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#98 LinkedIn Strategies for Women over 40 - Empowering, Confidence and High-Value Networking
Episode 9822nd January 2024 • Jonny Ross Fractional CMO • Jonny Ross
00:00:00 00:32:28

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Host: Jonny Ross

Guest: Karen Yankovich

Episode Overview:

In this insightful episode, Jonny Ross is joined by LinkedIn expert Karen Yankovich to discuss the unique challenges and opportunities for women over 40 in the world of digital branding and networking. Karen shares her expert strategies on how women can leverage LinkedIn to enhance their professional presence, build high-value networks, and step confidently into their roles in the business world.

Key Topics Discussed:

Why Focus on Women Over 40:

  • Understanding the need for distinct strategies for women over 40 in digital marketing and personal branding.


LinkedIn Mastery:

  • Karen's top tips for optimising LinkedIn profiles.
  • Strategies for expanding professional networks on LinkedIn.


Overcoming Imposter Syndrome:

  • Addressing common challenges faced by women over 40.
  • Building confidence and overcoming imposter syndrome.


Building High-Value Networks:

  • Karen's insights on relationship building on LinkedIn.
  • Leveraging LinkedIn for high-ticket opportunities.


Mindset and Confidence Building:

  • The importance of mindset in professional success.
  • Techniques for stepping into a powerful and confident professional identity.


Resources and Links:

  • https://www.linkedin.com/in/karenyankovich/
  • https://karenyankovich.com/
  • Take the Quiz: https://karenyankovich.com/quiz/
  • https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/good-girls-get-rich-podcast/id1308227233

Connect with Us:

  • https://podcast.jonnyross.com/
  • https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonnyross/

Final Thoughts:

Karen's expertise and passion for empowering women shine throughout the episode, offering listeners practical advice, relatable insights, and motivation to take their professional presence to the next level. Tune in to gain valuable knowledge on mastering LinkedIn, embracing your expertise, and building a network that aligns with your career goals.


Timestamps

Women over 40 (00:00:11)

Karen Yankovic explains why women over 40 need distinct strategies on LinkedIn and how they can harness the platform to amplify their professional presence.


Podcast and Mindset (00:02:39)

Karen discusses her podcast, "Good Girls Get Rich," and the mindset component in building a successful digital presence.


Misconceptions about LinkedIn (00:03:27)

Karen addresses the misconceptions about LinkedIn, such as it being too corporate and full of spam, and explains the platform's potential for relationship building.


Imposter Syndrome (00:10:44)

Karen delves into imposter syndrome, its impact on women over 40, and strategies for overcoming it.


LinkedIn Strategies (00:14:32)

Karen outlines the importance of providing value and building relationships on LinkedIn, using examples of successful outreach efforts.


The importance of intentional connections (00:19:07)

Emphasizing the need for intentional, meaningful connections at conferences and through white papers to create opportunities.


Standing out at conferences (00:21:23)

Discussing strategies for standing out at conferences, such as connecting with speakers and utilizing LinkedIn to reach potential clients.


Optimizing LinkedIn profile (00:23:14)

Exploring the significance of positioning LinkedIn profiles as personal brands rather than traditional resumes, and the importance of the "About" section.


Utilizing LinkedIn creator mode (00:25:18)

Explaining the benefits of using LinkedIn creator mode for showcasing content and positioning oneself as a thought leader.


Effective LinkedIn posting frequency (00:26:06)

Addressing the optimal posting frequency on LinkedIn and the importance of consistent content to stay top of mind.


Building relationships with journalists (00:28:09)

Highlighting the value of engaging with journalists on social media and the impact of sharing and tagging their content.


Empowering mindset and resources (00:30:08)

Promoting a free assessment and resources to help individuals understand their strengths and develop a confident mindset for success on LinkedIn.

Transcripts

Jonny Ross:

Hello and welcome to our latest episode, where we're diving into the dynamic world of LinkedIn and digital branding for women over 40. I'm thrilled to have Karen Jankovic with us today, a renowned LinkedIn strategist and a champion for women's empowerment in the digital space, in today's conversation will uncover why women over 40 need distinct strategies on LinkedIn and how they can harness this platform to amplify their professional presence. Whether you're looking to revamp your digital identity or seeking tips to enhance your online influence, this episode is packed with insights tailored just for you. Let's get started and learn from the expertise of the LinkedIn Queen herself, Karen Yankovic. Welcome to the show, Johnny.

Karen Yankovich:

Thank you so much for having me here. My favorite topic.

Jonny Ross:

It's an absolute pleasure. One of the things that I wanted to sort of dive into really quickly is, why are we focusing on women and over the age of 40? Because surely this is the same strategies, the same techniques for anyone trying to build a brand, trying to break a break through brand awareness.

Jonny Ross:

Why are we focusing on women over 40?

Karen Yankovich:

Well, it's true that it is. The strategies are very similar then, and I don't particularly care what your body parts are or how you identify when, when when we bring you into my programs or my podcast. But I think that as women, um, as you know, every decade that goes by, we, we sometimes we find ourselves reinventing ourselves. Right? And we bring all this expertise to this next chapter and maybe also a little imposter syndrome, because we've never been this person before. So for me, I think women need to feel more included. I'm not really excluding men or even younger women. I really want more women to feel more included. Using the strategies that I teach LinkedIn and PR, the solid relationship building strategies. Who are the people you need to have on your calendar? Not how many eyes you're getting on a post, right? Who's on your calendar? I think women need to feel more included in this and more confident around this.

Karen Yankovich:

And as much as I love to talk to people about, especially women about the strategies around all of this, there's a huge mindset component to this too. We really need to elevate our, our our vibe to to kind of show up in the way that we want to show up in the world. So that's where that's why I put my focus there. I think that's, you know, I just think personally that when more women have more money, things change in the world. So that's my goal.

Jonny Ross:

I like that, I like that a lot.

Jonny Ross:

Um, so you have your own podcast as well? Uh, tell us about that.

Karen Yankovich:

Yeah. So my podcast is called Good Girls Get Rich. And the name of the podcast, really the, the, the story behind the name really is, you know, so many women feel that because I'm really good at this, I, I can't charge for it. Everybody can do this, which is not true. I want you to, like, clearly identify what you're good at.

Karen Yankovich:

Be really, you know, like like do what you love doing and then build your business from there. And that's where the abundance comes in. When we are solid in knowing what our comfort zone is and where our zone of genius is, and then expand from there, we can do we can do that. And somehow sometimes we think it has to be hard. It doesn't have to be hard. We can be doing what we love to do, and that's where we bring more abundance into the world, into our world.

Jonny Ross:

So in terms of, um, LinkedIn as a platform, what's the what do you think the misconception, you know, you obviously spend a lot of time with, uh, women over the age of 40. What's typically the misconception about LinkedIn?

Karen Yankovich:

You know, that it is corporate. It's too left brained that it you know, it's not for me and or even even more prevalent now is it's all full of spam, right? It's just full of spam. It's just all all people do on LinkedIn is spam.

Karen Yankovich:

And the reality is, you know, all of that can be true. And there can be other things that are true, which is, you know, yeah, it is more corporate. But here's the deal. That's where everybody there is a buyer, there's a the the average income level is higher on LinkedIn. You don't have to worry about talking a business like you do on your Facebook page or on other platforms. It's all business, right? We're it's okay to talk about your business and what you do. Um, you know, is it full of spam? Sure. But it's also I refer to LinkedIn as my money tree. And if I like, didn't those the spam is the weeds, right? Just pull them out, discard them and water your money tree. Do some outreach. Like just build relationships. Don't abandon your money tree because there's a couple of weeds.

Jonny Ross:

Well, I mean, interestingly, I get 30% of my business from LinkedIn, so I fully get what you're saying.

Jonny Ross:

Uh, what's the what? You know, so, so for someone that perhaps doesn't feel comfortable with LinkedIn, um, but sort of knows that they should be doing something, where should they be starting then? And what's the things that they should be considering. Yeah.

Karen Yankovich:

Well, you know, first of all, I just want to remind you that. On LinkedIn. We want to be thinking about our biggest ticket opportunities. You know, I went to a networking meeting, a women's and business networking meeting a couple months ago, and it was people I knew, some of the people in the meeting, I had previously lived in this area and just recently moved back, so I'm like, I'm going to go to this meeting. I'll know some people. And when they went around the room and asked everybody, how can we support you? One after another, after another, they said, well, I am a coach and I want a coaching client, or I sell pens. Who do you know that needs a pen? Every single woman said the same thing.

Karen Yankovich:

And what I want to hear them saying is I sell pens. Who do you know that has a chain of stationery stores that might need a thousand of my pens, right. That's what we use LinkedIn for. So. So remember that you're not going on LinkedIn to sell one pen at a time. You're looking for your biggest ticket opportunities. And then who are the people you need to have on your calendar to to land those contracts. And that is very simply what you where LinkedIn shines. It's not about spamming people. It's not about trying to get people to, you know, like just constantly buy your stuff. It's about having conversations like, here's what I do. Who do you know? Write collaborative conversations, meeting partners that might be able to introduce you to ten people or 20 people and building actual relationships. You know, the the I think when we when the world went virtual, um, a few years ago, it got so noisy and we were all like, scrambling. How do you out noise.

Karen Yankovich:

The noise. Right. How do you get your stuff at the in front of eyes? And what I think happened was people just started shutting it down. Nobody's seeing it anymore. Where the where business is happening now is in this relationship space, at least from what I can see. Um, or I should say it is still happening there, right? It's still people buy from other people. And if you think about who you need to talk to to sell your highest ticket opportunities and then have a strategy on LinkedIn to fill your calendar for those people, you are going to have a profitable business.

Jonny Ross:

Well, you mentioned fill your calendar a few times. You're talking about using LinkedIn to ultimately book perhaps virtual coffees or face to face coffees, or that's the sort of thing you're talking. Yeah, that's exactly right.

Karen Yankovich:

And it's not necessarily like I like to I like there to be when I'm when I am working with people on relationship building on LinkedIn to build it in a more robust way. There's three categories of relationships that I want to see you building.

Karen Yankovich:

One, of course, might be who who's interested in your stuff. Right. Of course, we want to build relationships with people that might be potential clients for us, but that's not really where I focus. I like the other two categories. That's where the the wealth building comes from, the other two categories, the middle category being who else serves that audience right? Who else serves that audience? And having those collaboration conversations, you know, um, maybe they'll send out an email for you or they'll put you on a LinkedIn live or and introduce you to their audience. You get to you get to borrow their credibility a little bit. And it doesn't have to be in massive numbers, right? It doesn't. You're not you're not really looking for like Tony Robbins to feature you, even sometimes the smaller ones, if they can fill a room full of eight people, but they have credibility with those eight people, you might walk away with two clients, right? So so thinking about that, who's that? Who else has an audience of people that serves similar, that are similar to the audience that you want to reach? And then the third category, and this is the category that everybody overlooks and that are journalists who are the journalists and the podcast host and the bloggers that write about the things that you're expert in, and are you building relationships with them, that the credibility that that you get when you're, you know, things like this conversation right here, there might be somebody watching today that know you, Johnny, but don't know me.

Karen Yankovich:

And they're like, well, Johnny thinks she's worthy of my time. Let me check her out. If I met that same person, you know, at a grocery store, they wouldn't have any need to any reason to to check me out any further. Right. So when you fill your network full of the kinds of people that can help you build credibility, things change fast and and that imposter syndrome, we talked a little bit about that. This helps with that too, because now you're getting seen as an expert. You're building your thought leader platform legitimately, not just by cranking out tons and tons of content and exhausting yourself with posts. You're legitimately building your thought leader platform. Um, and it and it's just a it's it sounds like a lot, but if you just narrow it down and say, what if I have 3 or 5 calls on my calendar each week with a few people at each of those categories, your business is going to skyrocket. It can be done in a simple way. It doesn't have to be complicated.

Jonny Ross:

So.

Jonny Ross:

So I want to get into how you're going to actually get 3 or 5 calendar appointments a week. Um, I also want to talk about imposter syndrome a tiny bit more. I should just, uh, remind people about watching or listening. Thank you for being here. By the way. Uh, this is the Johnny Ross Fractional CMO podcast. Uh, we are live right now, but you might be listening on the podcast, too. Thank you very much indeed. If you got any comments you want to ask. Can't anything please do. We can either answer live or we can answer afterwards. But it's brilliantly here. So thank you. The now, the imposter syndrome. Uh, it's quite common. Uh, in. Well, I know even with men as well, but particularly with women over 40, 50, even 60 even, they've got a wealth of experience. But perhaps they've, you know, they've they've been, uh, taken some time out, uh, spent it with the family and then decided to come back into work.

Jonny Ross:

Tell me more about, uh, how they feel and and how they overcome how they should overcome imposter syndrome.

Karen Yankovich:

Yeah.

Karen Yankovich:

Well, you know, I mean, I would I would imagine there's very few people listening to this right now that can't relate to this. You're watching something on TV and there's an expert up there talking, and you're like, that person's an idiot. Like, I know so much more than they know, right? Like, I can be doing that. Why am I not doing that? Right? I know that that's happened to probably everybody that's listening right now at least one time. Um, they're there because they went after it, right? They nobody's knocked on their door and said, hey, come be on my TV show. Right? So, so. It's a very, you know, I incorporate mindset into every single thing I do. And I don't incorporate mindset because and I love identity work. Right. But you're, you're you're stepping into a new identity. If you've been if you were like, if you had a job, you know, with one title and then you, you know, maybe you took a little bit of a break to be with your kids, or maybe you decided to leave corporate and you're going into out on your own as a consultant.

Karen Yankovich:

You've never been that person before. How could you possibly know how to do it confidently, right? Like so. So cut yourself a little bit of a break. Understand that the the reason people like me build mindset and identity, work into the work that they do, is because it's it. We all need it. We all need it. When you go from a $100,000 a year business owner to a quarter million dollar a year business owner, that's a new identity. There's more work that needs to be done, you know? And if I'm saying to you, I want you to show up as if your peers with the most influential people in your industry, and I want you to get them on your calendar. You know, you're going to be like, what? Why would they want to talk to me? Why wouldn't they want to talk to you? You know, there was a conversation recently in a Facebook group that I've been in a really long time, and it was somebody had reached out to somebody on LinkedIn, and it was somebody very prestigious that reached out and was like, this person reached out, what should I do? And everybody said, oh, it's probably just a dialer.

Karen Yankovich:

It's probably an auto dialer. Just ignore them. I was like, hell no, I don't want you to ignore it. I want you to step into that. I want you to reach out and say, so nice to meet you. I'm a fan of your work. I, you know, it's feel great to be connected here. I'd love to know more like dive in, use that as the they started the conversation. Right. But we're so we're so our immediate reaction is so well they must not have really meant that. Right. And I want you to be like, well, what if they did right. And that's where that's where the the success starts to happen. When you start to say, what's the worst thing that can happen? Maybe they never respond to you, right? Maybe they ignore you. Maybe it was a auto, you know, an auto thing and they never respond to you. So what? Right. But maybe the next person will, and maybe it's the universe kind of opening up these doors for you.

Karen Yankovich:

So so imposter syndrome is just systemic. We can either just shrink into the corner or we can say, all right, let me give it a shot. Right. So so I think we need to do it together. And I, you know, everything that I do has a like a community component or a really heavy support component because I think that, you know, sometimes you need somebody behind you going, give it a shot, right. Why not? Um, that's who I want you to surround yourself with. And that's, you know, that's what you can you and that's a choice you get to make. Right? So it's okay to have imposter syndrome. I believe everybody probably has some level of imposter syndrome. If you don't, you know that that's somebody that I would stay away from more than somebody that is a little afraid to, you know, has it takes a little courage to take that next step.

Jonny Ross:

So you talked about, uh, three types of audiences on LinkedIn. You've got the people that you sort of directly want to sell to you.

Jonny Ross:

You've got the people that are already selling to those people, and you've got the whole PR opportunity of building that credibility through, um, uh, as you said, LinkedIn lives or, uh, podcasts or blogs or articles or the media, all sorts of different things. How, what what's the sort of steps that someone should be taking in terms of, um, how to use LinkedIn? What are the strategies that they should be using? Yeah, right at the beginning. What what are the things you should be doing.

Karen Yankovich:

So first of all, there's almost never almost never a reason for it to be cold outreach. Never a reason to be cold outreach. You know, I I'm thinking as you were talking about, that I'm thinking of a client that I have that's a real estate agent, um, on the West coast of the United States and has a great links because, by the way, this works best when you take the time to do a great LinkedIn profile. You need to look worthy of these people's time, right? And that's on you.

Karen Yankovich:

So you have to have a and and nobody really cares that you're the CEO. They you know, they want to know what's in it for them. So you want to have a profile that kind of really positions you as that thought leader. Right. So so this client of mine, um, in real estate, saw an article that was written on NBC News.com about real estate. So instead of just sharing the article and talking about the article they shared the article, talked about the article and tagged the journalist and connected with the journalist. Right. And said, you know, hey Mary, just saw your article. Love what you're talking about. This this is not enough. People are talking about that. I'd love to be connected to you here on LinkedIn. And you might. You're going to see I tagged you all over the place on this article. Right. So provided value. So was this a cold outreach? Absolutely. Mary had no idea who my client was, but my client provided value right to her by saying, hey, I'm going to share this article.

Karen Yankovich:

What journalist? I mean, you have a podcast. Do you wake up every morning with people sharing it and tagging you all over the place? Like, I wish that happened, right? We remember when that.

Jonny Ross:

If only Karen. If only that we remember.

Karen Yankovich:

When that happens. So so of course the journalists thank them and and a week later reached out and said, hey, I'm writing another article. Can I ask you a few questions? Because remember, they looked great. They had a great profile turn into a full page article on NBCNews.com. Just. Featuring my client. Right. So now. Okay, it's seen by 65 million people. So that it happened that quickly in one week in this cold, you know, with a cold kind of opportunity. And, you know, I don't know, that necessarily brings in a lot of business directly. But here's what happens now my realtor client can use as seen on NBC, no other real estate agent in their community can do that when they go after listing appointment, that listing appointment, you know, when they're asking questions and they say, well, they drop the article on the table and say, well, when I was NBC news housing price specialist.

Karen Yankovich:

Right. Um, that you don't lose business that way. Right. So it can happen as simple as simple as that. And all they were doing was providing value. So, you know, again, I have a podcast, I get a ton of podcast pitches. I don't necessarily I mean, I look at them, but I very rarely use them because to me, I don't really know these people. But if somebody takes the time to listen to my show, share it on social media, tag me in it and say, love this episode, you know? And by the way, you guys, if you want to be on Johnny's show or my show, do that right now to this show, right? Share it with your audience. We will remember that. And then, you know, we'll check you out. And if at some point down the road you want to be a guest, that you can have a much better shot of that happening because you took the time to provide value before you just started pitching yourself.

Karen Yankovich:

So you can take that example across all journalists, the the whole PR spectrum, um, that middle category, there's just no end of opportunities. Like, you know, we all belong to or many of us belong to organizations, right? It could be as simple as a Facebook group that you're in, right? Who if the Facebook group is full of your ideal clients, who runs that Facebook group? Maybe go to them on LinkedIn and say, hey, I'm a member of your group. I love that group. You know, um, I'd love to be connected to you here. Right? You're not pitching them yet. You're just saying I think there might be opportunities to collaborate, go to the, you know, join an organization. Join like here in the United States, we've got National Association of Women Business Owners. And then there's state, state. And sometimes there's even more than one subgroup within the states. Join those organizations, open up the directory, don't pitch, don't reach out to everyone in the directory but cherry pick.

Karen Yankovich:

Right. Hey, I just joined the I just joined this association. Um, I see that you are a member in the association. I think our audience seem like they might be similar. I'd love to hear. I love to connect and hear. How are you leveraging this? You know, how are you leveraging this organization? How can we, you know, how can I best use this? Reach out to the people that run the organization and say, hey, I just became a member. How can I best leverage this? Right? Maybe they'll get you some some visibility, right. So you can you can also kind of meld the first two categories that who might be a client and who might be a partner by kind of mining those directories and say, reaching out to people that you think might be a good client. But the outreach is, hey, I'm a new member of this blah, blah, blah chamber of Commerce. Um, I really like I came across you. It looks like you've been a member for a while that really like what you're doing.

Karen Yankovich:

I'd love to connect with you here, you know, and then just start by connecting. And, you know, Johnny, sometimes somebody might say, well, what do you want? Right? And that's okay. Let them go. They're not your people. You're going to find opportunities to, to start conversations. So so take that example like you go to conferences. Are you connecting with all the speakers. You know, are you telling them that you want to watch. You're looking forward to going to the conference. Are you writing them a recommendation after the conference. Right. Like these are this is what I mean by like just be, but be really intentional about who these people are. I have one client that I'm working with right now. She, um, I'm not going to name names because it's imminent. It's coming out imminently, but she wants to work with. I'm just let's just say HR directors. That's not exactly who she works with, but HR directors and, you know, like, we're like, how do we get to them? Well, what she decided to do was create a white paper and she took so her her average sale is about $50,000.

Karen Yankovich:

Right. So she's looking for corporate contracts in the $50,000 range. So she took a month or two to come up with a topic, reach out to like 50 different HR directors that she wants to be. They she wants them to be her client. But she reached out and said, I'm looking for feedback on this topic. Can I interview you? She did some interviews. She's got some video interviews, some audio interviews, some text interviews, her white papers about to be published. Right. And now she's going to do more outreach and say, all right, let's talk. How can we get this in front of as many hands as possible? But ultimately, you know, if four of those people, you know, say, yeah, I want to hear more about your services, that's $200,000, right? So so it's about diving deep and creating sometimes these opportunities. So it's not it's not just about spamming spamming, spamming. It's about thinking outside the box, getting creative and building actual relationships with the kinds of people that you think can bring more wealth into your world.

Jonny Ross:

I love the idea of, um, uh, speaking to speakers, uh, at a conference, giving them recommendations afterwards, tagging them, uh, during and pre and post all of that sort of stuff. And, and and you know, I'm not not. Trying to be, um. Uh, I'm certainly not trying to be big headed, but but to me, that's natural stuff that I've always done. But very few people do it. Very few people do it.

Karen Yankovich:

And I speak about LinkedIn at conferences. Typically I bring so I have so there's a Dunkin Donuts chain here in the US. I have $5 Dunkin Donuts gift cards. I have a stack of them, and I give them away at a conference. To anybody who's connected with me on LinkedIn beforehand, I am not going to go broke giving away these gift cards. Yeah, it almost never happens. It almost never happens. And and you know what? And I speak on LinkedIn. You think that that would be a natural, right? It almost never happens.

Karen Yankovich:

And you know, the you're taking the time to go to these conferences. And I'm going to flip this a second. Johnny, what if you are the speaker at a conference, right. What you can then do is go into your LinkedIn network, kind of do us like maybe if you have Sales Navigator, you can actually do a geography like, um, miles, you know, a certain amount of miles or kilometers around your thing and, and then do some outreach to people. Like if you're speaking, let's use realtors again. We're speaking in a real estate conference. Go into Sales Navigator, say show me all my first degree network. Who are realtors, who are within 25 miles of where I'm going to speak and reach out to them and say, are you going to be at this conference? I'd love to see you in person. We've never met in person or we the conference organizers of it, because the people show up at the conference and say, I'm looking for Karen, right. So they know that you brought people there, and those are your buyers.

Karen Yankovich:

Those are your buyers when they show up. Right? So there's just so many ways you can do this, but it's about thinking outside of the box and and building actual relationships with people.

Jonny Ross:

Yeah. And and it's so easy to stand out in a lot of the examples that you've, you've given. One of the things that you've mentioned, you've sort of glossed over a couple of times is, um, the I can't remember the word you use, but having a really you took it that you already have a good LinkedIn profile. That was sort of the basic and I just wanted to define what that is. I assume it's about branding it up, making it look right, making it have the right language, the right words. What are the things that that in your mind make a.

Karen Yankovich:

You know, it's interesting.

Karen Yankovich:

A lot of people think about LinkedIn, your profile as like an online resume. And your resume is all about who you used to be, right? Your LinkedIn profile should be positioning you for the person you're stepping into, right? It should be your personal brand, not your resume.

Karen Yankovich:

So there's that. The experience section, which is the most resume like section, but you can also custom craft that. And I'm not saying I don't want you to make things up, but you also don't have to talk about everything you've ever done. Just talk about the things that are relevant, that builds you up to what you're doing right now. You know, if if what I did, I was I owned a company 25 years ago and I did everything in that company. If what I was doing now is HR related, what you would see on that is I would talk about negotiating for health benefits and hiring and firing, but I don't even talk about that even though I did that work, because it's not relevant to what I'm doing now. So even down to the experience section just kind of build the story of you up to where you are today and, and then in your you're about section, which is the hardest section to do, but it is the section that is the most important, you know, make that up, tell people about you.

Karen Yankovich:

Right. But use first person. Make it story ish. Right. Like give them a story. Make them want people want to read it and remember that nobody cares about you. They care about what you can do for them. Right? So I can go on and on. You absolutely want to incorporate keywords into your profile because you want to think about what are people searching for on LinkedIn, which is a little different than on a search engine that you want to come up with in a search result. So you want to use pepper that pepper those words in there. Um, and I also think if we're talking to an audience of mostly entrepreneurs, I think, and or a creative or somebody that has a personal brand or a thought leader brand, I think you should be using Creative creator mode on LinkedIn. You should have your profile in LinkedIn creator mode, which is free and which gives us the opportunity to showcase what we create. And and that helps position you with that thought leader brand that we talked about.

Jonny Ross:

So creator mode is more for if you're going to be sharing content as well. Yeah.

Karen Yankovich:

Not necessarily yes, but not necessarily what it does is it positions you and anything you've created um, above your skills and stuff like that. Right. So so but but it gives you opportunities. You get you get the opportunity to do LinkedIn live. You get a LinkedIn newsletter opportunity. You get, um, additional links that you can share to like your website or, you know, a lead magnet or something like that. Right? So it gives us more tools than, than traditional resume like type normal, LinkedIn normal.

Karen Yankovich:

Um.

Jonny Ross:

I mean, I don't know about you, but in terms of, uh, frequently asked questions from the sort of demographic that we're talking about here, I can hear them saying, so how often should I be posting on LinkedIn and what should I be posting? I bet you get that question.

Karen Yankovich:

The good news is you don't have to post a lot on LinkedIn. You. Don't.

Karen Yankovich:

And and listen, the minute these words come out of my mouth, LinkedIn is going to change it. And maybe they changed it yesterday and I didn't know yet. Right. So anybody that tells you and this is exactly how it works, don't believe them because it it's changed. She changes. But generally um, there are people out there that like to do their, their, they like to count posts and count things. And I'm so grateful for them because they, I learned from them and the studies that they do when they count posts and count likes and count engagement is that more than once a day actually reduces your reach for each post, and that once a day doesn't necessarily have to even be your own content, right? Like, you know, if you are, um, you know, like, this is out on my LinkedIn profile right now. So this is my once a day I don't have to do anything right. I just showed up to talk to you. So so, you know, at most once a day, um, you know, if you're doing a few times a week, that's a beautiful thing, too.

Karen Yankovich:

Again, I'm not too worried about how many people see my posts I am I'm more concerned with who's on my calendar. But that being said, as you're starting to build out your network through all these people, we talked about the journalists, the podcast host, the people in your associations. You want to stay top of mind with them. So you do want to have consistent content going out, um, tagging people where you can. And if you're doing these things that we're talking about here, the content piece is going to come naturally. You don't have to create something fake. Yeah.

Jonny Ross:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. So this is very much about mindset. It's about confidence. It's about actually, you know, spinning it on its head and thinking, well actually, you know, maybe they are interested in hearing from me. Uh, I do I do know what I'm talking about. Um, and you've said it a couple of times, uh, thinking outside the box. So using opportunities, not just sharing an article, but tagging the the, uh, the the journalist, I mean, what a.

Karen Yankovich:

Great idea with the.

Karen Yankovich:

Journalists and telling them how much you love their article and how much you loved what they wrote. Who doesn't want that? You know, it used to be, you know, years ago with the news, they would say things like, if it bleeds, it leads. Right now they talk about if it's shareable, it's terrible. So they, you know, especially journalists like NBC and things like that, they get there's actually I was at a new a local TV station here in new Jersey a couple of years ago, a couple of years ago, maybe. And they have a they have like a leaderboard on the wall of social media posts and likes and engagement and shares and contents. They, they actually get like they track that stuff. They, they're tracking that stuff. So they, they're very happy when, when we're sharing their stuff and it it fits right in. I also went to a, I saw a panel recently um, and we, you know, we talked to like one of the questions that and that was all New York and I live right outside of New York City.

Karen Yankovich:

So this was New York City journalists here. This was not like, you know, in the middle of nowhere. This is some of the, you know, biggest journalists in the world. And they were asked how what's the best way to reach you if we have a story? And every one of them said social media. Every one of them said social media. You know, DM us on Twitter, DM us on Facebook or LinkedIn. So that's where they're getting this information. Their inboxes are crazy. And they're, you know, they want their their their dynamic, their reaching. They want us to reach out to them. They need us to reach out to them.

Jonny Ross:

Uh.

Jonny Ross:

Karen, you have definitely made people think, uh, and and I think it is reflecting on that mindset, as you've said, you've got your own podcast which talked about the Good Girls Get Rich podcast. So if you are interested in listening to that podcast, please do, uh, Google it. You'll find it on your favourite podcasting platforms.

Jonny Ross:

You've got a, uh, a group program, uh, with quite a bit of a done for you element, and you do 1 to 1 work as well. Um, where do where should people find you? Uh, where do you obviously you hang out on LinkedIn.

Karen Yankovich:

I do.

Karen Yankovich:

Well, I'm at Karen Yankovic across all social media. Connect with me on LinkedIn. Um, and, you know, one of the questions you asked is like, what do I do if I don't know what to do? Well, I've answered that question. Um, we created an assessment. You can get the assessment at, um, Karen yankovic.com/quiz. Or I think if you go to LinkedIn quiz com, it'll take you there too. And it basically just will give you ask a couple questions and then based on your answers, whether you're more of like a white paper person or more of a relatable person, like kind of some things to get started, but also some things to look out for. So you can check that out.

Karen Yankovich:

That's completely free. Um, and it gets you into our world. And if you want to learn more, there's all kinds of ways to learn more. Once you start getting, you know, you get an email or two about the about your results on that. But because I think mindset is so important, I've actually added a lot of fun things to that quiz. So it's not just the you know, and here's your answer. We've I've even created, um, this was a lot of fun. Um, morning visualizations, depending on your type, to kind of just step into the day in a more confident, powerful way depending on which type. So there's four different ones for the four different results. So we had a lot of fun things to that, because I really want more women to understand that this is where the money is. And if you're not, if you're not sure where to start, I got to I got you start with the quiz or reach out to me. There's all over my LinkedIn profile.

Karen Yankovich:

There's ways to book a call on the calendar, you know, ask for help. I'm here to help.

Jonny Ross:

Uh, we.

Jonny Ross:

Will put a link to that in the show notes. Uh, but it is, as you said, Karen yankovic.com/quiz. We'll put it in the show notes. Uh, Karen, thank you so much.

Karen Yankovich:

This was fun.

Karen Yankovich:

This is fun. Thanks for having me.

Jonny Ross:

It's been fun. It's been enlightening. You're clearly very passionate about it. Um, but which I love. You know, I'm I'm passionate about this sort of stuff as well. Um, but it's really given, uh, people something to think about. Thank you so much. Thanks for listening. Thanks for being here. Thanks for watching. If you enjoyed the show, let us know. Reach out to us. Uh, and, um, and please do tell your friends and share. This has been Johnny Ross, fractional CMO with Karen Yankovic. Uh, the LinkedIn queen. I'm going to call you.

Karen Yankovich:

Uh oh. I'll accept.

Karen Yankovich:

That.

Jonny Ross:

We'll see you all soon.

Jonny Ross:

Take care. Thanks, Karen. Bye bye.