing great, Todd, how are you?

Todd Miller:

:

I'm doing very well also. So I hear you may have a couple of stories for me or things to illuminate me on.

Ryan Bell:

:

Dad jokes, I have a few dad jokes again that I will share.

Todd Miller:

:

That's close enough.

Ryan Bell:

:

Alright. How do celebrities stay cool?

Todd Miller:

:

How do celebrities stay cool? Well, I don't want to ruin this, but I'm guessing it may have something to do with all their fans.

Ryan Bell:

:

Oh, yes.

Ryan Bell:

:

They have a lot of fans.

Todd Miller:

:

I'm sorry.

Ryan Bell:

:

Little easy. Well, that's all right, that's good that you got that. Have we said that one before?

Todd Miller:

:

I don't think so. But you can tell I'm a dad.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah. Alright, I have one more. What do you get when you cross a fish with an elephant?

Todd Miller:

:

I think I've heard this one before, actually. I don't know. What do you get when you cross a fish with an elephant?

Ryan Bell:

:

Swimming trunks.

Todd Miller:

:

Good deal. No, I hadn't heard that before. Hey, thank you. I wanted to mention one thing. So we have talked before on this show about Magic Mind, which is sort of an all natural energy shot. And I tried one again today. I mean, I've used it before. And this afternoon I was just really tired. As you know, this is the third episode we have recorded today. And so I needed something to give me a little pick up. And I have to say it really did just in a very short period of time, no real no ill effects from it. It's interesting tasting stuff. I know, Ryan, you said you liked the taste of it, right?

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah. Oh, yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

I don't find it bad at all. It's a little bit of a different taste. It's green and it kind of tastes green a little bit, I guess if you were to put a label on it.

Ryan Bell:

:

It's organic-tasting for sure.

Todd Miller:

:

Yes. But it's good stuff. And so I encourage folks, check it out. You can go to magicmind.co, C-O, /disruption in order to learn about the product. And if you choose to buy some, you can put in a code of DISRUPTION20, all caps on disruption. DISRUPTION20 and I believe that gets you 20% off on a one-time order and 40% off if you do a subscription order of some sort. So again, magicmind.co/disruption and then DISRUPTION20 is your code, but it's good stuff. I recommend it, I'm feeling good. So are we ready to drive forward, Ryan?

Ryan Bell:

:

Yes. Let's get this underway.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, very good. Our spotlighted guest today is Todd Hodrinsky of TiCoat Incorporated based in North Windham, Connecticut. Todd holds whole bunches of patents and he has considerable history in product development. But his current business TiCoat emerged out of COVID with a product that is going to greatly impact, I believe, how we build and maintain our structures in the future. That product is a titanium dioxide photocatalyst coating that makes surfaces naturally easy to clean and disinfect with water and makes them also naturally deodorizing as well. Todd, welcome to Construction Disruption. It's a pleasure to have you on the show.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Thanks for having me, guys.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, thank you again. So before we get into the revolutionary technology of TiCoat, can you share with us a little bit about your history with various innovative and patented technologies? As I look at your history and your background, you've touched a lot of industries over the years. I just would love to have a summary of the journey you've taken to get you where you are today.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

So I was one of those kids that, when I was young, they didn't diagnos us with ADHD, but I was one of the hyperactive kids that wouldn't sit still in my seat, didn't do so well in college. It was an engineering program and ended up falling out of school and really got involved with innovation through robotics program. My father was a teacher, engineering teacher and I was given an opportunity to work as a salesperson for a robotics company up in Boston. And I had an opportunity to be involved with a lot of manufacturing processes throughout my career and became a consummate expert and then began getting involved with startups. That was sort of where I got interested in people like our company here at TiCoat getting off the ground. And how do you make them better, make products cheaper, how do you be competitive globally? And so that's what I do now. And I've got, I think, almost 20 patents at this point. Electrical, mechanical, I've got patents on lightning technologies. We have a company that I'm on the board of directors for down in Virginia that is a electrolytic free LED light that lasts 450,000 hours if you never turned it off. And when COVID hit, we got impacted pretty severely. Nobody was installing lights and my business partner in Belgium introduced me to the core technology, which is what we built off of that was in Japan. That's where this started.

Todd Miller:

:

So that's how this sort of came out of COVID then, was basically one business just wasn't happening because of COVID and lack of construction and things going on. And so someone brought you a new one. So tell us a little bit more about that. I mean, so you had a business partner bring you this technology and I understand it had some originations in Japan and you guys made it better. What did you think of it originally? I mean, how was it described to you and what were your initial thoughts?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

You know, initially it was two years before COVID hit. My business partner in Belgium, also an engineer, his name is Marcel. Marcel had a tile in his backyard that had growth, algae growth coming back all the time they were struggling with. And he went to Japan and looked at the technology and he sprayed this tile in his backyard over a period of a couple of years, nothing regrew on the surface. Nothing could stick to it. So I said when COVID hit, I called them. I wasn't really that interested in it leading into COVID, but I said, Is this something that has the potential to have an impact on interior spaces? Which he responded, It's really an exterior application technology. It's designed to work with light, with UV, with sunlight. So I put a team together and started to analyze, is there a way we might be able to make this work under lights? Which is what I and my other company was at the time. Could we marry the two technologies together? Be something that have the potential to work on things like SARs COVID 19, and those kinds of things? And the answer was yes. But today we're primarily focusing on cleaning services and the deodorization applications with the technology, and it's functional now in all of visible light, which is pretty exciting.

Todd Miller:

:

Very interesting. So one thing you said there, I have to give a shout out and this is completely non sequitur, said your business partners name was Marcel, right? So I immediately thought of, anyone familiar with Marcel the Shell with Shoes on. It's a cartoon character. Or not really cartoon animated character. Anyway, I love Marcel the Shell with Shoes on, so I've never met your business partner, but I like the guy already just because of his name. So one thing since I already have us down a rabbit trail, I did forget to mention earlier one of the things that we do here on Construction Disruption is, we each have challenge words. So we have each been given a word that we're going to try to work into our conversation at some point today. And then at the end of the show will then we'll divulge whether we've been successful or not. So if you hear someone say a word that sounds a little weird, just kind of think, huh, I wonder if that was their challenge word and we'll let you know eventually. So tell us a little bit more about TiCoat. What are some of the uses for this technology that you're seeing emerging? And, you know, I kind of get the sense from talking with you before that we're just kind of hitting the tip of the iceberg in terms of how this product will be able to be used. But tell us some of the potential uses that you're seeing for it.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Yeah, it's pretty broad. And it's one of those technologies that sounds like the the used car salesman or the snake oil salesman that does a lot. And every day that I come in the office, I hear more from the field as we start to push this technology into the market here in the U.S., uses for self-cleaning buildings, exterior applications, deodorization is one of the big ones and so is anti-slip. We're working with water parks now that apply our product on flooring surfaces, and it makes it so that the the flooring is less slippery. But the deodorizing is the eye-opener because when you spray it on a surface, it can be applied to everything. Fabrics, textiles, hard, it's indiscriminate what you can spray our product to. And the big thing is you can't see it, so you can smell it. So we've done a lot of applications. We did a very significant project here in Connecticut, heavily vetted by the state of Connecticut at the time to make sure it's safe for kids, K-12 schools, it applied very quickly. We did a 400,000 square foot surface area project with an elementary and middle school. And the aha moment was when we sprayed the urinals and the areas where there were a lot of odors. That was done in February, and they've eliminated all the toxic cleaners in the building. They literally used water and soft cloths to clean all the surfaces and no odors have returned in any of those bathrooms. So Patti Buell, who's the superintendent of schools, very adamant about the safety and efficacy of our product in schools, which is really, really safe for kids. And we educate people about these toxic cleaners that we've all been using. You pull a bottle out and nobody uses them properly and they don't realize that it's been additive, you know, that you're spraying down surfaces continually and trying to keep things clean and you end up with toxins that get transmitted from the surface to us, which our product does not do.

Todd Miller:

:

Very interesting. I love the school story and just to kind of reiterate that. So you went in and sprayed all the interior surfaces and now it's very easy for them to clean just with soap and water and not having to use a lot of caustic, dangerous chemicals and all that. Is that correct?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

It is, yeah. And then we are a very veteran-oriented company, so we trained about 80 vets over a one-day period and one of the best, spilled a little extra material on the floor. And one of the custodians, who was not a big fan of our product initially, actually, he was worried that we were going to replace his cleaning routines. And that's not what our product does. It just makes cleaning easier and keeps things clean in between the time that you do your normal procedural cleanings. And he called me and he said, someone spilled some of that. We can't get it off of the floor burnisher. So they've been testing it as a floor wax replacement, faster to install, more durable. And it also is anti-slip, which is an added benefit that they didn't expect. So it was, that was one of those aha moments of the technology when you're thinking we didn't spray any of the floors and now they're being trained up to apply it as a repeat material on the flooring systems in the schools.

Todd Miller:

:

Very interesting. So your story of the urinals reminded me, this is kind of a disgusting story, but it reminded me of something. So I have an uncle, his name is Lou. We always call him Uncle Louie because he's so screwy and he's a little bit of a funny guy. But anyway, he was a school administrator all of his career and he told a story of an elementary school where they were getting this urine smell in the boys restroom. And they eventually figured out that there was a boy who was peeing into the radiator, which, of course, then when the heat came on that sent that smell every place. So they ended up calling this kid as they tried to catch who he was, they referred to him as the Mad Urinator. Or I just keep thinking with TiCoat, they never would have even known they had a Mad Urinator probably, so.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Yeah, it's funny, you know, we did a recent project. What we usually do to, we tell people our installers will do a free bathrooms for our customer to let them know. So we got a college dive bar, if you can imagine what that smelled like. This was like a 40-year-old bar that probably hadn't been touched in that period of time. And when we go in there and the bar owner said, My favorite saying of all time was, It's not what I smell. It's what I don't smell. And I couldn't script that any better. And so I wrote it down. I said, Please, can we use that in our marketing materials? He said, Absolutely.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, I'm kind of curious, looking out to the future of TiCoat as you continue to develop, but are you seeing it being used largely as a retrofit used on products that are already out in the field, whatever that product might be? Or are you seeing it more as being something that could be applied to a surface right at the factory in order to enhance the performance of that product in the field?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

It's a combination of both. I mean, if we had Disneyland, it would be applied to every surface and everything that we have. In my office here, everything's been treated with it, the panel behind me, the television monitor, all of it. But when you control it in a factory environment, you get a better overall result because it's more consistent than someone holding a you know, we apply it with a standard automotive paintgun that we've developed for applying our product with an air compressor. Very easy to get people up to speed on doing. It works really well in those environments, but if you control it and heat it, it starts out like a clear coat on a car. But it is even more durable when you put it into a manufacturing process where you can heat it for a period of time to get it more durable on the surface. So OEM is absolutely the best application for our product, but it works. You know, general use like we did with the schools and some of these other projects, things are really starting to take off quickly for us.

Todd Miller:

:

Gotcha. And of course, the way you and I got to meet each other was really talking about, you know, would this have roofing applications in terms of keeping roofing naturally cleaner? But also slip resistance is great on metal roofing, too, and that's been a factor over the years as how do we make metal roofs more slip-resistant? So very excited about some of the trials and things that we've been working on together and anxious to see where those go. I know that you had shared with me once before about the incredible amount of interest that you're getting in TiCoat right now and demands for people wanting to use it and try it and learn more about it. Kind of curious, what are some of the lessons you think you're learning from leading a fast growth organization like that? I mean, how do you how do you keep that all under control when you got that kind of growth going on?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Yeah, it is a challenge. And, you know, it's one of those technologies we're trying to control the growth by only allowing it to be installed by professional installation teams. So they have to go through a certification process to learn about how to apply TiCoat. We don't just sell it on the residential. You're not going to see it on Home Depot's shelves any time soon. This is a professional-grade product that is only available through professional agents. So that helps us. And then we're able to kind of weed out good and bad. We can sort of closely monitor the performance of the teams and if they're having trouble, you know, not applying it properly, if you don't atomize it correctly, you end up with poor results. We want to make sure that they get the right training. So we spend a lot of time doing that field right now, a lot of hands-on, a lot of slow controlled growth, and that's difficult to do. But once we get the baseline, the foundation built out with all the tools, it'll be very easy to springboard our company.

Todd Miller:

:

So describe the product a tiny bit for us. I mean, you mentioned that it helps with slip resistance. And again, yeah, that's something that really appeals to me in roofing. I mean, I want roofs that people can dance around on like ninjas and do it safely and be able to get around on a roof. But does it have a tactile feel to it once it's applied, or help our listeners kind of understand that?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

So when you put things like water on our surface, one it's not a sealant. It's actually, if you look at it, at UConn we did electron microscope analysis of the technology that we were developing and it looks like a matrix. So it's flexible. I can spray my shirt with it, it'll flex and move with the shirt, very thin material. But overall, the way that the performance of the technology works, it's anodized titanium dioxide and it's been out for many, many years. As an example of this, if you go to a museum, the reason they used to tell you not to take pictures is because the white pigment was titanium dioxide that made it white. So when you would hit it with the camera, it would make it photoreactive and it could fall off the surface. So there was no way to really attach those particles so that they would stay on the surface. It's been out for many, many years that this technology could do this. But my team worked on a two-part system that makes it bind to the surface so that it doesn't fall off as it does what it does. And then we have a 100% titanium dioxide surface finish with the top coat. So it's a two-part system in the field, a little bit of work to get it prepped. You prep the surface, you apply the base coat. That creates an anchor point for the material to attach itself to the surface. So it's very unique. Very, very unique.

Todd Miller:

:

What are some of the uses? And you had mentioned that this technology had originated in Japan. What are common uses for it there? I'm just curious.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

So because their original technology was UV-activated, it was primarily used for exterior applications and the only interior applications they could do was with fluorescent lighting. You know, LED lights don't generate any UV light whatsoever. That black light that you get at a bar, that purple light, that's what activated titanium dioxide. And what we were successful in doing is binding metal oxide with the titanium particles to pump it into the visible light range, which means it's now full spectrum, visible light. So ours is still peak efficiency on exterior applications. Like, you know, you were talking about roofing panels, they're exposed to sunlight all day long. So that's the highest photo reactivity. But we're still functional within a building. All these new buildings are all been upgraded to LED lights, and that was the hurdle I had with my other lighting technology. It took a little while. I couldn't sell it as a complete system with our lighting system attached to a surface to make sure they were married and certified together. That was the goal originally.

Todd Miller:

:

So a lot of our audience members, we think, are younger folks in design and construction. Any thoughts on how they might be impacted by TiCoat in the future or ways that you would advise them? Hey, here's something to be thinking about for your future career or any ways that even they should connect with you now and look at embedding themselves into this technology?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

You know, it's a low-cost barrier of entry to get involved with our product. The spray gun that we developed, $250, you need a standard air compressor, which most contractors have that do pneumatic spraying systems or even pneumatic guns. And you're basically in the business of applying the coating. It is really profitable and very affordable. We typically see prices range from $0.60 a square foot to a dollar per square foot, depending on the complexity of the job. And the profit is very good. Most of our installers are making anywhere between $50 and $150 an hour on jobs, depending on what they're doing, so very profitable. But here's the interesting thing. We talk about odors. One thing we break down are VOCs and SVOCs. So you talk about we just recently got the highest grade gold standard for a clean air certification. One of the things that we learned at the school, we got feedback from the teachers that said it's easier to breathe in the school. And one of the things that our product does in breaking down organic compounds using, it basically uses light oxygen water. When a carbon-based material comes in contact with it, it breaks it down into carbon dioxide and oxygen. It's one of the byproducts. So when you spray it on a latex paint surface, we immediately eliminate the VOCs and SVOCs and we don't generate any when you're applying our product to the surface. On top of that, we're a net zero waste facility. And so what that means is our waste product is a sellable product in the pharmaceutical industry, very desirable. It's called ammonia chloride salts. It's used in candy and pharmaceuticals today, and we flush it down the drain. But over time, as we build up our production facility here, we'll start selling that as a waste product. So we end up with no waste whatsoever. And you know, you're in manufacturing, right? Having zero net waste is a huge thing. It does not happen.

Todd Miller:

:

I remember you were telling me a story of a, I believe it was a hotel room that had just been kind of trashed. And, you know, they wanted to go in and get this thing so it could be rentable again and didn't have smells and things. Can you tell us a little bit about that story and how that worked out with your product?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Yeah, yeah. That's the funny one, right. So we tell our installers, you got to give a little to receive, right? So we tell them when they get some doubters to say, Give me a smelly bathroom. So this manager at a Holiday Inn up in Boston said, I got one better for you. We had a customer that was living in a room for six months with a dog. The dog was defecating, urinating on the floor for that period of time on the carpet. And then he was smoking marijuana in the room, which creates a really odorous residue on the walls. So they were getting ready to gut the room, pull the carpet out. And he said, let's see what you can do with your product. So our technician went in there and he applied our product on everything, including carpets. Now imagine if we're not in contact with the surface we end up with underneath the carpet. We can't really do much there. But the interesting thing of that project was our our primer base coat materials actually an oxidizing cleaner on its own. So I told them, mix it into your floor extractor, one of those steam cleaners and put it into the floor. He said, Look, I got rid of about 90% of it by spraying. And then once you put that in the floor extractor, he said, I got rid of about 98%, but there was still a little odor. So I said, Let it sit for a little bit. He came back the next day. All of the urea was yellow powder on top of the carpet. They vacuum the floor and rented the facility the next day. That was a shocker for me.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah that's an incredible story that has to make you feel good as an innovator to have something that, Gee whiz, I'm still learning about what all this product could do as well.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Yeah, and you start thinking in terms of how do you spin these things out because it's too expensive really to put in the floor extractor. But can we create some other maybe diluted form of it that would be affordable to stick in a device like that? You wouldn't do that normally, but that was just a good test of our product.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah. Well I love the idea that, like you said, the cost of entry is so low. So, you know, someone out there is is interested in doing this. I'm sure you would help teach them how to do some marketing and go out and start generating some leads and working with different facilities and organizations and schools and so forth and making some things happen. So that's a cool entrepreneurial opportunity I think, for folks as well.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

I agree. Absolutely.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, we're getting close to the end of our time. This has been a real pleasure, a lot of fun. Is there anything that we haven't covered today about you or TiCoat or anything that you'd like to share with our audience?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Yeah. You know, it's we believe, or I should say I believe as a leader of our company, kind of invert our business strategy. A lot of big corporations, the leader being me as the CEO of the company, kind of looks at the people below them as employees. I actually invert the pyramid so that I work for the customers, I work for everybody below me, including our installers. And that's been our focus is to make sure that our installers are really happy, because we need that, right? But we also have to build a sales organization to generate opportunities for them because we find a lot of these installers, you know, they stick a magnet on the side of their truck, but they're not marketers and they need people to support them in that. So we build the whole infrastructure, and continuing to build the infrastructure to really drive business to them. Find opportunities with trained professional salespeople that would bring them an opportunity as opposed to the other way around, bringing them to us and then servicing your customers. You know, the bar and restaurant industry, bad smells and toxic cleaners. You know, I was at the restaurant in town the other day and a girl came out with a bottle. She's spraying a table, there's no label on it. And I said, I have to ask, what is that? She went in the back, she picked up the bottle, it was ammonia and she wasn't doing it correctly. And I was eating off of that table. So when we apply us in those applications, we become a toxic, cleaner-free facility. That's one of the pitches that we have for the restaurant/hospitality industry. You know, that's you want to smell the good smells of those casseroles and not the bad stuff. So, you know, that's really what we do.

Todd Miller:

:

Absolutely. And I like that, and I see, you know, first of all, you came out of COVID to some degree as far as this technology. But I also see how the ramifications of COVID are going to drive this forward, because you're absolutely right. I mean, you know, when I first started returning to restaurants after the lockdowns and things and seeing all these chemicals being sprayed on my table and, you know, who knows what they had to beef up in terms of, you know, cleaning plates and silverware and things. And yeah, so it's definitely some things to think about here that may make life safer and better for all of us going forward. So good stuff for sure.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

You know, one last thing before we go. Even with Patti, with the schools, that was the aha moment. They had four chemicals that they used that were Green Seal certified, which when they heard the word Green Seal, they assumed it meant safe. We pulled the bottles and pulled the safety data sheets and had them read the labels. Every single one of them said harmful to people and animals. And when they saw that, that was the aha moment, you know, that just said we got to come up with a better solution of this.

Todd Miller:

:

Wow. Even though they were Green Seal products. That's amazing.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

It was a shocker for me. I wasn't in the chemical space. So when I started reading, I didn't expect to see that, I did not.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, this has been very informative. Thank you so much for your time. I do have to ask you before we close out, we do something on a lot of episodes here that we call rapid-fire questions, and these are seven questions that we ask our guest. They may range from serious to silly. All you got to do is give a quick, short answer. And our audience needs to understand if Tod agrees to this, he doesn't have a clue what we're going to ask him. So I have to ask, are you up to the challenge of rapid-fire?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Let it fly.

Todd Miller:

:

Great. Well, I can start us off here, Ryan, if that's okay, and I'll ask the first question.

Ryan Bell:

:

Sounds good.

Todd Miller:

:

So you have worked with a lot of products and patents, you said like 15 and some patents. Other than TiCoat, can you tell us one of your favorite products that you have worked with over the years?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

I would say it was working on solar photovoltaics with Vision Systems, inspecting them at a almost at a molecular level. I enjoyed that a lot.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, and I kind of wanted to bring out here, you know, and I hope I'm not spilling the beans here, if I am we can edit this out. But you had shared with me that your folks are also looking at how you could potentially spray solar panels with TiCoat in order to keep them cleaner and keep dirt to come off every time it rains, basically, which of course would enhance the performance of them. So I thought that was a really, really cool application of your product as well.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Yeah. Self-cleaning solar panels, that's us.

Todd Miller:

:

Cool. Okay, question number two Ryan.

Ryan Bell:

:

Top or bottom half of the bagel?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

You got to eat the top of the bagel. Come on. That's where everything is, it's all the good stuff.

Ryan Bell:

:

I agree.

Todd Miller:

:

I agree. Not everyone feels that way, though. So at the end of your time here on Earth, what would you most like to be remembered for?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Disruptive technology development.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, cool. I love that. Well, you're doing it, you're well on your way.

Ryan Bell:

:

I was going to say, sounds like you're on the right path for that. What's your favorite pizza topping?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

I got to tell you, I like eggplant pizzas.

Todd Miller:

:

Really? I don't think I've ever had that. That's cool. So you put other toppings on there with eggplant, I assume.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Of course, a little pepperoni and eggplant, absolutely.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, my goodness, I got to check that out sometime. Okay, for some reason, I must have been thinking dinner when I wrote these questions. We got another food one. Not really food. If you had to eat a crayon, what color would you choose?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Yeah, it'd have to be the black one. I mean, they're like chocolate.

Todd Miller:

:

They're like what?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Like chocolate? Like, I remember as a kid, I always thought it was chocolate. Didn't look like it.

Todd Miller:

:

My dad used to have a story when he was a kid. He got into the cornstarch thinking it was confectioner's sugar. He was in for a quick surprise on that one, I'll tell you.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Oh, my God. That's a sticky situation.

Ryan Bell:

:

Next question. What was your first car?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

My first car was a Honda Prelude.

Todd Miller:

:

I don't think they make the Prelude anymore, do they?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Nope, It was a fun car to drive when you were 16.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah, good stuff. Okay, final question. What is your bucket list vacation? Where would you love to go someday?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

My wife is pushing me and I'm leaning on this, is Italy. We both have family there. I've never been. Been flown over many times, but never stopped.

Todd Miller:

:

Wow. I hope that happens soon. Well, this has been great. I do need to let our audience know that, congratulations, guys. We were all successful on our challenge words. That's pretty awesome. Ryan, your word was?

Ryan Bell:

:

Elephant.

Todd Miller:

:

And you worked that in.

Ryan Bell:

:

Snuck it in right away.

Todd Miller:

:

Pretty early, as I recall, you didn't mess around. Got it right there in the dad joke. And, Todd, your word was?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Casserole. You guys teed me up for that with the restaurant.

Todd Miller:

:

I kept thinking to myself, Oh, how's he going to figure this one out? And mine was ninja. I missed my first opportunity. I should have said that the Mad Urinator was like some sort of ninja. So I missed my first opportunity, but figured out a second one then. Well, this has been great, real pleasure to learn about TiCoat and meet you and learn about you as well. If folks want to get in touch with you and also if they want to simply learn more about TiCoat, how can they best do that?

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

We're on Facebook and at TiCoat.com. Obviously, you can see on my shirt, T-I-C-O-A-T.com. Contact us at TiCoat.com. We can take care of you.

Todd Miller:

:

Very good. Well, this has been great. Thank you again for being with us today. We appreciate it and enjoyed it a great deal.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Thanks, Ryan and Todd. I appreciate you having me on today.

Todd Hodrinsky:

:

Todd Miller: And I want to thank our audience for tuning in to this episode of Construction Disruption with Todd Hodrinsky of TiCoat Incorporated, T-I-C-O-A-T. Do encourage you, please watch for future episodes of our podcast. We always have great guests; we're very blessed in that way. Don't forget to leave a review on Apple Podcasts or YouTube. Till the next time though, change the world for someone, make them smile, encourage them. These are very powerful things that you can do to change the world one person at a time. God bless, take care. This is Isaiah Industries signing off until the next episode of Construction Disruption.