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Refining and Defining Who I am and How I Fit The Role
Episode 45th January 2024 • In The Bunker • Joshua Maddux
00:00:00 00:29:13

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Summary:

In this episode of "In The Bunker," Frank Schieber, Sr. Demand Generation Manager at Virtusa, shares his personal journey of overcoming employment gaps and the challenges of staying ahead in the fast-paced world of marketing. Frank discusses how he refined and defined his role in the industry, offering valuable insights and advice for those navigating similar career challenges.

Our episode highlights:

  • Frank’s experience with employment gaps and the stigma associated with them.
  • His approach to evolving and adapting in the field of marketing and demand generation.
  • Strategies Frank used to overcome his biggest business challenges.
  • Frank's advice for individuals currently facing career challenges, emphasizing continuous learning, self-definition, and the importance of a strong support system.

Bio:

Frank Schieber is a metro Atlanta-based marketing expert with a wealth of experience in campaign strategy, management, communications, and analytics for B2B technology brands and select non-profit organizations. He is an influential figure in the field, known for his innovative approaches to marketing and demand generation. Frank holds a Master of Business Administration from Kennesaw State University and a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism from The University of Georgia. His academic accolades also include Data Science and Data Analytics certifications from General Assembly. Additionally, Frank serves as Vice President and Board Director for The Carnegie Writers, a Nashville-based volunteer non-profit organization.

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Transcripts

Joshua Maddux:

Welcome back to in the bunker.

Joshua Maddux:

Every business owner has faced challenges and we love to share those stories.

Joshua Maddux:

Today.

Joshua Maddux:

We have Frank Schieber in the bunker with us.

Joshua Maddux:

Frank has been faced with the challenge of gaps in full-time and full-time

Joshua Maddux:

employment, and really the stigmatism that has been associated with those gaps.

Joshua Maddux:

There's so much to talk about and unpack here.

Joshua Maddux:

As both, an entrepreneur or someone who's employed, there's so many

Joshua Maddux:

elements around this stigmatism.

Joshua Maddux:

I'm super excited to jump in and chat with Frank.

Joshua Maddux:

Welcome to the show, Frank.

Frank Schieber:

Thank you, Joshua.

Frank Schieber:

I appreciate it.

Joshua Maddux:

So let's get to know you a little bit.

Joshua Maddux:

Who are you?

Joshua Maddux:

How'd you get here?

Joshua Maddux:

What are you?

Frank Schieber:

I've been in B2B marketing for more than 20 years

Frank Schieber:

now, specifically B2B technology marketing for nearly 10 years.

Frank Schieber:

My current role is senior demand generation manager, which frankly

Frank Schieber:

demand generation didn't even exist as a role until I would say

Frank Schieber:

probably the last seven years.

Frank Schieber:

pRobably sounds about right.

Frank Schieber:

As as account-based marketing was starting to become a buzz word and buzz phrase

Frank Schieber:

that was carried through companies like Terminus and others that were

Frank Schieber:

preaching the notion of being smarter about B2B marketing through better tar.

Frank Schieber:

And I'm the senior demand generation manager for a company

Frank Schieber:

called core business technologies.

Frank Schieber:

I just started that role just on just 10 days ago.

Frank Schieber:

And and I'm still learning the ribs there.

Frank Schieber:

It's a FinTech company.

Frank Schieber:

So financial technologies that will.

Frank Schieber:

But mainly payment processing and merchant services for city and

Frank Schieber:

county governments and healthcare.

Frank Schieber:

That said I've worked at a variety of different different technology

Frank Schieber:

firms everything from GPS based vehicle fleet tracking and managing.

Frank Schieber:

tO information security which include government governor GRC, which has

Frank Schieber:

governance, risk management and compliance solutions worked with a webinar

Frank Schieber:

and video collaboration technology.

Frank Schieber:

And and I just liked the, I just liked the B2B technology world a lot.

Frank Schieber:

I just think it's very fascinating.

Frank Schieber:

And I feel like I feel like I'm getting better.

Frank Schieber:

And try these different little niches of technol of marketing technology in

Frank Schieber:

terms of B2B technology, rather, but in terms of marketing, I've always wanted

Frank Schieber:

to do demand gen and try different areas and always want to try FinTech.

Frank Schieber:

And it's a nice it's a nice adventure and we're going to see how it goes.

Joshua Maddux:

Awesome.

Joshua Maddux:

Awesome.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah, it's funny.

Joshua Maddux:

As you're talking through, like some of the different roles, you've had a

Joshua Maddux:

lot of it how those industries are.

Joshua Maddux:

I would refer to as like behind the scenes stuff, like the general

Joshua Maddux:

consumer doesn't even realize, like any of that stuff exists or happens

Joshua Maddux:

or any of that type of stuff.

Joshua Maddux:

Like GPS fleet tracking, yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

Every Amazon truck and ups truck is tracked, but you don't necessarily

Joshua Maddux:

think about it until they can't find your package for three weeks.

Joshua Maddux:

So obviously we're chatting about the stigmatism around.

Joshua Maddux:

Just an employment gap.

Joshua Maddux:

In that aspect what does that look like for you?

Joshua Maddux:

What, what did that look like from, the employment you have had and those gaps?

Frank Schieber:

I'm not sure.

Frank Schieber:

The as far as as far as the employment gaps I'll be candid.

Frank Schieber:

They are.

Frank Schieber:

Occasionally terrifying.

Frank Schieber:

I prefer to work full time.

Frank Schieber:

I prefer to be productive and I am not a big fan of being

Frank Schieber:

productive and not making money.

Frank Schieber:

wHich is what often occurs in the employment and employment gaps scenario.

Frank Schieber:

I think there may be a tendency for those that are employed to

Frank Schieber:

think of an employment gap and.

Frank Schieber:

That's something where, while that person's just either taking

Frank Schieber:

vacations, doing road tripping or or or just, or sitting on their Duff,

Frank Schieber:

just drinking a can of course, light and watching baseball games and.

Frank Schieber:

The reality is that can't be further from the truth and the people that

Frank Schieber:

I have known who have gone through gone through employment gaps,

Frank Schieber:

regardless of the length of time, they're actively looking for work.

Frank Schieber:

And that is and they're in there more often than not.

Frank Schieber:

I won't say everybody because I deal in probabilities, not absolutes.

Frank Schieber:

One of my things I love about my mantra is I love this.

Frank Schieber:

It is is that most of the people that I've known who are seeking

Frank Schieber:

work, are they're pursuing it like a full-time full-time role unto itself.

Frank Schieber:

And it is challenging for sure.

Frank Schieber:

Especially doing something like what I do the role is there are

Frank Schieber:

a lot of roles out there, but you also have to kiss a lot of fraud.

Frank Schieber:

And likewise, they're going to think the same of you as well.

Frank Schieber:

It's just like dating, you, you may like a company and the company

Frank Schieber:

may like you initially, and then they may go with another candidate.

Frank Schieber:

And vice versa, a company might like you and you might be, you might just feel

Frank Schieber:

like you're not necessarily the right fit for the role due to cultural fit.

Frank Schieber:

Or or where they're at as an organization that you think might

Frank Schieber:

be limiting towards your growth.

Frank Schieber:

Those sorts of things are very real.

Frank Schieber:

And so you have to be able to, so it takes time to be able to find that right

Frank Schieber:

to find even if it's not going to be 100% fit, which there never really is.

Frank Schieber:

It takes time to find that one.

Frank Schieber:

That's going to be an 80 to 90%.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

I, as you're talking about like the aspect of.

Joshua Maddux:

People think unemployment is like all I pictures.

Joshua Maddux:

Like some guy it's the meme of what people think unemployment is.

Joshua Maddux:

And you're like skipping through a field, like I'm on vacation.

Joshua Maddux:

And then what employment, actual unemployment actually is.

Joshua Maddux:

It's like pulling your hair out and trying to figure out, how

Joshua Maddux:

are you affording lunch tomorrow?

Joshua Maddux:

And yeah, I think that's a huge stress, both for people who are looking for a

Joshua Maddux:

full-time job, but also entrepreneur, maybe it's someone who is a contractor and

Joshua Maddux:

they're trying to figure out where their next renovation project is coming from.

Joshua Maddux:

Or, there's so many different elements and not just full-time and full-time

Joshua Maddux:

employment, but I think also, people who own their own business

Joshua Maddux:

as well are facing that same issue.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

The aspect of trying to understand that not every job that's posted

Joshua Maddux:

is going to be a good fit.

Joshua Maddux:

So many people don't realize that they're like, oh, I'll just apply for,

Joshua Maddux:

two or three and I'll get one of them.

Joshua Maddux:

And it's you should apply for 40 or 50 and find the ones that are a good fit.

Joshua Maddux:

Find the one that is.

Joshua Maddux:

That job that you want to be there for the next five years, not something that

Joshua Maddux:

you are going to regret in 90 days.

Joshua Maddux:

Because then you're going to be back at square one and

Joshua Maddux:

trying to figure this all out.

Joshua Maddux:

It's

Frank Schieber:

the other thing is too, and this is something that's worth

Frank Schieber:

mentioning is, and this is just a cold, hard reality is as much as careerist

Frank Schieber:

as we want to be about our profession, about our work, our profession, if

Frank Schieber:

you're really serious about being a serious professional in your career

Frank Schieber:

and, life can and will get in the way.

Frank Schieber:

We all have to eat and.

Frank Schieber:

And there's times when you may want to find a, if you're having a tough time

Frank Schieber:

finding finding a job, whether it's the.

Frank Schieber:

For whatever crazy reason.

Frank Schieber:

There's there should be no no harm, no foul.

Frank Schieber:

If you take a job at a supermarket or a fast food restaurant

Frank Schieber:

or whatever, it may be.

Frank Schieber:

Just to pay the bills till you find that role that that you want, that is that

Frank Schieber:

is worth spot, that is worth binding.

Frank Schieber:

And conversely, it shouldn't be frowned upon if you are doing that sort of

Frank Schieber:

thing, because you're trying to make your you're just trying to survive.

Frank Schieber:

You're trying to, perhaps even not only for yourself, but also.

Frank Schieber:

Take care of others.

Frank Schieber:

It's a work on work unto itself is its own reward in terms of being able

Frank Schieber:

to engage with others to be able to gather some life experiences, to be

Frank Schieber:

able to gain new skills and apply them wherever you go, it shouldn't

Frank Schieber:

be it shouldn't be held against you.

Frank Schieber:

I recently heard a couple of folks on this marketing technology, marketing,

Frank Schieber:

social, a group that I belong to, and they're like some of the best people we

Frank Schieber:

buy have her hired wood were just, they were wait, they were waiters or they were.

Frank Schieber:

Bellhops and they were just looking to get there just to get a break.

Frank Schieber:

And then they got a break and there, they finally get the brick and they crushed

Frank Schieber:

their jobs in coding or engineering or product marketing or whatever it is

Frank Schieber:

because they're there, they're hungry.

Frank Schieber:

They want to do the best job they can.

Frank Schieber:

And they just need someone to give them a shot.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

Yep.

Joshua Maddux:

Absolutely.

Joshua Maddux:

I actually have a friend who's a business owner and.

Joshua Maddux:

Has talked about getting a chance to people who work.

Joshua Maddux:

And he's these are people who, if you want someone for like sales or even

Joshua Maddux:

like project management, you get one guy who's running a bar and he's keeping

Joshua Maddux:

track of 30 or 40 different people.

Joshua Maddux:

What drinks they're having.

Joshua Maddux:

Who's where, as people switch tables or spots at the bar to

Joshua Maddux:

keep those tabs open and make sure that, they all get closed out.

Joshua Maddux:

So it doesn't come out of his check at the end of the day.

Joshua Maddux:

He's building relationships.

Joshua Maddux:

That person is working at the bar.

Joshua Maddux:

They're building relationships with every customer who comes in, remembering

Joshua Maddux:

who they are, all that type of stuff.

Joshua Maddux:

Cause that means some guy walks in.

Joshua Maddux:

You remember the dude's name and what he likes to.

Joshua Maddux:

That may mean, double a tip.

Joshua Maddux:

And that's not a bad thing.

Joshua Maddux:

And so those are the types of things that those are so many soft

Joshua Maddux:

skill elements that employers don't necessarily put down on a resume.

Joshua Maddux:

But I think that are super beneficial to anybody who is hiring.

Joshua Maddux:

And it's not a bad thing to.

Joshua Maddux:

To utilize find those skills that, the business needs to fill and find

Joshua Maddux:

them maybe in a different industry.

Joshua Maddux:

And then cross.

Frank Schieber:

Absolutely.

Frank Schieber:

There's an old adage.

Frank Schieber:

That's be nice to the janitor because the janitor knows more about

Frank Schieber:

the business than anybody else.

Frank Schieber:

And granted, I don't get to deal with janitors in my current office right now

Frank Schieber:

knowing, because I'm working from home.

Frank Schieber:

I think people in in my profession in 2022 I think the principle behind

Frank Schieber:

that still still serves well, do not underestimate anybody for the role that

Frank Schieber:

they're currently playing because that person that you may be underestimating

Frank Schieber:

Right now may be the person that that could be that a few years now

Frank Schieber:

it could be doing incredible things.

Frank Schieber:

Look at Tyler Perry for goodness sakes, and the guy was sleeping in his car.

Frank Schieber:

And now, now he knows like a film studio in Georgia is hundreds of millions

Frank Schieber:

of dollars each just never know.

Frank Schieber:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

For sure.

Joshua Maddux:

I think that lines up with the aspect of, what we're talking about is.

Joshua Maddux:

You know that gap in employment like that gap might be the

Joshua Maddux:

break might need and break.

Joshua Maddux:

As in stepping away from work, it might be the ability for that person to clear their

Joshua Maddux:

head, have a sense of where am I going?

Joshua Maddux:

Is that the career path you want?

Joshua Maddux:

Whether it's to change career paths or change education paths or

Joshua Maddux:

whatever that might be, that gap is not necessarily always a bad thing.

Joshua Maddux:

And

Frank Schieber:

so I happen to agree all in I had a gap between in fact it

Frank Schieber:

was my second serious gap in employment, and that was between between April.

Frank Schieber:

And I can say, I should clarify between full-time employment.

Frank Schieber:

I was doing some contract work between April of 2016, through June of 2019, I

Frank Schieber:

was able to find a handful of contract gigs with arthritis foundation,

Frank Schieber:

which was a fabulous role rent half a company that's no longer in existence

Frank Schieber:

called see me, they got sold to DXC.

Frank Schieber:

The and then I had a couple of other minor companies.

Frank Schieber:

I helped out as well startups.

Frank Schieber:

And but during that time it was I hit it.

Frank Schieber:

I hit a proverbial cross records.

Frank Schieber:

I didn't know if.

Frank Schieber:

Any more road for me in the marketing profession time, the

Frank Schieber:

diet, the times were changing.

Frank Schieber:

The dynamics was changing.

Frank Schieber:

The technology was changing.

Frank Schieber:

The demographic makeup of the profession was changing.

Frank Schieber:

I wasn't too sure.

Frank Schieber:

I was having a tough time finding it was interviewing with companies that wanted to

Frank Schieber:

interview with and not landing the jobs.

Frank Schieber:

I was really unsure about which way things were going.

Frank Schieber:

So I made it a point to take a step back and go, okay.

Frank Schieber:

I think I'm going to, I'm going to just take a bit of a

Frank Schieber:

sabbatical and studying something.

Frank Schieber:

And I decided to study something that was going, that I felt knew was going to be

Frank Schieber:

that was going to be a growing profession.

Frank Schieber:

And that if I entered that profession, that I could make

Frank Schieber:

some serious coin doing that.

Frank Schieber:

And if I did enter that profession, that.

Frank Schieber:

Augment what I already do very well.

Frank Schieber:

And so I started studying data analytics in June of 2017

Frank Schieber:

and through August of 2017.

Frank Schieber:

And then I enjoyed that enough to be able to, because I wanted to get

Frank Schieber:

into data science and I was like going, okay, what's, let's make sure

Frank Schieber:

that we're not taking any shortcuts here and I'm glad I took that.

Frank Schieber:

And I passed the exam to get into the data science program at at a digital

Frank Schieber:

education from general assembly.

Frank Schieber:

And then September through December I 40 at, I did their bootcamp 40 hours

Frank Schieber:

plus per week was really more like 50 to 60 hours of studying data science.

Frank Schieber:

And not in doing nothing, but for that period of time.

Frank Schieber:

And I did get a techno, I did get an instructor assistant job that spring.

Frank Schieber:

But afterwards I wasn't able to lead to data science job, but

Frank Schieber:

during that time, I was able to land a couple marketing contracts

Frank Schieber:

and and Y a bound that over time.

Frank Schieber:

I get so many people, particularly interviewer, particularly those in,

Frank Schieber:

co-workers and that sort of thing they've seen by data science and data analytics

Frank Schieber:

experience, and it's really paid off because I tend to be able to do some

Frank Schieber:

things that and think in ways that.

Frank Schieber:

Many markers tend not to think.

Frank Schieber:

And so that, especially in doing demand generation, which again, that was,

Frank Schieber:

that didn't even exist a few years ago.

Frank Schieber:

And I wound up as a senior demand generation manager role at

Frank Schieber:

the, after my sabbatical ended.

Frank Schieber:

I'm doing it again now.

Frank Schieber:

And and it's enabled me with some skills that many, my peers just.

Frank Schieber:

Don't have or ways they think about, or that they don't

Frank Schieber:

necessarily think about things.

Frank Schieber:

It's really given me that opportunity to be able to drill down

Frank Schieber:

thinking and think on those terms.

Joshua Maddux:

That's cool.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah, really.

Joshua Maddux:

It's, so utilizing those gaps and those opportunities to step

Joshua Maddux:

away to reevaluate reassess.

Joshua Maddux:

Re-educate and then reenter.

Joshua Maddux:

And I think that's really where, we look at, as we enter a new year, we look

Joshua Maddux:

at what is your new year's resolution and how are you going to change?

Joshua Maddux:

But oftentimes we don't necessarily look at the same thing from a career path.

Joshua Maddux:

And I was mentioning before we hit record, we were talking about

Joshua Maddux:

entrepreneurship and how oftentimes entrepreneurs will start a business and

Joshua Maddux:

they'll get, maybe it's just an idea and they haven't launched something yet.

Joshua Maddux:

Then they decided to change directions before they launch, or they do launch

Joshua Maddux:

a business and it's been running for a year or two and they shift direction.

Joshua Maddux:

Oftentimes people will look at it and they're like why did you change?

Joshua Maddux:

Why did you change that up?

Joshua Maddux:

Why did you?

Joshua Maddux:

And it's cause we learned new things.

Joshua Maddux:

Like we learned that the market we were going after is, wants to pay us $5 for a

Joshua Maddux:

$50 product or, whatever that might be.

Joshua Maddux:

We found another underserved market.

Joshua Maddux:

Where you had someone on the podcast recently, who they found a market.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

They're like the closest business that does, this is over a hundred miles away.

Joshua Maddux:

There's no one in our area.

Joshua Maddux:

And they're like, we've got a captive audience.

Joshua Maddux:

Let's start a business that will do this in this city.

Joshua Maddux:

And they had been running now for a few years and they've been doing really well.

Joshua Maddux:

It's understanding that market and where the skill sets needed.

Joshua Maddux:

And I think, looking at the skill set that you shifted towards and

Joshua Maddux:

learn more about, it's a more for lack of a better term, like a more

Joshua Maddux:

desirable and marketable skillset.

Joshua Maddux:

And.

Joshua Maddux:

Now, some of your peers are looking into you of Hey, you've got these skills.

Joshua Maddux:

And I don't like, how can I get that type thing?

Joshua Maddux:

And I think that's, that's really where it's continuing to educate yourself.

Joshua Maddux:

Whether it's between jobs or educating yourself on the side, will, that could

Joshua Maddux:

be a part-time job is just continued education, especially in today's day

Joshua Maddux:

and age of digital accessibility.

Joshua Maddux:

Online college classes on websites now for free.

Joshua Maddux:

They're not credited, it can be a free class that you take

Joshua Maddux:

just to learn and continue to.

Frank Schieber:

Absolutely.

Frank Schieber:

And and while I at the job I'm at now, there's a, I have an opportunity to be

Frank Schieber:

able to do a little bit of continuing education, which I'm absolutely going to

Frank Schieber:

take advantage of for my own for my own Professional Mo from my own marketing

Frank Schieber:

professional marketing growth four get certified in some marketing automation,

Frank Schieber:

which is something I've wanted to do.

Frank Schieber:

But the the I'm just taking an hour, plus I already can pick it

Frank Schieber:

up, put it on the calendar today.

Frank Schieber:

I'm taking an hour each weekday just to be able to just to be

Frank Schieber:

able to sit down and focus on.

Frank Schieber:

And do not ending nothing, but knowing that it's going to ultimately serve my

Frank Schieber:

my employer very well and be able to do and be able to do more easier, quicker,

Frank Schieber:

better, harder, faster, stronger.

Frank Schieber:

And so I think that's really I think that is a really if you've got

Frank Schieber:

any opportunity to be able to get educated, you should be able to do it.

Frank Schieber:

It's education is being educated is not a crime that's that's for certain.

Frank Schieber:

And I think that sometimes I think, I really think that education gets in

Frank Schieber:

the, in, in the business world nowadays tends to get a little bit of a a

Frank Schieber:

little bit of short sticks, so to speak ultimately skills experiences, what

Frank Schieber:

really counts, but you still need to get educated on the skills on those skills.

Frank Schieber:

There's a lot of times these businesses are just not gonna do it for you.

Frank Schieber:

You've got to go and do it, and they're not going to cater to you to do that.

Frank Schieber:

Then you've got do it on your own and it got to get it.

Frank Schieber:

You got to get any way you can.

Frank Schieber:

Yeah, for

Joshua Maddux:

sure.

Joshua Maddux:

As we're wrapping up.

Joshua Maddux:

What is your sort of key takeaway from all this, someone who is either a,

Joshua Maddux:

between jobs or maybe they're looking to start a business or they are, trying

Joshua Maddux:

to assess this, what is that key element that you would give as a piece of advice?

Frank Schieber:

It's a couple items.

Frank Schieber:

One define yourself and how you yourself relate to that, to the

Frank Schieber:

industry and profession that you want to be in that I think is critical.

Frank Schieber:

Making sure there's key words and key phrases.

Frank Schieber:

And that data centric approach is in the is in your resume,

Frank Schieber:

I think is a vital thing.

Frank Schieber:

I also think that that really really be really.

Frank Schieber:

Knowing who you are knowing really knowing what your role is and who you're going

Frank Schieber:

to be reporting to who you going to be reporting to and what the company is.

Frank Schieber:

I think that sort of thing really counts.

Frank Schieber:

I'm making, I always make it a point that whenever I send it resume, I have

Frank Schieber:

that a cover letter goes right with it.

Frank Schieber:

And it's always addressed to the person who if I can't figure out exactly who

Frank Schieber:

that person is, I would be reporting to that I've got who I think it would be.

Frank Schieber:

It's not somebody higher up.

Frank Schieber:

So that has served me well, too.

Frank Schieber:

I think more than anything else though.

Frank Schieber:

And this is going to sound really corny, but it's so underrated by

Frank Schieber:

employers, by candidates, more than anything else is to get, to gather

Frank Schieber:

your professional references and recommendations, LinkedIn recommendations

Frank Schieber:

and professional references.

Frank Schieber:

Really Amman.

Frank Schieber:

Matter more than anything else that you can possibly have on your resume.

Frank Schieber:

It is it is, that is the verification as to how well you have actually

Frank Schieber:

performed in your career.

Frank Schieber:

It is, and make sure that those references are really good ones, not Hey dad, can

Frank Schieber:

you write something for me that in.

Frank Schieber:

Make sure that colleagues make sure it's supervisors make sure it's clients

Frank Schieber:

the occasional vendor who you worked closely with those sorts of things re or

Frank Schieber:

collaborator those things really count.

Frank Schieber:

And that really that's more evidence than anything of the work that

Frank Schieber:

you've done and how well you've done and how you've lifted the.

Frank Schieber:

The org, the organization or your department or your

Frank Schieber:

clients, all that really.

Frank Schieber:

I think more than anything else make that happen.

Frank Schieber:

My I'm making a point that with my professional reference list is cloth

Frank Schieber:

people deep, and it can go even deeper than that, which is way more than an

Frank Schieber:

in-store spending recruiter or talent acquisition, professional launch.

Frank Schieber:

And that's the idea is.

Frank Schieber:

It is to share that.

Frank Schieber:

And they're all legit.

Frank Schieber:

And the professional recommendations, they're all legit.

Frank Schieber:

And it's I'm like 39 or 40 deep now on LinkedIn.

Frank Schieber:

That's just, it's ridiculous.

Frank Schieber:

Is that wrong, techno?

Frank Schieber:

It's the one time where I think quantity and quality really matter

Frank Schieber:

is in those recommendations.

Frank Schieber:

So I recommend.

Frank Schieber:

I Recommend those particular items.

Frank Schieber:

And by all means also surmount when during the tough times when you're

Frank Schieber:

unemployed surround yourself with family, friends, and loved ones, your support

Frank Schieber:

system is everything and commit and can genuinely make the difference between

Frank Schieber:

life and death during during those unemployment during this employment gap.

Frank Schieber:

There's times of unemployment or whichever you call, I think it's all equal.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah, that's good.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

I like some of those, I know the aspect of knowing and knowing the company

Joshua Maddux:

that you're applying to and just understanding what the heck they do

Joshua Maddux:

or who the manager is, the roles you can't tell you just understanding what

Joshua Maddux:

they do and what industry they're in.

Joshua Maddux:

If you don't get that right.

Joshua Maddux:

They're not even taking a second glance at your resume.

Joshua Maddux:

It doesn't matter how good you all are.

Joshua Maddux:

You may be asking for the lowest salary and have the best education,

Joshua Maddux:

but they won't care if you have no idea what the heck they do.

Joshua Maddux:

That's really good.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

It's really good.

Joshua Maddux:

Absolutely.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

References the recommendations.

Joshua Maddux:

It's like getting reviews for restaurants, the same thing, I see reviews on products

Joshua Maddux:

or restaurants and like great service.

Joshua Maddux:

For what a dentist, the restaurant, the mechanic, like it's the quality of it.

Joshua Maddux:

It's really key.

Joshua Maddux:

It's good.

Joshua Maddux:

Absolutely.

Frank Schieber:

Absolutely.

Frank Schieber:

And sometimes there's moments make the, it's the it's in the details.

Frank Schieber:

There's little moments

Joshua Maddux:

to make a difference.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah, absolutely.

Joshua Maddux:

Absolutely.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah.

Joshua Maddux:

Awesome.

Joshua Maddux:

I appreciate having you on the show and appreciate your time.

Joshua Maddux:

I know there's a bunch of nuggets.

Joshua Maddux:

For me, I got out of this and hope listeners will as well.

Joshua Maddux:

in The show notes will be your bio and link to your website and

Joshua Maddux:

your LinkedIn and everything else.

Joshua Maddux:

If people do want to connect with you, what is that sort

Joshua Maddux:

of best spot for them to read?

Frank Schieber:

That's the best way professionally is through LinkedIn.

Frank Schieber:

I I'm actually a little fun fact here, Joshua and I'm actually one of the first

Frank Schieber:

million users of LinkedIn and and have been a big believer in it for a long time.

Frank Schieber:

Now it is definitely.

Frank Schieber:

Is it perfect?

Frank Schieber:

No, but I tell you what one heck of a power Rolodex and it's.

Frank Schieber:

It is and for doing jobs search, it is absolutely fundamental.

Frank Schieber:

So I think I'm I, that's the best way to reach me for sure.

Joshua Maddux:

Awesome.

Joshua Maddux:

That will be, like I said, in the show notes.

Joshua Maddux:

So for those who do want to connect with you, I will be able to do and

Joshua Maddux:

again, appreciate having you on and

Frank Schieber:

tell him, I think they should also mention

Frank Schieber:

that I interviewed with you.

Frank Schieber:

That way I know.

Joshua Maddux:

Yep.

Joshua Maddux:

Yeah, exactly.

Joshua Maddux:

Exactly.

Joshua Maddux:

I mentioned the podcast if you want to connect with Frank and awesome.

Joshua Maddux:

Appreciate the time, like I said, and we'll go.

Frank Schieber:

Absolutely.

Frank Schieber:

Thanks again, Joshua.

Frank Schieber:

I appreciate it.

Frank Schieber:

I really enjoyed our conversation.

Frank Schieber:

It was great.

Frank Schieber:

Have anyone like what.

Joshua Maddux:

Thanks for listening to this episode of, in the bunker.

Joshua Maddux:

As always we can be found on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter

Joshua Maddux:

at, in the bunker podcast.

Joshua Maddux:

Be sure to share this episode and what you're going to apply from it.

Joshua Maddux:

And how that can affect your business, make sure to tag us in that post so

Joshua Maddux:

we can highlight your journey as well.

Joshua Maddux:

But before you go.

Joshua Maddux:

I have a quick personal ask.

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