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One Year of Construction Disruption with Ethan, Ryan, Seth, and Todd
Episode 5214th September 2022 • Construction Disruption • Isaiah Industries
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In this special episode, all four members of the Construction Disruption podcast assemble to reminisce, remark, and reflect on the first year of the show. After fifty-plus episodes, we take a walk back through our favorite moments, guests, and topics. We also discuss our outlook for the future of the show, and where we aim to be for the next year. Get to know us a little more and get a peek behind the scenes. 

Some of Our Favorite Episodes

Preserving Modernist Architecture with George Smart

Gamifying the Construction Process with Mary and Jason Sturgeon

Finding Hope through Adversity with Jordan and Mason Burchette

How to Increase Profits While Working Less with Benson Agbortogo

Career Centers Trump College with Tony Trapp

Changing Lives with Portable and Accessible Housing with RJ Adler

Climate Change and Construction with Crystal Egger and Kathryn Prociv

Passion and Vision: A New Mindset with Paula Parker

Lessons from a Veteran Salesperson with Frank Farmer

Try MagicMind, the world's first productivity shot!

https://magicmind.co/disruption and use discount code DISRUPTION20 to save 20% on your first order!

 

Thanks for listening to us over this past year. We hope you’ve learned something, been inspired, and had your horizons widened.

 

Here’s to another year of excellent guests and exciting news on the future of construction. 


For more Construction Disruption, listen on Apple Podcasts or YouTube


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Transcripts

Todd Miller:

:

Welcome to the Construction Disruption podcast, where we uncover the future of building and remodeling. I'm Todd Miller of Isaiah Industries, manufacturer of specialty metal roofing and other building materials. And today is a very special episode of the podcast as we are celebrating our one year anniversary.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Wooh, yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

Okay. Loud applause. So with me today are Seth Heckaman, Ryan Bell, and Ethan Young. All these folks are other Isaiah Industries team members who have played roles in this production over the past year. I even brought in donuts today. Did you get your donut yet?

Seth Heckaman:

:

I have not.

Ethan Young:

:

I didn't, yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, sorry. You're out of luck on that one. Ryan's off site today.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah, I did not.

Todd Miller:

:

Anyway, so I'm looking forward to this. This should be a great, unique episode today as we look back over the past year a bit and also as we look forward to the future. Anyone have any good stories to start us out with today?

Seth Heckaman:

:

Just wanted to honor, you know, special episode, honor a special person near us. It was kind of an unfortunate situation. Someone we knew here in Piqua, you know, had a health event and went into the hospital and really needed a blood transfusion as part of their treatment. And the family was around. And I guess this really is, you know, an endorsement of donating blood frequently because then you'll know and people close to you will know what sort of blood type you need. But this this individual who needed treatment was was unconscious, wasn't responding, family was around. They needed to know the blood type and they just didn't know and couldn't ask. The patient was a bit out of sorts and and they were standing around discussing this. You know, we wish we just knew, that way we could treat him and save him. But, you know, even in the midst of kind of the delusion and fog that the patient was in, he just kept encouraging his family, though, even up to the end and just kept saying, you know, be positive, be positive. It'll be okay, be positive. And so that was my dad joke attempt to begin with.

Todd Miller:

:

But that's a good one. That's a good one. You know, here as we're thinking about school starting off. I'm kind of reminded here in the local schools, they had that kidnapping at school kind of in the spring. That was pretty traumatic. They woke him up, everything's okay.

Ethan Young:

:

Oh, I thought about telling a dad joke, but I don't have kids. That would make me a faux pas. Yeah, a little wordplay there.

Todd Miller:

:

That is a good one.

Ryan Bell:

:

Nice. Well, I did not come prepared with a dad joke. I do have, well, I'm not good at remembering jokes, period. But there is one that I remember that I'll share and we may need to edit this out.

Todd Miller:

:

Those are the best kind.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah, I know, right. What type of bees make milk? Ethan's shaking his head.

Ethan Young:

:

Yeah, I have heard this.

Ryan Bell:

:

Maybe I don't even need to say it.

Ethan Young:

:

I'm gonna let them figure it out.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, you actually told me this, so I think, I think Seth is the only one in the dark on this.

Seth Heckaman:

:

What kind of bees make milk?

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah.

Seth Heckaman:

:

I've got nothing.

Ryan Bell:

:

Boobies.

Seth Heckaman:

:

I think that can stay. We've had a couple of episodes earn us an explicit rating for reasons we did not anticipate. So, but, uh, so that's been one thing we've learned and better understood as we've gone through this last year.

Todd Miller:

:

Has been indeed.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Ryan probably earned us a third one.

Todd Miller:

:

So along the line of, of insects and animals, anyone familiar with what the Pink Panther said when he stepped on an ant?

Ethan Young:

:

I don't know.

Todd Miller:

:

Dead ant, dead ant, dead ant dead ant dead ant, dead ant, dead ant. Okay.

Ethan Young:

:

Geez, that's a good one.

Todd Miller:

:

I don't know. I think Ethan has to win that round now.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Yeah, no.

Todd Miller:

:

Ryan's was awfully good, too.

Ethan Young:

:

Yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

They were all good. So, just so our audience knows, today, we also each have a challenge word in our episode. So this is a unique word that each of us has been challenged to try to bring into work into the episode. And so we encourage our listeners, see if you can spot that challenge word, that rather odd word we may use at some point. At the end of the show, we'll tell you what they were and whether we were successful. So driving forward, it dawned on me that perhaps our audience doesn't know each of you folks all that well. Very quickly, could you just introduce yourself, perhaps share a bit of what you do here at Isaiah Industries and even though we all wear a lot of hats. But anyway and then share one thing about yourself that is unique or something that might surprise our audience. I am exempt from those questions so I don't have to answer it. That makes it more fun.

Ryan Bell:

:

Mm hmm. I'll start, if that's all right.

Todd Miller:

:

Awesome.

Ryan Bell:

:

This is Ryan, since nobody can see me, I'm the creative director here at Isaiah. Like Todd said, we all wear a lot of hats. My main focus has always kind of been on developing and designing marketing materials and logos and brochures and banners and stuff like that, both in-house and for our dealer's. Trade show type things, that sort of stuff, along with some marketing, social media, video sorts of things. And I'm kind of, I guess one of the producers behind the scenes here for Construction Disruption, I handle a lot of the the editing and the publishing and the graphics and stuff like that for each episode. What was the last part of your thing? Something unique about.

Todd Miller:

:

Something unique about yourself or something that might surprise folks?

Ryan Bell:

:

I don't know. Gosh, there's probably a lot. Something, so I, this'll probably surprise you guys, too, but something new. I like learning. I love learning new things, learning how to do new things. I have always wanted more tattoos.

Todd Miller:

:

So you're learning to give them to yourself?

Ryan Bell:

:

Yes, I am.

Todd Miller:

:

Are you serious?

Ethan Young:

:

Oh, really, okay.

Todd Miller:

:

Oh, I thought I was joking.

Ryan Bell:

:

No, I realized, you know, it's never been a priority because they're expensive, one.

Todd Miller:

:

Sure.

Ryan Bell:

:

And with a family, it's just hard to justify spending money on tattoos. But the tattoo industry has changed a lot. It's probably been, you know, 15 years since my last one done in a tattoo studio. And the industry has changed a lot and become more affordable. And the things that are out there now, pretty much everything's disposable now, except for the main part of the machine. So it's much easier. And I just started researching and I was like, I can totally do this. So a few months ago I decided to learn how to tattoo. And I have now given myself three tattoos.

Ethan Young:

:

Nice.

Todd Miller:

:

That is cool, especially with your artistic and creative abilities. There's probably certain parts of your body you just can't reach, though, I would assume. So certain things are limited.

Ryan Bell:

:

And really the only place you're supposed to tattoo yourself is on your thighs because you need both hands. You need your other hand to stretch the skin properly. But I went for one on my arm, which turned out okay. It needs another round to clean it up. But yeah, those are you know, I just learned everything from YouTube, too, and we've talked about that before on previous episodes.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Are you willing to share what one of your new three are?

Ryan Bell:

:

Well, the one on my arm. So there's a, I guess I can show it to you guys on camera, but no one else is going to be able to see it. So the oldest tattoo studio in the world is in Jerusalem. If you guys know that they've been around for like over 700 years and they tattoo pilgrims and if you Google it, it's Razzouk Tattoo. Who they have, you know, kind of these, their stencils are like these old stamps that, you know, I think they would stamp on and they're still kind of doing those same things. But, you know, people go there specifically to get tattooed. So I took some inspiration from some of their main designs and kind of came up with my own. But it's a Jerusalem cross. Oh, I don't even know if I can get it on camera. A Jerusalem cross with three crowns on the top, which is kind of one of their designs. And then it says IHS the bottom of the cross goes down to IHS and kind of like a black letter, which was Jesus. I have not filled it in yet. I just did the outline because I wanted to see how it came out.

Ethan Young:

:

That's cool.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Wow. Impressive.

Todd Miller:

:

Goodness. Can either of you guys top that?

Seth Heckaman:

:

I'm not sharing anything unique.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah, beat that.

Todd Miller:

:

Good stuff.

Seth Heckaman:

:

I'm Seth Heckaman, VP of Sales here at Isaiah Industries. So I get to work with our sales team and customer support team serving homeowners, contractors, distributors, and other trade professionals across North America. So we're we are blessed with an incredible team here, as Todd has reiterated over and over again. But, you know, we're real, real blessed to get to work with those folks and always striving to provide the highest level of support and service and expertize that we can for those that we get to serve. I'm not cool enough to tattoo myself. Unique, interesting, I do most of the cooking at my house, so it is an ongoing negotiation of how many grills I am allowed to have on the patio. So I think I'm up to five and I may need to enter into the negotiation of expanding the patio and giving Nicole some more space. And then I may be able to build a spot for a sixth one, but we'll see.

Todd Miller:

:

That's impressive as well. Wow, speaking of.

Ryan Bell:

:

What are the?

Todd Miller:

:

Go ahead.

Ryan Bell:

:

Sorry. I was going to say, what are the different types of grills?

Ethan Young:

:

Yeah, that's what I was going to ask, too.

Ryan Bell:

:

I have two and I thought that was one too many.

Seth Heckaman:

:

But I'm a Weber guy, like I really enjoy it. So I have the Weber bullett smoker, the 18-inch, the middle size. Then I have two just traditional kettles which you've got to have if you're doing two different, like if you're doing a a slow cook on one and a fast on the other, you got people over and you want to grill some sides. And then I have the Weber Gas for daily, you know or not, yeah, you know weeknight needs. And then I got a Traeger last fall, so I have that too. So if anyone is interested still, the smoke flavor on charcoal is superior to pellets, but the convenience and ease of use is unmatched. So the next one will be the 26-inch Weber probably, which, you know, it doesn't sound like a lot, but it makes a big difference.

Todd Miller:

:

That is a lot of grills, I'll tell you. So when you first said grills, I started thinking of those, I don't understand those things people put on their teeth, those ornamental things they put on their teeth that they call grills. I, I don't get those at all anyway. Okay, Ethan, tell us about yourself.

Ethan Young:

:

So I'm Ethan Young. I'm the content writer here at Isaiah and do a lot of writing. I do some photography, videography. My role at the podcast is kind of helping set up the camera, get all the audio stuff ready, and making sure it can, you know, come out the best it can so it can go to Ryan and then he can edit it for hours and hours. And something interesting about me. So in the last year or so, I recently started playing Dungeons and Dragons with some friends from college, which is something I was kind of against at first. I wasn't sure. You know, I think there's kind of a negative perception about it, but it's been really fun. It's kind of just storytelling with your friends, basically. So it's been a good time.

Todd Miller:

:

Very cool. And just in case our audience wanders, Ethan really is as chill as he sounds on these. Just this chill, cool guy. Very neat. So I will share something unique about myself that I thought, Oh I don't know, it's unique. Just a story I've never told anyone this in my life. It is a true story. I was not a fan of gym class in school, I gotta confess, and somehow I got through, I think high school, only taking one gym class my entire high school career, which was pretty impressive. And that was a little creativity that I did. But anyway, we were playing baseball. I actually hit a triple in baseball in gym class. Now, the only reason I got a triple was the outfielder was too lazy to go chase the ball. Had I been able to move a little faster, it would have been an inside the park home run. But anyway. That's my story.

Seth Heckaman:

:

The pinnacle of your athletic career.

Todd Miller:

:

It absolutely is, yeah, yeah. Here we are 40 years later still talking about it. You're the first to have ever heard about it. Anyway, so I'm curious and I want to talk about what this experience has been like to develop and produce Construction Disruption. I know that for me and someone touched on this earlier, I think it was Ryan wanting to be a lifelong learner and learn things. And I've loved that about doing this show and that we have had so many guests that have brought new ideas and forward-thinking things that are going on in our industry. And it just seems like every episode I learn something, whether, you know, whether it's been about 3D printing or A.I. or or any of the myriad of other things we've talked about. But anyway, anyone else want to share anything about what your experience has been?

Ethan Young:

:

I would say for me, just the practical terms of setting everything up. I have done live production stuff before, but it was kind of fun learning a whole new workflow and getting used to that. And then also just how willing people are to share with you, like their passions and stuff. We've had a lot of interesting guests like Todd said, and people love it when you give them a platform to come on and share stuff and not like you said. I've learned a lot of interesting stuff that I would have never known about otherwise, so it's been valuable for me.

Seth Heckaman:

:

It's really reinforced how broad and the wide expanse that is our industry, you know, in some of the interest, what is the number been, $3 billion industry or I forget. Just remember it is really big. But in learning all these kind of nooks and crannies of the industry and in meeting interesting people and and doing that in a time where, you know, over the last couple of years, you know, we've all been navigating this maelstrom of a market that we've been handed and figuring our way through it and making those connections in the midst of that and seeing how others are coming up with new innovative ideas, tactics, and practices just to ensure that themselves and others can continue to be successful regardless of the circumstances.

Todd Miller:

:

Very good. Ryan, what's your experience been?

Ryan Bell:

:

Well, you know, I've kind of pushed or mentioned we should do a podcast for a while, kind of on and off. I'm a big podcast guy, I love listening to podcasts and I've always wanted the opportunity to produce one. I'm not a huge talker, so I've never been able to kind of start one on my own, but or I guess felt like I could. But so, you know, when this idea came up to start Construction Disruption, I was all for it. And, and I love audio. I love working with audio files and editing and all that stuff. But I did not know, I guess really how much was involved with the production and how long the editing could take or how much time you could spend on it. I'm kind of a perfectionist, which I think can be a curse sometimes.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Kind of.

Ryan Bell:

:

Kind of, yeah. You know, a lot of the time, I guess, you know, so I really, you know, and as far as the editing goes and it's been a constant attempt at improving, I would say, you know, we're, we're like fifty episodes in now.

Ethan Young:

:

Yeah.

Ryan Bell:

:

And I feel like we have continually tried different platforms and different ways of doing things and recording and trying to streamline our processes, which, you know, that that happens in every business, I think, or it should. And I've enjoyed that, I've enjoyed learning about all these different tools that can be used and also kind of learning how to how to let go of certain things and, and just get content out there, you know, which is probably more important than perfecting it or making sure it's perfect or making sure I have the right EQ settings on, on someone's voice, you know, things nobody else is going to notice or hear but me. And that kind of brings me into something else I want to share with our listeners, because I guess my kids would probably call this a hack, even though it's in the form of a liquid. I, like I said, I like trying new things. I do both like learning stuff as well as experimenting with different things that are out there, products to make your life better. I found this productivity drink, I believe is what they call it. It's called Magic Mind and I was lucky enough to get some to try. Basically what it is, it's a organic herbal supplement shot that's about two ounces, I think. And it's got all this good stuff for you in it. I think a lot of people drink it to replace their coffee. And I actually that's how I found it. I was searching for a coffee replacement. I wanted to try to stop drinking coffee, I never drank coffee because I was tired or to try to wake me up in the morning. I'm a morning person. I really just like the taste and smell of coffee, but I wanted to give it a shot. I guess I've reached the point in my life where I've noticed myself getting older and other things affecting me and the crash that would happen after, you know, four cups of coffee was starting to get worse. And I'm like, I know I probably should, you know, cut back on the caffeine. That's how I found Magic Mind and their messaging or the benefits of it are, you know, more energy, relaxation, helps with anxiety, reducing stress, focus, cognitive ability, all sorts of things like that. I'm not even going to try to mention or name some of the ingredients in it because I will probably pronounce them wrong. But it's kind of like nootropics, which I do know how to say that like Lion's Mane helps with cognition and focus and stuff like that. So, so anyways, I started drinking Magic Mind and I noticed the editing. To make a long story short, the editing process is very mundane and long, and it's hard, especially for a creative person like me to stay focused on. And we all have those mundane, tedious tasks in our day to day routine. And I 100% noticed a difference once I started drinking Magic Mind in how fast and efficient I was able to edit and get each episode out the door. There was a dramatic difference in terms of being able to stay focused on what I was working on and just plowing through it. I guess I don't know how to explain it.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, I happen to have a bottle of Magic Mind right here, so I'm going to break it open and it says on it. So a few things I'll read off the label, it says gives you energy, helps you relax, keeps you focused, makes you happy. I like all those things. It also says do more, stress less. Considering most of my life tends to be the opposite, do less and stress more, that seems like a good thing. The directions are number one, shake. I shook it before I opened it. Two, breathe. That's kind of unavoidable for me at this point. That could change at any moment at my age. And 3, it says to drink it. So I'm going to try chugging this. I have had it before. And then I'll describe it.

Ryan Bell:

:

Is it, is it cold?

Todd Miller:

:

Well, it was what we started this. But at this point, no, it's not.

Seth Heckaman:

:

So as Todd is drinking that and mentioning his age this morning, he did offhand tell me, hey, I think just so you know, we have this piece of equipment somewhere in the warehouse. Okay, thank you. That's good to know. Is there a reason you're telling me this or just in case you die, someone else here knows that. Pretty much the latter.

Todd Miller:

:

Always be prepared. So I drank it. It has a bit of a, I wouldn't say earthy, but green earth has a green taste.

Ryan Bell:

:

I think it's good. I like it.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, one of the ingredients I'm reading is pepper extract. And I taste the pepperiness. And I am a pepper nut. I mean, I drove my wife nuts when I cook because everything is so peppered. No, I don't mind it at all, it's good. So we'll leave it up to the audience to see whether there is a change in my energy level for the rest of this episode.

Ryan Bell:

:

Awesome. And actually the folks at Magic Mind were kind enough to send over a a discount code for anyone in our audience that wants to try it out. It's only good for ten days. They have, there's two ways you can purchase it on their website. You can do a one-time purchase or you can sign up for a subscription if you go to magicmind.co, not .com, .co/disruption and use the discount code Disruption20. I'll make sure we get that in the show notes, but that will give you, I believe, 40% off your first order if it's a subscription and then 20% off if you just or don't sign up for the subscription and just place a one-time order, but it's only good for ten days. Again, I highly recommend you check it out. Try it If you're looking for something like this to kind of give you a boost and focus and relaxation and energy and all that stuff.

Todd Miller:

:

Awesome, Magic Mind. Okay, good stuff. So on to our next thing I want to ask you guys. Anyone want to comment on a favorite guest or episode from our first year of Construction Disruption or perhaps a moment that you really remember or maybe something that surprised you? I know one of the episodes that stands out in my mind. I'll get mine in first before anyone else steals it. One of the ones that stands out in my mind was George Smart, who spoke about preserving modernist architecture. And he's not an architect, he's just a guy that loves modern architecture and has kind of developed a society and an organization to talk about it and preserve it and celebrate it. And he was just fascinating. I just really enjoyed it because and that's architecture I enjoy as well. So I think that was episode twenty-three. Definitely, definitely one of my favorites.

Ethan Young:

:

I went back and looked and mine was pretty close in time there. I think it was episode 25 with Jason and Mary Sturgeon. I really like these two. I felt like they had a lot of good stuff to say and especially their approach to kind of helping people and elevating people in their in their lives, in their businesses. And I thought it was a really kind of uplifting episode.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, that's been a fun part of it, too. So many people we hear are in careers where they're working from their passion. You know, they've got a passion about caring for other people or developing other people. And we see a lot of that in the various episodes. I mean, another one I really enjoyed was the one with Mason and Jordan Burchette, where they told a very personal story that I found uplifting. And it was a time where they went through some adversity and pretty ballsy of them to tell that story. But that certainly was one of my favorites of all of them. Anyone else want to share a favorite episode?

Ryan Bell:

:

Sure, I'll share mine and this will probably surprise you. Mine, and this is hard to pick a favorite one because there were so many good ones. But the episode with Benson and I cannot remember how to pronounce his last name.

Ethan Young:

:

I think it's Agbortogo. I think the g is silent.

Ryan Bell:

:

It was episode forty about increasing profits while working less. I thought that was just a great episode. And really, I think I probably it's probably my favorite because I liked his personality and attitude. And I also spent the most time editing that episode because he has a pretty thick accent. So I don't know if I just naturally bonded with him because I spent so much time listening to it.

Ethan Young:

:

I was going to say, I think I didn't do the transcript for that. I think you did that one.

Ryan Bell:

:

No yeah, you were on vacation or something. That one took a while, but I don't know, I really enjoyed it and I got a lot out of that episode.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, he's a great guy to follow on LinkedIn also. Always posts a lot of good inspiration and encouraging things. Yeah, that one, they all stand out in my mind and I once said that my favorite one tends to be the last one we did just because I've enjoyed them all a great deal.

Seth Heckaman:

:

For similar reasons, I really enjoyed our episode with Tony Trapp, which was unique for us, for that it was someone actually here locally. But is a leader nationally in the trades education at the high school level for young people, giving them an opportunity that hasn't always been as endorsed and promoted as traditional college and beyond. But just hearing and learning more about what those opportunities that do exist. But then also blessed me hearing his spirit and passion for just loving and caring for the next generation of of young people. Other, R.J. Adler, I really enjoyed from Wheelpad. You know, hearing great example of some new innovative, new perspective on thinking about really meeting a need and construction with, you know ADUs and temporary accessibility in homes. Krystal Eggers and Katherine Prociv, that was probably the one if I had to pick one where I learned the most, I felt like really learned a lot. That episode of just whether we can have the discussion on whether you want to call it climate change or something else, but just the the transitions and constant evolution of climate and then how that needs to be considered and how we're building and repairing, rebuilding after events. That was very interesting.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah, that was a good one also. And I'm glad you mentioned Tony Trapp. And you know, this is a guy with a heart as big as can be that everyone local knows. And, you know, another one of my favorites was our first episode, Paula Parker, where she talked about, you know, the process of change and how you bring that about. And I think that was hugely eye-opening. Frank Farmer talking about the sales process was really, really a good episode as well. So yeah, it's fun. Every once in a while I'll be sitting at home and just sit and listen to some snippets of one that we've already done. And yeah, always, always find it enjoyable. Well, as we wrap up our first year and head into our second year, anyone have any thoughts on a dream guest or ways in which you hope we can bring more value to our listeners in year two? Or like I said, folks you would love to have on as a guest?

Seth Heckaman:

:

You keep tweeting at Elon, but he hasn't replied yet. But maybe we'll get him eventually.

Todd Miller:

:

Man, he gets mentioned on here a lot, though. Whenever we have to ask the question of who would you like to trade places with for a day? His name comes up quite, quite frequently. And and my goodness, he'd be awesome. I'd love to have a guest that would, and I've looked for this and made a couple of reach outs. Love to have a guest that would talk about, you know, what would construction look like on the moon or Mars and anyone would have some thoughts on that, undoubtedly.

Seth Heckaman:

:

I do think, I'm excited to even have some of the guests that we've had come back on. We've got some great opportunity just, you can only cover so much in a half hour to forty-five minutes. But it's this year it seems like we're had our arms spread really wide trying to yeah bring in kind of the far-flung areas of the industry together and just really making those cross connections and kind of into some pretty esoteric and specific conversations. And maybe yeah, having some episodes of some in the future of some really okay, hard, brass tacks kind of tools and tactics that then we can bring to folks of people that are being successful. Yeah, of here's how we can go out and implement these methods and grow our businesses immediately. So I think that that could be cool to bring back and have that type of focus of immediately implementable, you know, new methods that could bring some great value across the industry.

Ethan Young:

:

Yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

Good stuff.

Ethan Young:

:

I kind of look at it as like a snowman. We rolled out this big group of guests and put them up there and they, you know, they were a good foundation for us, but now we want to kind of narrow things down, put up that middle part of it. You know, as we keep going, maybe it'll be a pretty tall snowman, I guess. But eventually we'll get to that head where we have it very focused and you know, just the right size. So I think we'll get there.

Todd Miller:

:

Very good.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah, I agree. You know, thinking about all the potential guests that, you know, that are out there could be very vertiginous, but. You know, just trying to to come up with who would be good. You know, there's just so many, there are so many opportunities out there. Top of my list is Elon. I think that would make a ton of sense and I would love it if he was on the the podcast. I would like to you know, we've talked about the future and moving forward and maybe being a little more focused, but I would love to have a comedian on too. I think that would be a great episode. Also, Ryan Reynolds, I love I follow Ryan Reynolds on. He's one of my favorite actors on LinkedIn, you know, and he talks a lot about marketing and he's done some crazy, incredible stuff with advertising and ad campaigns. And, you know, for his companies and others, I think that could be interesting.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Does he own that cell phone company?

Ethan Young:

:

Okay, Mint Mobile.

Ryan Bell:

:

I don't know if he's the full owner but I believe, yes, he.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Interesting.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah.

Seth Heckaman:

:

I really, I enjoy their ads that they're doing now.

Ryan Bell:

:

I enjoy his sense of humor a lot.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, my dream guest would be someone who is hilarious but doesn't realize they are hilarious. And that's who I really looking for is the person that yeah, they may be a little bit out there with some of their thinking that challenges you and makes you laugh, but at the same time they're pretty serious about it, so I'm not going to tell them that's why I chose them as a guest. I suppose that would be in bad form, but.

Ryan Bell:

:

Now every future guest is going to wonder.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah, am I that guy.

Ethan Young:

:

That clueless guy.

Todd Miller:

:

Am I the crackpot? Okay. Well, anyway, I will say, if if anybody in our audience has any ideas or suggestions for topics or future guests, something you would love to hear us dig into and bring a unique perspective on. Drop me a note todd.miller@isaiahindustries.com and would love to hear from you and hear your ideas and suggestions. Again, todd.miller@isaiahindustries.com. So curious you guys, anyone want to talk about what you enjoy about the construction industry? Any ways that you find it inspirational or enjoyable. I mean, I'll say I, I just I love the relationships and I suppose I could be in any industry and be able to build those same relationships. But what I find so often in construction is because so many of the people in our industry came from banging nails, as they say, you know, they just they're very pure and they're very open. They're very honest and not pretentious. And I just love those relationships that I've been able to build over, yeah, I won't even say 40-some years now. This is why I'm telling people where pieces of equipment are hidden.

Seth Heckaman:

:

You know, just an industry that's so service-centric and meeting one of the most foundational needs of of humanity. And then also, you know, in that service, because it is such a critical need and there's just a lot of emotion invested with at every level of the of the industry, all the way down to the final home or building or dwelling and just so critical to the quality of life for everybody involved. So I think that that creates just an invested heart interest for so many folks and a pure interest of just wanting to care and take care of people and ultimately provide something that is meaningful, valuable and tangible, too. It's not an industry where you just watch dollars float around spreadsheets. You have something to show for it at the end of the day too.

Ethan Young:

:

So I think for me, it's been I'm quite sure how to phrase it, but kind of opening up a new area of life that I never thought about. Not that it's, but I didn't think about like, oh, you know, this roof or this roof. And then I notice just a couple, you know, after being involved in the construction industry a little more, I see myself going and I'm thinking, man, they really need to replace that roof or there's something wrong with that. So I would say for me it's just been kind of peeling back something that I kind of took for granted or didn't think about before and kind of given me a little bit of a window into it and how much it affects everybody.

Ryan Bell:

:

You're officially part of the team when you constantly look at roofs.

Todd Miller:

:

That does happen eventually.

Seth Heckaman:

:

A fender bender is coming eventually.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, I know when we first kind of developed the the idea and the concept for construction disruption and Ryan came up with a fantastic name that I still love and is gaining a lot of traction. But, you know, one of my thoughts was I really wanted to be able to reach folks who were new to our industry or perhaps young in their careers. Because one of the things that the construction industry has talked about for years is it's not a particularly sexy industry that a lot of folks are flocking to be a part of. And so my hope was that if we did get new folks, we'd get them as audience members and, you know, really start to build into them and show them what the potential is and help them be the best that they can be in our industry. I remember, you know, a couple of the guests we've had were coaches to help coach people in their careers and help them find their real sweet spots in life. But that's always been one of my hopes, is help to encourage and bring new folks into the industry. What do you guys think? What types of things do you hope that we're bringing to the industry through this show?

Ryan Bell:

:

I think my my ultimate hope is that we are just helping people succeed and do better what they do, improve their life. You know, whether that's all work life or a home life or a mix of both, but just helping improve people's lives through what is being shared here. That's my biggest hope, I guess.

Todd Miller:

:

That's cool.

Ethan Young:

:

I think mine plays into that a little bit and a little bit to the last answer I gave, where I think it's just cool to kind of give this an outlet for people to share some of their life and their work and kind of share that with other people and get a glimpse into their world. And I know for me, like I said, it's opened up a lot of different, you know, views or a lot of different things I didn't have really any idea about. And so I think doing that for other people would be cool, you know, with a lot of different topics. You know, we recently had solar and home energy storage and that was something I kind of knew about. But I went in and researched and then we learned a lot in the episode. So I think it's just cool to kind of share that information.

Todd Miller:

:

Well, very interesting. Well, we're about to the end of our time. Anyone have anything else that you want to share that we haven't covered yet? Well, after that grounding sound of crickets, we will move on.

Seth Heckaman:

:

I did want to say. Thank you, guys. You guys have, the three of you have carried a much heavier load on this project than I have. I've just gotten to show up and talk a little bit and ask people questions. But this has been a lot of fun to be a part of and looking forward to what the next evolution of it's going to look like in the second year.

Todd Miller:

:

So yeah, I'll second that. It really has been fun and it's taken, I think, more effort than any of us thought that it would require, but been very, very cool. So one of our favorite parts of each episode, at least my favorite part, and I think for all of us, is what we call our rapid-fire question round. This is where we ask our guests some random questions and ask for their quick response. So we're going to do a little bit different take on it. We each have prepared a question, I think, to ask the others, and I think it's fair if we answer our own questions also. But I'll go ahead and ask the first rapid-fire question of you guys, what is your least favorite sound? I'll go ahead and share mine while you guys are thinking about yours. Oh, my goodness. I can't stand the sound or the feel of fingernails on brushed stainless steel or any sort of brushed metal. It just sends shivers down my spine, which is bad when you've spent your entire career in the metal industry. Anyway, that's my least favorite sound.

Ryan Bell:

:

I'll share mine. Mine is kids whining.

Todd Miller:

:

I had a feeling it might be something like that.

Ryan Bell:

:

Can't stand the whining. I love them, but I cannot stand the whining.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Yeah, I've noticed, at four it started somewhere. If we are going to continue whining, you can do so by yourself in your room. Now the next choice is yours. I cannot. If there is a fly in the house and I'm hearing buzzing, no matter how far away, I cannot relax. So if I come home at the end of the day and Nicole knows there's one somewhere, she kind of meets me at the door with the swatter, and I've got to take care of that before anything else can be done. This may get us yeah, PETA, it pust us in PETA's crosshairs, but we all know what comes next.

Todd Miller:

:

I know you gently pick them up and carry them outside.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Exactly. Yes.

Ethan Young:

:

I think mine, I was going to say Styrofoam, like squeaky Styrofoam. But I think it's actually more like nails on a chalkboard that is just, I don't know, it really gets me.

Todd Miller:

:

That's kind of like the stainless, the brushed steel thing.

Ethan Young:

:

Yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

Okay. Next rapid-fire question.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Other than Construction Disruption, what's your guys's favorite podcast or podcast you enjoy?

Ryan Bell:

:

I, I have a lot that I kind of bounce between. I will download a few episodes and listen to them like while I'm mowing or whatnot. And, and then I think I kind of get sick of them and I bounce to a different one. But the one I've been hooked on lately is called Up Flip. It's about starting and growing businesses, and there's just a lot of great stories on there about how people have kind of started different things. So they're just all success stories and I find it really inspiring.

Ethan Young:

:

I don't really listen to podcasts, but I did catch kind of a clip of a chunk of one recently that I thought was interesting. I think the interviewer's name was Lex Fridman, but he was interviewing John Carmack, who, one of the early guys at ID who made Doom and Wolfenstein and all that. So like an incredibly talented programmer, the guy's insane. I mean, he basically helped invent FPS, but it was just interesting to hear a guy like that talk because he went on to do VR stuff and Oculus and all this, and he had some interesting views on stuff. That's the last one I really listened to.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Awesome. Yeah, Lex does some interesting interviews, that's for sure.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, I have to say, I don't listen to many podcasts either. And isn't that horrible? I have listened to Crime Junkie a few times and I sort of enjoy Crime Junkie. I think someone also, as we were driving across the country once on a business trip, had me listening to something called S Town.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Yes.

Todd Miller:

:

And that was pretty good also.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Yes, that is one of my favorite of all time favorites. But Serial is good. NPR puts out Serial, they do a nice job with lots of. I like that sort of investigative journalism, long form story. That's good stuff. Craig Rochelle Monthly Leadership Podcast is good. Martyr Made is a good history podcast. Those are my favorite.

Ryan Bell:

:

So I got to add, like, you know, just the crime stuff is I love it. Once I start listening to it, I can't stop. So I try to avoid them. But we did go to Florida this summer and drove. And so I downloaded a ton of crime and I was like, No, I'm good. I'm driving, I'm driving the whole way. And I just had my earbuds and one episode after another. It was awesome. Those are definitely good. It's great storytelling is what it is, you know.

Seth Heckaman:

:

There's been road trips where I'm driving long, you know, during the day and get hooked on one and I sit in the hotel in the dark and don't have the TV on instead of just have the podcast playing in the background.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

I used to listen to The Moth some to, I think it was called. I haven't listened to that in a while, but used to listen to that on occasion. So our next rapid-fire question, Ryan, you want to share?

Ryan Bell:

:

Sure. Actually, I had one in mind, but I changed it. What is your favorite movie of all time? I can, I can lead off because I know what mine is if you guys need a minute to think.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Go for it.

Ryan Bell:

:

Okay. Mine is, I don't know that it's a very well known movie, but it's called The Guardian with Kevin Costner and Ashton Kutcher. It's about the Coast Guard, about a rescue swimmer. It's been, I don't watch it a lot. I did when it first came out. And it must have just been at a time in my life where it was the right timing to watch that movie. But I loved the story there, and it's always been my ultimate favorite movie.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Yeah, that's that's a good one. I don't know. Mine feels really juvenile, but I've got to be honest with you all and our listeners, Tommy Boy is the movie I go back to over and over and over again.

Ethan Young:

:

I just watched that for the first time, like on my trip back from Italy. I watched it on the flight.

Ryan Bell:

:

No way.

Ethan Young:

:

I watched that and Happy Gilmore and a couple others.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Great.

Ethan Young:

:

For me, this is kind of tough because I was going to say Interstellar, but I don't know how much of that was just the soundtrack carrying it. And so I think it might be Blade Runner. I really loved Blade Runner when I watched that; it was pretty cool.

Ryan Bell:

:

Good movie.

Todd Miller:

:

You know, that's a hard question for me. I, I don't watch many movies anymore. And I mean, back when I was in college, there was dollar night at the theaters. So I saw every movie that went out from about 1982 to 1986, a dollar a night. But, you know, I hear people who say, you know, I've watched that movie several times. There is only one movie I've ever watched more than once, so I guess it has to qualify as my favorite. And that is Stand By Me. But that's the only movie I've ever seen more than one time in my entire life.

Ryan Bell:

:

Wow.

Todd Miller:

:

Ethan, wrap us up with our final rapid-fire question.

Ethan Young:

:

Alright. I got two, let me see which one I want to do. Oh, okay. Would you rather be reincarnated as a cat or a dog?

Ryan Bell:

:

Oh, dog, for sure.

Todd Miller:

:

I have to say dog also, I'm very allergic to cats, and I can't imagine anything worse than being allergic to yourself.

Ethan Young:

:

I don't know how that would work, yeah.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Goodness. The introvert in me says cat.

Todd Miller:

:

Because you can just hide under the bed all day.

Seth Heckaman:

:

But the litter box, it probably tips me towards dogs.

Todd Miller:

:

I don't know. That sounds convenient.

Ryan Bell:

:

You don't have to wait on anybody.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Right, I guess that is.

Ryan Bell:

:

That's a good point. Maybe I answered too soon.

Ethan Young:

:

Because cat like you get pampered and all this stuff and you know, they're always buying you toys and stuff.

Ryan Bell:

:

I'm a dog guy, so in my gut reaction was dog, but maybe I need to change mine.

Seth Heckaman:

:

I think I'm cat, the convenient way. I think it's cat.

Todd Miller:

:

The convenience of peeing in the corner of your room.

Ethan Young:

:

I think it is cat for me too. Just the independence of it. But dog, I don't know, dogs are great. Like, I love dogs, you know, they're awesome. But I think it would be cat maybe. I'm not sure.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Goodness, four dog people saying cat to actually be. That's interesting.

Todd Miller:

:

I'm still dog. I couldn't be allergic to myself.

Ryan Bell:

:

I'm sticking with dog.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Okay.

Todd Miller:

:

Yeah I can't change.

Ryan Bell:

:

There's good arguments for being a cat, though.

Todd Miller:

:

Those were good guys. Hey, thank you, this has been a very fun episode. Thank you so much. So we got to talk about our challenge words. We all got them worked in. My challenge word which was given to me by Ethan, as I recall, was ornamental. So I worked that one in. What was your challenge word, Seth?

Seth Heckaman:

:

Maelstrom.

Todd Miller:

:

And who gave you that?

Seth Heckaman:

:

Todd; a cataclysmic event, turmoil, tumultuous.

Ethan Young:

:

That's a good one, yeah.

Todd Miller:

:

I congratulate you, you all worked them in, great job. Ryan, what was your word?

Ryan Bell:

:

Vertiginous. I'm not even sure if I said it right when I said it.

Ethan Young:

:

That's a heck of a word.

Todd Miller:

:

You said it right and it made perfect sense. It's one of those words that you just kind of assume what it means based upon what it sounds like, and you just kind of go with that, okay.

Ryan Bell:

:

I thought about just like coughing and being like vertiginous.

Ethan Young:

:

I wondered how you were going to work it in.

Ryan Bell:

:

Just randomly.

Ethan Young:

:

Mine was snowman, which I really wanted to do something with Frosty the Snowman, but I just couldn't find the right opportunity.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Favorite movie, it could have been.

Ethan Young:

:

Yeah, that's true. I just didn't know.

Ryan Bell:

:

Yeah.

Ethan Young:

:

Got impatient.

Todd Miller:

:

That would have been a tiny bit juvenile I suppose, but.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Not more juvenile than Tommy Boy.

Seth Heckaman:

:

Todd Miller: Well, and I will say this. I have never seen Tommy Boy all the way through, but there are bits and pieces of it I've seen multiple times. Well, this has been great. Thank you all so very much. I appreciate each of you and all that you bring here to make Construction Disruption a huge success across the planet. I think we've gotten a little bit of recognition and gaining some traction and doing some good stuff. So thank you all and thank you for tuning in to this episode of Construction Disruption. Please watch for and listen for future episodes of our podcast, even though this one you are subjected to us, normally, we have great guests on tap. Don't forget to leave a review on Apple Podcasts or YouTube. Until next time, change the world for someone, make them smile, encourage them. Powerful things you can do to change the world. God bless, take care. This is Isaiah Industries signing off until the next episode of Construction Disruption.

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