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The Amazing Power Of Demartini Method - The Demartini Show
Episode 4328th August 2020 • The Demartini Show • Dr John Demartini
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Discover a revolutionary new approach to transcendent and transformative psychology. What if there is an actual hidden order in the world, that few individuals have ever become aware of? What if there is a magnificence unseen that few have ever had the opportunity to discover, but those that did, the rest of their lives were transformed and empowered? Dr John Demartini has developed such a method of inquiry and awareness which has been called The Demartini Method. It may now be your time to discover the amazing power of The Demartini Method, a 14-step process that will reveal to you the hidden order and higher perfection of your experiences in life, yourself and all the individuals and events around you. You can now discover an order that can bring inspiring tears of gratitude to your daily experience.

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Transcripts

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[Inaudible] Good morning.

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Afternoon and evening for everybody who is online today with me.

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Thank you for joining me. For those of you who don't know me,

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I'm Dr. John Demartini and I'm going to share

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the amazing power of the method that I've developed over the years.

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I'm going to start off by saying that when I was 18 years old and I

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was learning how to read, because I had learning problems as a child,

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my uncle sent me a giant couple crates of books to

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my home. And two of the books that were sent,

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one was by the Nobel prize winner, Paul Dirac,

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and it was on particle physics.

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He was the one who founded the idea of particles and antiparticles being

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balanced initially in the universe.

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And then there was also one by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz or Leibniz, who

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wrote a book called the Discourse on Metaphysics.

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And when I read the Discourse on Metaphysics, he said

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first paragraph, that there was a perfection in the universe,

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a magnificence in the universe that few people ever get to know,

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but those that do their lives are changed and transformed forever,

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for the rest of their life. When I read that,

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somehow it brought a tear to my eye.

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I'm sure you've had a moment when you've read something or heard something or

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viewed something that brought a tear of inspiration to you.

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I couldn't quite put my finger on or grasp what it was,

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but I just knew that I knew that there was something there that I wanted to go

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and explore. And I've used since I was 18,

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that tear of inspiration as a guidance to kind of navigate through

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life of what I want to study and learn and what I was going to do,

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because it gave me an insight about when I'm authentic. When I'm authentic,

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I get that tear of inspiration as a confirmation.

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And when I'm pursuing something that's clear and I'm trying to put a puzzle of

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life together, that's a very powerful, useful tool.

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After reading that, I went on a pursuit to try to find this quote "perfection",

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this divine perfection as he called it,

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he was a mathematician and philosopher and theologian.

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When I read Paul Dirac's book on particle physics,

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and I saw that there's for every particle, there was an anti particle,

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and that if you join them together, a particle and anti particle,

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a positron and electron, or any particle and anti particle,

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you birth light. And in my naivety at the time, I thought, wow,

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if particle and anti particle, complementary opposites

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because one's a thesis, one's an antithesis,

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if they could be synthesized synchronously and birth light,

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I wonder what would happen if I was to put the positive and negative experiences

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of our life and emotions in our life, happy, sad, kind, cruel,

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all pairs of opposites, if they were to be synthesized synchronously,

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could I birth enlightenment?

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And could I discover the hidden order in the apparent chaos?

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I went on a pursuit and I started studying physics and

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chemistry and mathematics and psychology and brain research.

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And it took me to every ology that you could study.

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And I found common threads to these different disciplines.

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Will Durant said that there was a dialectic sitting in every field.

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And I found that to be true.

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A dialectic means a thesis and antithesis synthesis,

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opinions and opposite opinions joined together to make more objective truth.

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I started to pursue psychology, brain research, and

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as I went along,

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I started to realize that every time we perceive something and judge something

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as positive or negative, they were always birthed out of contrast.

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Wundt, W U N D T who was a psychologist at the time, way back, William

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James, over 100 and something years, 125 years ago,

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said that there was a study of psychology that led to the realization that there

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was always opposition and synchronicities of opposites,

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he called it the law of contrast.

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And Heraclitus in the fifth century

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BC mentioned the same thing and many people,

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many philosophers through the ages mentioned this. And this stuck in my mind,

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because it seemed to show up in chemistry, in physics,

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in math and everything else I found,

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trying to balance the equation in mathematics, balance

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balance the nuclear physics, balance everything,

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I thought somehow there's an inherent objective balancing

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mechanism going on in the brain. The research was pointing to it. Contrast with

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sensory systems.

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I realized that when I was thrown off from being centered in life,

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and I was infatuated with something,

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I was conscious of the upsides and unconscious of the downsides.

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And when I was resentful to something, I was conscious of the downsides,

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unconscious of the upsides. But when I saw both sides simultaneously,

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I was neither up nor down, I was centered.

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And I was neither shamed when I was infatuated with others or proud when I

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was resenting others, I was authentic. And I thought, okay,

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this is the first principle that I want to incorporate into what I'm going to

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call the Demartini Method. Originally, it was called the Retro Genesis Process,

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later it was called the Collapse Process based on quantum physics and collapsing

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the wave function by Schrödinger. Then it was called the collapse,

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I guess they call it the Demartini Collapse Process.

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Eventually I realized that that was confusing people,

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and I just turned it to The Demartini Method,

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everybody just started calling it that anyway.

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And so I started to put two principles together.

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I realized in myself that whenever I was judging somebody and

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criticizing somebody, looking down on somebody, if I was really honest,

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I found out that the thing I was judging them for was something I was actually

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feeling ashamed about.

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And I was judging and pointing my finger out at them and actually three of them

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were pointing back at me. You know, it's the old problem that,

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pluck the mote out of your own eye before you pluck it out of somebody else's

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and look inside yourself before you look at others that way.

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And I decided to go to the dictionary, the Oxford dictionary,

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which is the biggest dictionary I could find at the time,

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the smallest little prints, thinnest little paper,

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most comprehensive dictionary.

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And I went through every human behavioral trait that I could find

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that a human being could display.

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And I circled each behavior as I went down the page,

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this is a long project here.

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And as I came across the word that described a trait that I would

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consider a human behavior, some action or inaction or trait or behavior,

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I then thought of who is it that I know that displays that trait to the most

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extreme example. And I put their initials out there.

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And then I thought to myself, kind of where, and when do I display that?

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And I looked inside my life and really reflected cause reflective awareness,

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which is self-inspection,

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introspection is one of the greatest awareness we have,

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it's what distinguishes us from the animals in a sense,

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there is a non-reflective consciousness and,

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non reflective consciousness is observant of the world around you,

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like an animal can see the environment,

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but he can't see itself look at the environment,

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but self-reflective awareness is being able to look at yourself in the

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environment, looking at the environment.

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And I looked at myself and I realized that the individuals that I had imagined

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being the most extreme example, I looked for where and when I displayed that,

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and it was not hard to see, I,

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I realized that I actually did and did display those same behaviors.

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And I went through, believe it or not 4,628 traits.

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And I discovered I had them all. I was nice at times. I was mean at times,

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I was kind at times, I was cruel at times, I was considerate, inconsiderate,

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thoughtful, thoughtless, peaceful, wrathful, nice, mean, kind, cruel,

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considerate, inconsiderate. I was honest, dishonest.

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I was putting on with pride and arrogance and then shame and humbleness.

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And I went through and I found out that I did every one of them at different

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moments in my life, if I was really honest and I didn't want to be honest,

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I wanted to put on the proud face and pretend like I had gotten rid of some,

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I actually was bought into at that early stage, that self-improvement,

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that I was going to get rid of half of myself and get only one sidedness.

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It wasn't until age 30 that I finally realized that was futile.

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I realized that everything that I thought I'd gotten rid of,

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I realized I still surfaced and I was repressing it, and then it would explode.

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When I finally realized, I realized it's better to just own the traits.

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It's interesting how we want to be loved for who we are,

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and yet we're trying to get rid of half of ourselves and we want to love other

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people, but we want to get rid of half of them.

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And we want to love the world and want to get rid of half of it.

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And that's just absolute idiocy when you think about it,

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you're not going to do it. And I found out that I never got rid of a trait.

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I never really gained a trait cause I traced those traits all the way back to my

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childhood and I continued to have them.

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And I realized that these biological traits,

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these behaviors were absolutely essential and there was a biologic reason for

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them. I realized that I needed kind and cruel at different signs because when my

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values, my hierarchy of values were supported, I was nice, a pussycat.

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When my values were challenged, I was cruel.

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And I needed both of those because life has both support and challenge.

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Maximum growth and development occurs at the border of support and challenge.

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Ordering and chaos,

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living at the edge of chaos is one of the principles in evolutionary biology.

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When I finally realized that I put together the very

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first phase of the Demartini Method.

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That was where you make a list of every trait action or inaction that

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you can admire or despise about somebody.

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And you make sure that that list is balanced,

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because our first assumption is that there's way more negatives than positives,

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or way more positives than negatives or whatever, resentful, or infatuated,

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but this is holding you accountable.

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Accountable is able to bring a balance sheet to your mind and being accountable

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to see that balance.

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So I made myself look at where the individual that I'm

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disliking for instance,

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and I'd rattled off all the negatives about them that I dislike,

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I gotta go find as many positives of that. And when I looked, I found them,

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I had just chosen not to look.

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I had a subjective bias as a survival mechanism to keep me from looking for the

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both sides.

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And I wanted to label the person and archetype them instead of embrace them

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as one and had all the traits in life.

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And when I went and made myself accountable to write

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the negatives that make sure that those numbers were balanced,

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and if I saw way more negatives, I got to go look deeper, I found them,

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I found that they were both sides.

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And then I found out that not only do I have them,

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but so do the people around me.

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And then I went and I looked at where and when I displayed and demonstrated

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those behaviors. Now, initially it was kind of cursory.

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I just looked at where did I do it and I wasn't really precise. And I just know,

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yeah, I've done it. But I, I now know,

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go to exactly where it was and when it was.

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I now ask the individual in the Demartini Method,

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go to a moment where and when you perceive this individual, pardon me, yourself,

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display or demonstrate the same or similar behavioral trait, action,

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inaction that you despise, or like admire most.

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And go in there and identify where it is, when it is,

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to who it is and who's perceiving you do that.

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And that gets an episodic moment out of your brain and locks in a neuro

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associative complex, neurologically, which is essential to transform the brain.

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And I made myself accountable to find what I saw in other people.

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And the reason why I resented them is because it was reminding me of something I

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had done in the past that I felt guilty about.

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And I didn't want to deal with that and I didn't like being around them because

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they reminded me of me that I was judging.

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And sometimes I was too proud to admit what I saw in them,

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inside me and I wanted to avoid them and label them and

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bias my perception of them instead of look at the balance of them and see them

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as an individual, I'd put a persona,

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mask on them about who they are instead of embrace them as a whole human being.

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And when I was admiring somebody,

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I was too humble to admit what I saw in them was inside me, but I had it.

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And that was very powerful cause then I realized that whatever I admired in

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them, in any human being, a great hero or a great villain,

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that I'm too proud to admit, by God, I've got all that in me.

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At the level of my soul, nothing's missing in me, cause I'm not judging.

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The soul is a state of unconditional love. At the level of our senses,

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things appear to be missing because we're too proud or too humble to admit what

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we see in others inside ourselves, and those disowned parts,

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those too proud or too humbled personas that we have and the projected

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personas we project onto people are not really truths.

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They're just our biases and those biases weigh us down gravitationally,

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keeps us in bondage.

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Because anything we infatuate and resent occupy space and time in our mind and

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run us, irrespective of time or space, we could be run by our emotions 20, 30,

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40 years later, cause we never resolved them, never balanced them.

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And I realized that as long as I'm infatuated,

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cause I've had infatuation I couldn't sleep at night,

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it was preoccupying my mind. Being resentful, where I

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preoccupying my mind.

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Only when I centered myself and brought myself into perfect balance,

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synchronously,

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that I was able to rest and actually get centered and I required less sleep when

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I found that, mastered that.

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So I first made a list of all the specific trait, actions,

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inactions that this individual displayed or demonstrated that I admired or

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despised most.

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Then I looked at where and when did I display and demonstrate the specific

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trait, action,

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inaction in my own life and I'd level the playing field and realize I was no

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longer too proud or too humble to admit what I see in them inside me.

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And that was with the first level of reflective awareness. And then I realized,

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that as I honored myself,

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how are you going to be loved for who you are if you keep exaggerating and

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minimizing yourself and you don't even allow yourself to be yourself.

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I found when I was myself, I was grateful. I was inspired. I was loving.

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I was present. I was certain, I had inspiration,

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and those were confirmations of being authentic.

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But as long as I was looking down on somebody or looking up at somebody,

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I wasn't being me. So that was the first two steps of the Demartini Method.

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Then I realized that the trait, action,

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inaction that I initially admired or despised that I thought had

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upsides without downsides or downsides without upsides,

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where I split my consciousness into conscious and unconscious halves,

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the thing that I thought was up, had downsides and the

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had upsides. I realized, and I watched that in my clients,

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if somebody would come to me and say, 'Well,

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my father was really cruel to me and mean to me.' And then I found out that they

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became entrepreneurs, capable of being independent, resilient,

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and adaptable and driven. And I found out the other person said, 'Well,

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my mother was very nice to me,

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never cruel to me.' And then I realized that you became dependent and then you

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expected everybody to be like your mother.

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And then you became juvenile and you couldn't even ask questions to yourself,

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you had to offload the responsibilities onto mommy and you never grew up,

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and I've seen men stay with their mommies when they're 50 years old.

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And I realized that nice is actually mean and the mean has actual nice.

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And I realized that those were illusions that people were having.

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And then I also realized the things that we think are terrible a day, a week,

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a month, a year or five years later,

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we realized that there's some terrific hidden in that, and we look back and go,

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thank you, that, I didn't see it. But I,

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I now have the wisdom of the ages because of the aging process, but I can,

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if I do the Demartini Method, have the wisdom of the ages without it,

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don't have to wait 20 years to find out that the thing is a blessing.

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Find the blessing by looking. The quality of your life is based on

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the questions you ask,

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the Demartini Method is a series of questions that

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make you aware of the unconscious part.

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So your unconscious is always trying to reveal to you the side you're ignoring,

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your intuition is trying to do that.

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So if you're infatuated with somebody your intuition is trying to point out the

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downsides, the part you're unconscious of.

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And when you're resentful to somebody it's trying to find out the meaning,

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the upsides, so you're fully conscious and the part you're unconscious of.

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And so I realized that when I look carefully and ask questions,

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so go to a moment where and when you perceive this individual displaying or

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demonstrating a specific trait, action, inaction that you admire or despise,

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and what's the downsides of the thing they admire and what's the upsides of

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that, and made you accountable, hold yourself accountable to see both sides.

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The moment you do, they don't run you.

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Instead of being extrinsically driven as a victim of history,

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you now become a master of destiny and realize you have control over your

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perceptions, decisions, and actions.

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And that's very profound when you finally be accountable and be objective.

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Objective means neutral in that respect and balanced and extracting meaning out

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of the thing is finding the mean, the balance between the polarities.

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And so your life has meaning every time you do that.

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So I realized that this thing that I thought was terrible in them,

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that I resented, wasn't.

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The thing that I thought was so terrific that I was admiring, wasn't.

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It was just an incomplete awareness.

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And when I actually realized that nobody's worth putting in pits,

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nobody's worth putting on pedestals,

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but everybody's worth putting in hearts and have reflective awareness where I'm

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not too proud or too humble to admit what I see, and I see both sides of it,

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and I'm balancing the equation.

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In the first phase of the method I'm balancing the equation between self and

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other, the second I'm balancing the idea of positive and negative,

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in self and other.

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And then I'm balancing out the polarities of charged polarity.

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It's called charged parity law in conservation law in physics.

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And then I realized, you know, instead of me just judging them,

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the real truth is I,

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I watched the situation of my resentment to somebody one time,

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then I looked inside myself where I'd done it.

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And once I found the benefits where I had done it to whoever I had done the same

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behavior to, I found myself not resentful to the individual. I realized that,

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gosh, my resentment to myself,

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my shame is actually causing me to resent somebody else that's reminding me of

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it. And I want to avoid them.

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And I realized that our impulses for pleasure and our

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amygdala is skewing our reality and not allowing us to appreciate what's

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actually there. And there's something magnificent there,

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there's a hidden order there,

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there's a love there that Leibniz was trying to say.

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So I needed Paul Dirac's particle and anti particle physics and mathematics to

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help put this model together. But I needed Leibniz to guide the path,

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the dharmic path as the Buddha says, towards something that had deep meaning.

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As Victor Frankel says in the concentration camps he found meaning,

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when every body else was dying, he survived.

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He thrived instead of just survival.

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Then I started to go in there and identify wherever I had done the behavior,

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look back of where and when I did it and looked how it served or disserved,

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if I was infatuated with myself and proud, I looked at what was the downside.

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So I calmed down my pride because if I don't calm myself down and don't have

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self-governance on my own pride, I attract physiological,

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psychological sociological or theological events to humble me,

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pride before the fall.

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And if I don't do the opposite when I'm shamed and look at the upsides of it,

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I get again, physiological, psychological things lift me up.

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Nature's always trying to equilibrate,

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Saint Augustin mentioned that in his theology,

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the will of God is equilibrium when the will of man matches the will of God or

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will of man and woman, humans, match the will of God, is graced,

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his life is graced, grateful. So I started going there and look at where,

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and when I did it and helping my clients do that.

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And then I realized that they were carrying around shame and guilt and pride,

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and those are all personas. They're not real.

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They're exaggerations or minimizations of who we are.

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And the magnificence who we are as a total is far greater than any

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fantasies or nightmares we'll put on ourselves.

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So as I started to neutralize it,

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I noticed that as I knocked out all my shames of all my guilts that I was

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resenting in other people reminding me of,

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I noticed my self worth went up and I was willing to hold onto money,

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hold on to, have fair exchange and not give away stuff and I also noticed,

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I was now willing to actually start having money work for me instead of me

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always working for it and buying things to feel better about myself.

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So that was a major breakthrough when I finally realized that self-governance is

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what my executive center in the brain is trying to do,

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is trying to mitigate the impulses and instincts of the subjective biases and is

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trying to wake me up to the magnificence and the hidden order in my life.

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Because all these things that I'm doing and they're doing,

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no matter what I've done, or no matter what they've done, we're worthy of love,

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and that's very powerful when you finally get that.

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That's what the Demartini Method's about,

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to help you realize there's something magnificent in your life and you don't

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need fixing. You don't need self-improvement. You don't need it.

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You just need to wake up because you only think you make a mistake when you

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compare your actions to somebody outside that you've given power to,

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whose values that you've injected.

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And you only think other people make mistake when you

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them and expected them to live in your values, they can't live in your values,

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they live in their own. You can't live in other people's values,

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you live in your own. Then I realized another thing,

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I realized over time, that I heard a lot of people label people.

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My mother was always mean, never nice.

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And I noticed cancer patients had black and white,

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all or none labels and language. I noticed that all the way back when I was 24,

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when I was working as the president of the Cancer Prevention Control Association

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in Houston, and I was going, wow,

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the most primitive physiology,

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the most extremophilic state of brain and cellular physiology,

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is an absolute extremes. And so I thought, well, that's a subjective bias.

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When an animal is out in the wild it's camouflaging itself from others,

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and it's being camouflaged by its prey and predator. And in order to survive,

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it has to have false positives, exaggerate it in order to get the adrenaline up,

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strong enough to chase the prey and to avoid the predator.

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So I realized that whenever I hear people say all or nones,

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I know they're under high survival mode.

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And they're really literally polarizing their view to all the way to infinity

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over one and one over infinity, all or none. And I realized that's not,

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that's not,

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there's no phenomenological world that you can existentially touch that's

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infinity. So when I hear that, I knew that's a lie.

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So I started to ask the question, where is the other side?

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Because if somebody is not always nice, I've gone up to people and said,

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'Would you consider yourself always nice never mean, always kind never cruel,

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always positive never negative, always peaceful, never wrathful?' And they go,

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'No.' They can't have certainty about that, cause it's bullshit. And I say,

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'You're always mean, never nice. Always cruel, never kind, always wrathful,

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never peaceful?' 'No.' 'If I said to you sometimes you're nice,

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sometimes you're mean, sometimes you're kind, sometimes you're cruel,

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sometimes you're positive, sometimes negative, sometimes you're peaceful,

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sometimes wrathful, would you believe me?' And they go, 'Yeah.' I say, well,

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you only have certainty about yourself when you realize the two sides,

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the balance of those, objectively, not subjective biases that are survival,

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but objective thrivals.

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So I basically went in there and I realized and started going and asking the

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question,

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go to a moment where and when you perceive this individual displaying or

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demonstrating the specific trait, action,

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inaction that you admired or despise most. Okay there.

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Now who are they demonstrating it to? Okay to you,

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they're cruel to you or you know, critical of you or something. Okay.

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Now go to a moment where and when you perceived the same individual displaying

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or demonstrating the exact opposite behavior to you, praising you.

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And if they're critical about the way you're managing money,

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where are they praising you about managing money?

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I made people accountable to look at examples in their

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and pretend it didn't exist and made them accountable to look,

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and they discovered that the individual that they had labeled as always

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something, always positive, always negative or whatever, weren't.

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There were times when they were supportive and times when they were challenging,

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and times when they were kind and times when they were cruel,

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when you did things that supported their values, they were kind,

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when you did things that challenged their values they were cruel.

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And I'm that way, and you're that way, and we are that way as a human being.

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We have a set of values, if we get supported, we can be pussycats.

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If we get challenged strong enough, we can be tigers.

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We are not one sided individuals. We're not personas, masks,

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facades. We're a whole being. And I want to be loved for a whole being.

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I don't want to be loved for only one side because I can't sustain it,

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so I'm going to be sitting in bipolar states.

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And bipolar condition's a byproduct of monopolar addiction,

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the addiction to one sidedness and our society and all your life,

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your grandmother probably said, be nice, don't be mean, be kind, don't be cruel,

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and then she'd beat the hell out of grandpa and was a hypocritic. So you're,

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you're told one thing that people live another,

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and I'm not interested in these moral hypocrisies,

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I'm interested in human behavior and how to master your freaking life.

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And I'm not interested in all that. I found that as Dirac said,

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back when I was 18, he says, it's not that we don't know so much.

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It's we know so much that it isn't so. We're taught the opium of the masses,

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the fantasies that make us easily controlled and governed into a

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self depreciative state, striving for an unattainable goal. The Buddha says,

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the desire for that which is unobtainable and the desire to avoid that which is

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unavoidable is a source of human suffering.

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And so we've been told that all our life,

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but I'm not interested in the fantasies of traditions and conventions.

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I'm interested in how human behavior works.

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I spent 47 freaking years working on that. And I'm absolutely certain,

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you're an objective being with both sides. And it's a waste of time. And I mean,

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a freaking waste of time to try to get rid of half of yourself. And I,

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and I have to pound that into people's head in my Breakthrough Experience

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because people are addicted to fantasies and then they make nightmares out of

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their life trying to be something they can't,

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expecting others to be something they can't, expecting others to be one sided,

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not going to happen.

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When you finally embrace both sides and see that the individual's got both sides

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and balance the equation, the labels go away.

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And then you understand the individual and you want to know them about their

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values, because if you know what their values are,

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you can know what to expect from people.

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Otherwise you're going to feel betrayed, and they don't betray you,

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you do with unrealistic expectations of one sidedness,

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expecting them to live in your values, not their own, expecting to be one,

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one sided creatures, which isn't going to happen.

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Not in a world that requires support and challenge for maximum growth,

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not going to occur. Then I realized something 20 years ago,

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something pretty profound.

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One of the most profound realizations of my life when I was studying cell

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physiology, I started studying redox reactions.

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And I noticed that for every oxidation,

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which is a loss of electrons to some atom molecule or ion there's a gain

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of an electron somewhere else, which is a reduction. And one is an oxidation.

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One's a reduction. And redoxes occur simultaneous,

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they're entangled like particle and antiparticles,

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and a light bulb went onto me.

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And I realized that this is oxidative phosphorylation is one of the mechanisms

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of energy in the body and life itself depends on it.

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An excited atom has to go back to a ground state to give us energy.

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And I realized that's what photons in the world,

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that's what the sun is doing for us,

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for cyanobacteria and up the food chain all the way to the alpha predator.

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And I realized that wow,

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I latched onto an insight and I realized,

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and I started for the next couple of years,

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I went on a research on myself again,

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and I looked and all of a sudden two things had popped;

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something I wrote when I was 24 in my 'Illusional Basis of Man's Health and

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Disease' text on how perceptions are dealing with contrast,

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Wundt's idea in psychology that I read at 22, 23,

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and all of a sudden this light bulb just went on. I'm like, Oh,

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I can't believe I missed this.

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And I started to realize something that in Neuron Magazine in 2016,

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another discoverer found out about it.

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This is 16 years later after I'd found it,

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found out that there's memories and anti memories and that there's electronic

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and molecular chemical balancing going on in the brain,

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even though the pharmaceutical industries have sold you a bill of goods and it's

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a biochemical imbalance, the freaking truth is that's not fact.

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And it's not a causal relationship to depression in psychiatry like they want to

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sell you. You have perceptions, you can change your chemistry in seconds,

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in billisecond,

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you can change your chemistry by changing your perceptions and attitudes of

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mind. This is what William James was trying to say. And Wundt.

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So I basically discovered something. I realized that if I go to a moment where,

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and when I perceive an individual displaying or

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trait action, inaction, some specific traits that I despise or admire,

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and I get where it is, when it is,

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and I get really present with it because I realized that the conscious and

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unconscious mind splits at the moment of perception.

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And if I get really present in that moment,

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at that exact moment and find out where it was, when it was,

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that I perceived it, and what is the content of my perception?

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What am I judging? And what's the context, what's it about?

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So they may be criticizing me about my management of money,

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how I spend money or manage money. And in that moment,

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if I look carefully at what they're doing,

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and I look for the reflective opposite, the complimentary opposite,

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the exact opposite behavior at that moment, lo and behold,

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my mind has the answer to who is doing the opposite to me,

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it was a mind blowing realization.

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I call it the Great Discovery because it's the greatest discovery ever made in

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psychology. And I realized that it's either in reality or virtual reality,

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it's one or many, male and female, closer or distant, virtual or real.

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And if it's done to you, it's somebody other than you.

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If it's done to somebody other, it could be you.

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That means that whatever's going on in your life, there's a pair of opposites.

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So if somebody is criticizing you, there's somebody praising you,

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but you're unaware of it. When you're conscious of the criticism,

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you're hurt and you feel angry. If you're conscious of the praise,

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you're pleased and you feel pleased. But if you see both of them together side,

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you realize that you're actually being given a moment of love.

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Love is a synthesis and synchronicity of complementary opposites.

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When you realize that that's all that goes on, 24 hours a day.

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We have what is called a stream of consciousness as William James says,

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and moment by moment, sliver by sliver, every billionth of a second or whatever,

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a trillionth of a second, there's a sliver of conscious freezing you might say,

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and we snapshot our reality and we gather information and we create what is

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called a neuro associative complex in the brain from sensory input.

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We then associate it with previous experiences that

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you might call it a memory or a moment of perception.

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And in that moment, whatever the content of that perception is,

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the brain in order to neutralize the chemistry is because of the excitation of

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neurons. It has to balance it,

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the chemistry or otherwise it gets a runaway noise in

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of what they call brain noise.

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What happens is the brain creates a composite opposite

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opposite. And when I finally realized that,

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and I looked at that and I asked where it was for two years, I did it on myself.

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And I did hundreds and hundreds of cases,

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thousands of cases of moments in my life,

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where I saw what was going on and where in my mind.

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And when I did cases in rape and beatings and torture and things of that nature,

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when I had clients that had gone through really quote, "traumatic experiences",

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I found out that they dissociated and created a composite opposite in their

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brain to counterbalance the chemistry in the brain in order to maintain

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homeostasis. And so they were dissociating,

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while they're being beaten for instance,

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they would go and imagine themselves invincible, when they were in darkness,

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they'd see light, they'd feel like they're, they're constrained,

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they'd see freedom and act like a bird or a butterfly or fly or something.

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And I watched these dissociative states,

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the content of the dissociated state was counterbalancing the state that they

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were experiencing in their so called trauma.

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I also noticed in ecstatic drug use,

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the ecstatic would create paranoias of the opposite.

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And I realized that the mind is always maintaining pairs of opposites.

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When I discovered that and proved that, thousands of cases in my own life,

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and then clinically working with clients,

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I discovered what I think is one of the greatest discoveries of human

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psychology. And we live in a zoology of psychologies, it's a zoo,

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perpetrator, innocent victim model.

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And so we are separating causalities and blaming other people and no therapy

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will ever be complete till cause equals effect in space time.

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And so what happens is I went in there and I went in and identified exactly

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where it was when it was, what it was, content context, who it was to,

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and I looked for the other side and I found it every time.

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I found it was either real or virtual,

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but I found that it was complimentary opposites. And man,

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I got tears of gratitude and I saw the same thing I got when I got with Leibniz

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when I was 18 and I just went wow, this,

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this is too profound not to share. It's just too profound.

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And then I started clinically working with people with my method

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more and more.

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And I put it into the Breakthrough Experience where I begin to teach people

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this. And the Breakthrough Experience I've done 1,107 times,

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to try to get this message out to people because people are caught in this

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fantasy and opium of quote "self-improvement" and get

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try to be one sided in this moral constrained hypocrisy that we live in.

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And we subject ourselves to traditions and conventions that are antiquated,

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and aren't really human behavior at its highest, highest and finest.

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And when I finally put that into place and put that in the Breakthrough

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Experience, I watched transformations in people's lives.

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I saw people see things they never saw before and all of a sudden,

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when they saw the pairs of opposites, their heart opened,

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and I realized that love is truly a synthesis and synchronicity of any

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complimentary opposites. So whatever you perceive, the opposite's there,

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and when you're doing something to somebody,

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I looked again and when you were mean to somebody who was nice,

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when you were nice, who was mean,

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when you're rejecting somebody who is wanting them,

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when you're stealing something who was being generous, when you were generous,

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who was being stealing?

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I blew people's minds by making them aware and show them that their intuition

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always has that answer. We have what is called sensory awareness.

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Then we have an intuitive, noospheric awareness, and most people,

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I call it the immanent mind and the transcendent mind

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higher mind, or the unreflective mind,

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the pre reflective mind and the reflective mind,

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depending on who you want to read their writings of.

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And I realized that we have access to vast amount of knowledge and can find the

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hidden order in the chaos. When I was 18,

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I also read Boltzmann's work and Einstein's on a Brownian movement.

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And I thought he never was satisfied with the idea of it just random systems.

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I always believed that randomness was just not knowing all the variables and all

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factors as Pascal described in his work.

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So I basically sat there and I tried to find the hidden order in the apparent

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chaos. And by God, when I found six and 13,

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columns 6 and 13 of the Demartini Method,

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and I found these synchronicities of opposites, I found a goldmine. And man,

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it's hard,

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it's hard not to share that with people because they run their life

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as victims of history. Instead of masters of destiny,

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they think there's chaos and their life is burdened and they don't see life on

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the way they see it in a way. But when I show them this,

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they realize there's nothing there out of order. They're graced,

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they have meaning, they find the mean,

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the pairs of the pairs of opposites joined. And there's enlightenment.

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There's an aha. There's an inspiration. There's a metaphysical jump.

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There's a, there's a, a true spirituality.

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Spirituality is not a tribal thinking and not an anthropomorphism of some

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religious dogma that's antiquated set up on Ptolemy's and Aristotle's view of

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the world with primum mobiles, that's antiquated. Spirituality has no race,

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creed, color, age, or sex limitations. It's transcendent.

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It has no local language monoglotic constructs.

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Its massively more vast than that. And,

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and I feel that we no matter what your background is, what your tradition is,

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there's a way now of discovering the magnificent intelligence of

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the universe, the pan psychic intelligence,

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the implicate order as David Bohm would describe

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in the universe, by asking the right questions.

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The quality of your life is based on the quality of the questions you ask,

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cause questions make you conscious of the unconscious.

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And then I went one step further on the next column.

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And I I realized that as long as we were comparing our life to a fantasy of

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one sidedness, we aren't gonna appreciate our life.

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So I had to crack the fantasies and the nightmares that it was leading to.

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So what I did is I said,

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go to the moment where and when you perceive this individual displaying or

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demonstrating the specific trait, action, inaction that you admire or despise.

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Let's say you despise. And at that moment,

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if they have done just the opposite of what you thought they did,

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that you despised and you admired that, what would have been the drawback?

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And I make them go into that moment.

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So that's where the moment where their intuition can answer that question

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without speculation. And go in there, what would be the drawback?

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And when they answer that, they go to the drawbacks of that.

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They break the fantasy of how it could and should have been, cause the could,

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should, and would have been's or whatever is interfering with the way it is.

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Anytime you compare your reality to a fantasy of how it should have been,

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you're not grounded in reality. What it is, is what it is.

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How does that serve you? How is what's happening right now,

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fulfilling your life? Not how has it, how is it should be like it used to be,

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or should be like I want it to be, or fantasize about it, but how is it worth?

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By cracking the fantasies,

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which is Column 14 in the Demartini Method and the nightmares,

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because when we're admiring somebody,

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if we were actually frightened of it's opposite,

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if we found the benefits of the opposite, we not only dissolve the infatuation.

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Cause when we infatuate with people,

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we minimize ourselves and then try to live in their values and then self

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depreciate.

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So infatuations are just as devastating to mastery of life as resentments.

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And both of them occupy your mind and run you.

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So I clear those in the last columns.

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And those are the first 14 columns of the Demartini Method.

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There's about 70 columns in this whole method,

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I'm not going to take the time to go through all, but those are the main ones.

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And then I went on further and I realized that there's another eight comms

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dealing with gain and loss.

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I realized that we only perceive loss of things we infatuate with.

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And we only perceive gain of things we, when we're infatuated with it,

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but if we all of a sudden aren't infatuated with something,

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we don't fear it's loss. See if we're infatuated with somebody,

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we fear they're going to leave us.

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If we're resentful to somebody we fear they're going to come close to us.

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If we're resentful to somebody, we hope they leave us.

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We look forward to leaving us. We're not, we're not frightened of that.

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And when we're resentful to somebody, when we're not resentful to somebody,

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we don't have a fear of them coming near us.

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So we're going to be run by external worlds by when we judge.

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So I developed further in another eight columns,

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how to dissolve grief and relief and how to dissolve these infatuations and

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resentments and how to realize nothing's missing in your life.

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And I've taught that now I've taken three,

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no 3,576 people who've

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lost loved ones and shown them how to dissolve grief.

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And it's an average about one hour, one hour and 15 minutes to two hours,

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max of three hours. And it's a science, it's reproducible.

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It's been studied now at Keio University in Japan.

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It's been demonstrated in hundreds, and hundreds, thousands of cases. And man,

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anyway, that's another eight columns plus 14,

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that's 22 columns right there of human transformation and it's

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profound. And when you're done with it,

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all you can sit is sit in awe with a tear in your eye. You'll have gratitude.

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You'll have love. You'll be inspired. You'll be thankful. You'll feel certain.

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You'll be present. And you realize it was,

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there was a hidden order in the apparent chaos, a magnificence.

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And this is what Leibniz was saying. My dream of finding that thing,

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that Leibniz said,

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that sense that I was destined to find that and be one of those people to do

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that. Once I found a science to that, and now I can share that,

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there's no human being that can't have that.

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There's no human being that can't have the ability to see both sides and see the

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synchronicities of opposites and be grateful for their life.

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Everything is ultimately on the way.

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I really believe that the universe has panpsychically intelligent and doing what

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it can to assist us in doing something magnificent with our life,

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to help us live authentic and inspired lives. And some people think, well,

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that's crazy, because they're victims.

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They want to run the story and they want to blame things.

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I've never seen blame of an external source causing you whatever this

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delusion you have. And some heroes, some fantasy individual, some,

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some saviour on the outside to save you, a magic bullet,

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like the magic bullet in medicine. Those are bullshit.

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They're not what makes it happen. The hero out there is not outside you.

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The villain out there is not outside you. They're completely inside you.

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And they're not even really heroes and villains.

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They're two parts of your nature that you must have in order to master your

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life. Anyway, I could go on for longer,

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but I just wanted to share the magnificence of that

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development of the method that I've now taken thousands,

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literally tens and tens of thousands of people through.

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And I hope to share that with you live so you can get to see yourself cause once

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you learn it, you'll realize it's not something you're going to throw away.

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You're going to put this into your life and use it over and over again.

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And we've got a new app that's soon going to be released about it,

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but please find a way of coming and learning,

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come to the Breakthrough Experience or whatever to learn how to put it in

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operation, because this is a very powerful tool. It's real true science.

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I've worked very hard on it for 47 years and it works.

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It freaking works and it's revolutionizing psychology. It is.

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And it deserves to,

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because of what's going on in psychology and in psychiatry is not doing the job,

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but now we have something that can. So I just wanted to share that with you.

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I hope you have a wonderful day and you may have to watch this a few times.

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I probably spoke a lot faster than you wanted, but I just,

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I just wanted to share that because it's my life's work. And so that,

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but that's the 22 sections out of about 70 or so more columns that I put

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together on every,

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I'd want to find the solutions to mastering life and the

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human behavior. And I,

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and I know this is something that you're going to put into your life,

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It's going to be helpful to you.

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So thank you for spending time with me and being with me on this particular

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presentation, The Amazing Power of The Demartini Method.

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So I look forward to seeing you at the next little gathering we have,

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conversation that I get to share. Okay.

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Have a super incredible day and think deeply about what I said and find a way of

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learning how to do the method. It will change your life.

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Thank you for joining me for this presentation today.

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If you found value out of the presentation,

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please go below and please share your comments.

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We certainly appreciate that feedback and be sure to subscribe and hit the

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notification icons.

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That way I can bring more content to share more to help you maximize your life.

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I look forward to our next presentation. Thank you so much for joining me.

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