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Baker wants to boo you at work and Daniel Snyder of the Commanders is at it again. Plus Nick Saban, Urban Meyer, and Gator’s Spring game
Episode 24615th April 2022 • Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris • Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris
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In episode 246 of Sports Bliss with Rob and Kris, Rob and Kristie start the episode discussing recent Baker Mayfield news, including how he feels about the Browns and which team he would like to be traded to. Then Rob and Kristie discuss the disaster in Washington with the NFL's Commanders. Rob shares with Kristie the news that the Commanders and team owner Daniel Snyder were cooking the books to hide revenue from other NFL owners and players. Next, they get into a discussion about Nick Saban's reaction to Dabo Swinney and the problem with NIL in college sports. They also discuss a return for Urban Meyer? Plus a discussion about the upcoming Florida Gator's spring game and a dive into the enormous staff assembled by Billy Napier.

As always Rob and Kristie end the episode with trivia and a would you rather.

If you enjoyed this episode please subscribe, rate, and tell your friends or anyone you think would enjoy our podcast. Text or leave voice messages for us at (407)494-6420 and we may read or play them on the next episode.

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Transcripts

Speaker:

The opinions on this podcast are of the hosts and guests only and may contain childish humor. Listen at your own discretion and now please adjust your headphone volumes to an unreasonable level and prepare to enjoy the most dynamic and electrifying podcast that Cyberspace has encountered.

Speaker:

Welcome back to another episode of Sports Bliss with Rob and What's up, everybody? How are you guys doing? That's great.

Speaker:

How about you?

Speaker:

Let's talk about us. We are 13 days away from the NFL draft, baby. Guess who I'm drafting?

Speaker:

I'm sorry. Extremely. Um, sorry.

Speaker:

No one. Because you're all losers. That was just for dramatic effect.

Speaker:

Kristie, you're on the clock. I don't need a clock. I pass on everyone.

Speaker:

Yeah, never mind.

Speaker:

Not goodbye, NGE's. That's all you're going to say? Not good enough.

Speaker:

Exactly.

Speaker:

Yeah. So I got a lot of good stuff for you today.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

We're going to talk your favorite quarterback, Baker Mayfield. We are going to talk some Daniel Snyder getting in trouble with the Washington commanders in the NFL. We will follow that up with a little of the other favorite coach, Urban Meyers making the news again.

Speaker:

Oh, my God.

Speaker:

I know you're ready for that one. Then we're going to have a little Nick Saban talk. He's back in the news. Yes. And we're going to follow that up, wrap it all up in a nice little bow with some UF Gator talk. We've been talking a lot of Gators, but they've kind of been in the news. And their spring game is tonight, Thursday.

Speaker:

So we got a lot of drama to get into it.

Speaker:

Yes. So we got a bunch of stuff to do.

Speaker:

It hit it. It showed that we have got to start off with some Baker Mayfield. Tell me some good news. What is happening with him? Are the Browns keeping him? Are the Browns throwing him away? I was going to say something else, but it's not really appropriate.

Speaker:

We don't know yet. This is more about Baker. Mefield, not the Browns. Basically, he came out in an article, there was an article about him, an interview, and he felt really disrespected by the Browns. And I want to give you a clip from it. I want to get your reaction. Okay. I would love to show, um, up to somebody's cubicle and just boot the shit. Watch them crumb it. Uh, so basically, that was it. Yeah, just a snippet from it. So basically, in the interview, he's going along. Yeah, that was Baker. So he's going along talking about how he was disrespected, because basically the Browns promised him one thing, meaning, I think they told him, Listen, you're our quarterback. You're going to be the starter, this sort of thing. And then they turn around and they treat it for Deshawn Watson.

Speaker:

Obviously, um, he was pretty okay, Baker, because I know you're listening. It's time to get your head out of the sand. And listen, you have been with this team for how many years? Five. Is this going on? His fifth.

Speaker:

This is his fifth year. Yeah.

Speaker:

Okay. You have not done anything to help contribute other than to take them to one playoff game in five years. Yeah. So basically he was saying he's butthurt because they promised him that he would be the star, that he would bring them to this great victory. And he has yet to accomplish that and he cannot handle it. His ego is damaged, is bruised. Well, you know, buddy, if you were really paying attention, look alive, you would have seen this coming a mile away.

Speaker:

I think he's kind of I feel a little bit bad for him. Even though I don't really like Baker, I feel zero. But yet at the same time, he's making excuses and I'm going to parallel him with another quarterback, Blake Portals. He's probably more talented at Blake Portals, but they both kind of went to the same situation, crappy teams. They're both really bad when they got there and kind of the same thing happened. They kept getting new offensive coordinators and coaches. I think Blake had four offensive coordinators in four years or three in four years, something like that. And like three new head coaches during that time, too. That's very hard for young quarterback to overcome. Same with Baker Mayfield. He had a bunch of new coaches. He had like four offensive coordinators since he's been there, basically one every year. And so that's not good to develop a young quarterback. But at the same time, it's NFL. You got to produce or you're going to get to a salary where he's making 18 million a year now, and he wants to make that jump to 25 million like most starting quarterbacks. And nobody is going to want to pay you. That's where he is. He's kind of priced himself out unless he wants to become a career backup. And the problem now is there's no place for him. Everybody has their quarterback except for Seattle. And he came out in this article and said, oh, I would love to go to Seattle because he knows that's the only place that he could compete for starting quarterback right now.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

But Seattle is probably thinking we'll wait and see who we draft, because I think they have the 9th pick.

Speaker:

I mean, I feel like they are better off getting a draft pick.

Speaker:

Yeah. Because they can pay a guy a million dollars or $2 million, whatever the rookie scale is.

Speaker:

I don't know what it is, Baker. No one.

Speaker:

No, but you can save a lot of money. That's one reason they treated Russell Wilson is because he was making so much money and they couldn't make the team better around him.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

And so that's the problem Baker's in right now. Nobody wants that $18 million salary. Who would want it? And then him be a free agent the next year.

Speaker:

Well, listen, if they want a quarterback that's worth that much, he better be producing.

Speaker:

Exactly.

Speaker:

End of discussion.

Speaker:

So, Baker, sorry. I think people are going to continue to show up and boo you. That was the other thing. He goes people booing him in the stands. He's like, I'd love to go to their work and boo him, but you know what? You're a public figure.

Speaker:

How old is he?

Speaker:

You're a public figure. You are in the NFL. That's what happens in sports when you don't play well. The fans boo you.

Speaker:

It's really interesting. I have a theory about this, because he has never known what it's like to be this low, not in a, uh, performance, you know what I'm saying? Because he basically in Oklahoma.

Speaker:

He played one year.

Speaker:

He was winning all the time.

Speaker:

Everybody was like, they put a statue out in front of the Stadium for him.

Speaker:

I'm just saying, you have a lot of Brown noses around people like this. And this is the same issue that Trevor Lawrence is facing right now, too. He's never lost a day in his life, and now he doesn't know what to do.

Speaker:

Oh, yeah.

Speaker:

Now it's gone to his eco, back to Baker mefield. It's gone back to his eco to now he's like, oh, well, I'm going to just go to your work, and I'm just going to boo you. Dude, how old are you? First of all, you getting paid that much versus somebody that works at desk job that doesn't get paid. Six figures, not even that. And you feel like you have to go to that level. Like, dude, really? You know what I'm trying to say? Regardless if you're losing or not, all you have to say is, Well, I'm making 18 million. So I think there's some sacrifice that comes with this huge paycheck that I'm getting, right?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

People are not going to like me. At the end of the day, you have to decide it doesn't matter. People are going to hate you no matter what.

Speaker:

100%. It's funny, because I heard an interview with an ex player, and they were asking him about, I forget who it is right now. But they were asking him about fantasy football. And they were like, oh, did you ever get contacted by fans or whatever on you? Like, oh, can you whatever. I think he was a defensive back, actually. And they were like, were you ever contacted by people? Like, oh, the defense isn't earning us points or my receivers going up against you this week or whatever? And he started laughing. He was like, yeah, the one person that always gave me crap was my wife. She's big into fantasy football, and she would never pick people on my team because she didn't want it to be a conflict, but she'd be like, could you just let Julio Jones get, like, 100 yards today? Because I really need it for my League. And he's like, she was totally joking, but he's like, yeah, people think like that, and they'll boo you because your numbers aren't what they're supposed to be. And he's like, but that's part of it. That's part of being an athlete. He had the right idea with it, the right attitude. I don't know. Bakers. Baker's a Baker.

Speaker:

I just want to clarify. I'm not knocking anybody that works at desk job. No, you're simply trying to show that Baker Mayfield is a child.

Speaker:

Well, you're out there, you're out there competing and making a lot of money. And, like, I'm just saying.

Speaker:

There'S some backlash that's always going to come with when you have a high stake job. There's always going to be backlash here or there. You're never going to make somebody completely happy. You might make a certain, uh, group of people happy, but then the other group are going to be unhappy. So at the end of the day, he needs to do some soul searching and realize that, hey, listen, I made it to the NFL. And because I'm so used to people literally giving me whatever I want, they made a statue of him. He can't handle it.

Speaker:

And also, it's fair or not. Fair or not, we've talked about this many times. The quarterback gets the I've said, with Brady, right? You don't call him the goat, but he gets the credit when the team wins, but he gets the criticism when the team loses, too. And you chose to be a quarterback.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

And when you do that, you know that. So you're going to get the glory when the team plays well, and you're going to get the criticism when you don't. Otherwise, maybe you should be a safety. Maybe you should be a corner back. You know what I mean? And then you don't get the blame put on you like that when the team loses. But that's choosing being the quarterback and being a public figure, which leads me into, we weren't planning on talking about this, but Tim Newton, with his recent comments where he came out and basically was like, oh, women should know their place. What happened to them?

Speaker:

Cooking, respecting the man literally the biggest piece of garbage.

Speaker:

We've gone over that. And again, that's someone that has chosen to be in a profession that you're in the public spotlight. And I'm sorry, the reason I come down so hard on him, he can believe whatever he wants. Doug got Lib. He basically tweeted out and said, Why is everybody getting on Cam? That's between him and his woman. You don't have to date Cam. Right. Which is a true fact, yes.

Speaker:

But he's also in a limelight where dozens of people look up to him.

Speaker:

Exactly. There's thousands of kids around the country that look up to him, and he's a role model.

Speaker:

There's this whole generation of younger kids that are like, oh, my gosh, they idolize Kim Newton. It's a real thing.

Speaker:

There was a recruit just at UCF, and they were asking him about his idols, and he starts he's a receiver. He started naming different people. Calvin Ridley and all this stuff. I think it was Kobe Hudson who transferred from Auburn, and he said one of his idols was Cam Newton because he played quarterback in high school. Kobe Hudson, mhm, but now he's a receiver.

Speaker:

They don't realize there is this is what camp doesn't understand. He can have whatever values he wants. That's part of you having your own thought, your own brain. You do whatever you want. But when you impede, it on such a huge platform that you have and basically are saying derogatory things about women and these horrific stereotypes that women should are only good for cooking or only good for X, Y, and Z. That's setting up the next generation to think like that as well. That is completely unacceptable. We're in 2022. Like, come on.

Speaker:

Yeah. And you're having there's title ball down the street.

Speaker:

I don't need to go Cook just to serve my purpose.

Speaker:

There's also Uber Eats.

Speaker:

Also Uber Eats.

Speaker:

Non sponsored. Uh, but it's the same with these NFL teams getting in trouble for all the sexual harassment. The Washington team, Dallas.

Speaker:

This is my thing with Camden.

Speaker:

Whoever helped such trash.

Speaker:

Because this is not the first time that he has made these 100% very misogynistic statements.

Speaker:

Yes, for years and years.

Speaker:

And, you know, like, listen, if you genuinely feel that way about women, I feel really sorry for your daughter. I feel really sorry for your wife. Whatever woman is in your life camp. I feel genuinely bad for them.

Speaker:

And honestly, I hope it's because.

Speaker:

Listen, hold on 1 second. Who makes you King of the jungle? Okay, last time I checked, you were unemployed. Why don't you get to work? How about that?

Speaker:

That's what someone said. They're like, aren't you supposed to be the breadwinner when you're the man of the house and you don't have a job right now, bro. Yes, but anyway, but the fact of it is, there's plenty of women in very important positions in the NFL now. Absolutely. Why would you want to hire someone like that to your team with that attitude towards women when you're trying to promote equality? He is garbage anyway.

Speaker:

Garbage.

Speaker:

Let's move on. We'll continue with the NFL, and we're going to talk a little. Daniel Snyder, the owner of the Washington Commander.

Speaker:

This guy does not know how to keep himself out of trouble.

Speaker:

Well, this all stems from that investigation where they had to turn the emails over.

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Remember, because they were in trouble with the cheerleaders. We talked about that before. You can go back and listen to the episode if you don't know what we're talking about. But I'm sure you do. Basically, the government is now involved and they reviewed things and they're like, there are some very questionable things about their finances that they uncovered in these emails.

Speaker:

Like money laundering.

Speaker:

Not money laundering. Basically, they were cooking the books, as Marty Bird would say, isn't that he's not money laundering per se? Because I think they would turn in the right stuff to the IRS. I think that hasn't come out yet. We don't know. Allegedly, he'll go to jail if that's the case. But basically he has one set of books that he was showing to the NFL. And then he had mhm another set of books that he and his small inner circle would review. And they were doing things like, it's really bad because they were taking advantage of the fans. So they do what are called leases on seats. So you don't own the seats, but you can say, okay, I want these seats for the next ten years. Season tickets. Right. And they make them buy them that way. Well, they make you put down a deposit for it. Right. And then at the end, you're supposed to get your money back. Well, they have emails proving that they were going out of their way not to refund those deposits to fans. And they said as of 2016, there was at least $5 million that they withheld from fans. I think that's one of the worst things they did. They were also hiding revenue from games. So they would sell the tickets for more, for instance, or have game day revenue that was higher. They would say it was lower. And then they would put that money on their books, so they would show what they were making, but they would shift the money over and say, oh, well, that money came from this concert or that money came from this College football game. The reason that is.

Speaker:

Do they use that Stadium?

Speaker:

Yeah, but the reason that's important is because they only consider the money generated on the NFL game day as NFL money. So you can use the Stadium for other things. Right. Like Jerry Jones uses Dallas Stadium for a bunch of other stuff. He doesn't have to share that money with the other NFL owners. They have revenue sharing.

Speaker:

Okay.

Speaker:

But stuff that's on the Dallas Cowboy days, he has to share.

Speaker:

Same with Washington Commanders to what the MLB players were on strike about?

Speaker:

Yeah, it's kind of the same thing.

Speaker:

Similar.

Speaker:

But this is where basically with MLB, all the owners were doing that to try to steal from the players. This he was stealing from the other owners, because if they make a certain amount, they have to share the revenue between all the teams. So say, like, Jacksonville doesn't make as much money. Teams have to send Jacksonville money. The other owners, they do revenue sharing.

Speaker:

Sharing that money with the players. No, only himself.

Speaker:

No, he was keeping it for himself. So then that's the other thing. Not only does that money get shared with the owners, but it also sets the salary cap. So basically. Uh huh. However much the teams are making, I don't remember the percentage, but there's a percentage that the players are supposed to get and a percentage the owners are supposed to get. Okay. So that number determines what the salary cap is. So if the owners are hiding the money, which is what MLB was accused of doing, then the player salaries are lower. So an MLB is a little bit different because they basically were saying the players were using examples of, like, bars and restaurants across from the Stadium. Okay. They say that that should be included in game day revenue because people are there because of the game.

Speaker:

Right, sure.

Speaker:

And baseball games are like every other day. Yeah, it's not once a week. So they're saying that business would not exist without the baseball game. So the players contend that that money should be go towards their salaries. A percentage of that, the owners say, no, these are our businesses separate from the Stadium. So it shouldn't. So that was part of the lockout. That was a big part of the lockout.

Speaker:

Okay, so getting back.

Speaker:

Yeah. So Snyder is in big duty right now, so we don't know which way it's going to go. I'm assuming the owners are pretty pissed about this. The other owners.

Speaker:

Okay, wait, what did I hear Ja Rule say that's called? Oh, yeah, fraud.

Speaker:

I would say that's false Advertisement, actually. But anyway, so that's what's going on with them. But I thought that was terrible. And they did the usual things that every team does. Basically, they take all the general mission tickets and they sell them to Company X. I don't know who, but say, like, Ticketmaster or StubHub. They would sell them to these companies, mhm. And then they would tell the fans, oh, sorry, we don't have any more General mission tickets. Same thing that happens with concerts, right? They sell out within a minute because these computers go in and buy everything. They really don't. They have to deal with these companies beforehand. The tickets are already sold before they go on sale. And so these third party companies get them, and then they Jack the price up to make a profit for themselves. But also what that does is the fans of the football team. They were told, oh, well, those tickets already bought, but we have these luxury tickets available that you can buy. So they would sell out all the luxury tickets, and then the hub stab or whoever, uh, would come out and say, oh, we have tickets afterwards and sell them so that the fans were kind of bait and switched to buy more expensive tickets.

Speaker:

Listen, I believe that this happens a lot more frequently.

Speaker:

I think that happens with every team. I think that happens with every team.

Speaker:

Just keep your eyes open, because I believe that this is actually happening all over the place.

Speaker:

Yeah, I think that's a problem. So we will have to keep following. But if this doesn't make the other owners make Snyder sell, I don't know what's going to happen because he's been a bad owner since he's been there. He's been a bad owner since he's been there.

Speaker:

That's crazy.

Speaker:

Yeah. All right. You want to move on a little bit more?

Speaker:

Yeah.

Speaker:

Let's go. Our favorite coach that has a deal with the devil, Nick Saban, is back in the.

Speaker:

News. He heard me talking about him saying that he's on the decline.

Speaker:

Yeah, that wasn't it. He wasn't really concerned about that. He's not worried about Christie from Sports Bliss telling him he's done now he's on the same train as Dabo. He's talking about the same thing Dabo Sweeney was talking about that we talked about last week.

Speaker:

I have a very strong feeling that the two of them are in Cahoots.

Speaker:

It's very interesting. And the third person that was in on this was Lincoln Riley, who just left Oklahoma for USC. Those are three of the coaches that have been in the playoffs the most Besides Ohio State. Right. It's interesting that these mhm three guys are all of a sudden all this Nil is a terrible thing. College football is going crazy. It's going to end. We're going to explode. We can't sustain this.

Speaker:

Wasn't Nick Saban just saying that he had a player that had an Nil deal for like four 4 million something? No, wasn't he talking about.

Speaker:

I don't remember that. But Bryce Young, he definitely I remember last year, he said Bryce Young had a million dollar over a million dollars in Nil deals before he ever took a snap. And he was bragging about it to the high school coaches in Texas.

Speaker:

Nick Saban. Yeah, that's what I'm talking about.

Speaker:

Yeah. So he was talking about that last year. Right. But basically he's come out and said, I don't know that this is such a good idea, that this is a sustainable situation. He's like, It's going to create a cast system where people are more valued than others on, um, the team he proposed, maybe we should just go to a system where all the players are paid the same thing for Nil. And then that takes away schools from buying players. He goes, People are making deals with high school players to go to their school. That's not what this was supposed to be.

Speaker:

But they were doing that before this.

Speaker:

That's what I don't know exactly. I'm like Bro Nick, okay. Alabama has never paid for a player. I don't think kidding me.

Speaker:

No, I believe that they haven't because I don't listen. Their Championships speak for themselves and they have the most drafted players in the NFL. In the NFL. So I genuinely believe Nick Saban is like, listen, I don't need to pay you to come to school. Do you want to be in the NFL? Then you show up. I think that's kind of his mindset. Maybe years ago he bribed people, but I don't think it's actually happening now.

Speaker:

I think that's the narrative that he says one 100% that do I think it's true that there weren't donors that would pay guys privately? Oh, I'm sure one 100% happened.

Speaker:

But Nick save him personally? I don't think so.

Speaker:

Yeah. It's the thing of. Oh, well, I don't know what's going on. He's at a donor meeting. Oh. You know, I really hope this kid comes to school here next year. I really hope this five star quarterback, because we really need him. Although we have two other five star quarterbacks already here. We need this guy. And the donors go, okay, don't worry, Coach. We got it. And then they go and do their thing.

Speaker:

No, they have an unspoken agreement.

Speaker:

I think for years they did. Now it's legal. So now they're collective, like we've talked about. Right. Where you and I, as fans, we can donate to the Collective or ten, twenty, $2100 a whatever it is, we decide, okay. And do that on a recurring basis. And then they pay these kids basically, they pay them to retweet and stuff like that. They don't really do anything.

Speaker:

Right.

Speaker:

Nick Stevens. Right. That was not the intent of this. The intent of this was kids to go out and be able to get a job or be able to go and represent a car dealership or something if they want to, on their own and get paid. Sure. And he still doesn't have a problem, um, with that. He said, the problem is that they're paying these kids to go to the school, and that is a one 100% of what the law is supposed to be.

Speaker:

Yeah, but they were doing that.

Speaker:

Okay. That's what collectives are doing. Right. They're paying kids, supposedly once they're there, to, uh, stay or give them opportunities. Sure. And that's in a Gray area, but it's okay. Right. Okay. Then there are these things called directives. And I don't remember if we talked about this on here or not, but directives are big booster. A guy multimillionaire, decides, I want this kid to go to school there. They've told me they want him. And he calls that kid on his own or his handler and goes, okay, I'll give you a million dollars over the next four years if you come to school X before he goes there. And he doesn't want any return on it. He's been giving millions of dollars to the University anyway over the years. And so he continues his donation. He just gives it directly to the kid. Those are called directives. That's what these schools are doing. Now, it's been confirmed that the Gators have won. Most of the big schools have them. And Billy Napier asked straight out to Scott Strickland, the Ad, when he came to Florida, he's like, what's our plan for recruiting? And he wasn't talking about facilities. He said, if you want to be serious about recruiting, you got to pay players. That's what he meant. Because he was at Alabama, he was at Clemson, he's been at these programs.

Speaker:

You know how it works.

Speaker:

But now it's spoken. Okay, but here's the problem now, right, because it's truly legal. Now, see, this became a problem because Tennessee is paying some kid eight, $8 million to there. He's a junior in high school. Now, they don't like it because they're like, oh, crap, we're going to have to pay everybody. And we're not paying anybody right now, really. I mean, we're not paying a lot of players because we're telling them, you come here, you're going to be in the NFL.

Speaker:

Didn't I tell you that this was a bad idea from the very beginning? You were all in for it? And I said, no, this is not.

Speaker:

I love it because it's great drama.

Speaker:

This is not going to end well. It's not going to end well.

Speaker:

But the other problem is now, this is where it's really become a problem.

Speaker:

Right?

Speaker:

And they go on to talk about the transfer portal, both of them, because they never used to have their big players transfer. They would have players that weren't really playing, sure, when they were freshmen or whatever, some would wait around, but some of them figured out, Listen, I'm not going to play there. Aaron Robinson was a good one. He went to Alabama. He was there his freshman year. I think he figured out, I'm never going to play at Alabama. Well, you know what he did? He transferred to UCF. He became a starter the next year. And he's now in the NFL because he was a good player. But players like that would go. But last week, Nick Saban had a starter transfer. He's had a couple of starters transferred.

Speaker:

So now the plot thickens.

Speaker:

Now Limpon has had players mass exit. Now, he has truly felt the wrath they are feeling, the pressures of the other schools and the hypocrisy of it all is that he goes on to say, we've always done everything as fair as possible in College football, and that is not fair.

Speaker:

Now give me a break, give me a break, break me off a piece of.

Speaker:

Dutch. And I'm like, come on, everybody knows there's bagman in the SEC. That's the reason they get the best players.

Speaker:

But this is what I don't like. It's like everybody knows that. Everybody does it, but then they want to act like they're not doing it.

Speaker:

Like, dude, we know he is. We know, come on. So I don't know, it's just interesting that he's chimed in and now Lincoln Riley starting to chime in. The other guy that will get the highest recruits. And the funniest part of it all is that when Jimbo Fisher is accused of this to get the number one class, he's like, how dare you say we pay for players? He should have gone up one 180 to and been like, yeah, we paid for them. We got the best players and we're going to keep doing it every year. So if other teams don't do it. We're going to get the best class every year and we're going to win ten Championships in a row. Yeah. He missed the opportunity. Instead, he tried to deny it and it makes him look silly. Yeah. Because everybody's doing it.

Speaker:

So what does this implement for them coming out and speaking about it, what are they ultimately trying to gain? Are they trying to raise awareness like, oh, my gosh, now we're going to be number five instead of number one? That's basically the narrative is what they're coming out with.

Speaker:

Nick Steven is still going to be top five team. Come on, they're going to get the players. They're Alabama. They're going to coach. Well, until he retires, they'll be fine. I think it depends on who you're talking about in this scenario. We'll take basically and this is just my theory. We'll take Dabo Sweeney and we'll take Nick Saban. Nick Saban wants a set of rules for the whole country because he wants to know what he can do and what he can't do. I think he likes to try to play by the rules, but he likes to turn a blind eye. Right.

Speaker:

He wants a set of rules for everyone to follow. Step him.

Speaker:

Well, pretty much. But I think he just wants a set of rules. Right. And he's fine. Kind of just keeping on going because in the same breath he said in another interview, well, if this is the way they want it to be, we'll be Alabama and we'll still win. Meaning he has donors in his back pocket that will take care of what he needs to take care of. Right. Okay. Dabo Sweeney is in a different boat, I think.

Speaker:

Well, I mean, he doesn't really have anything to offer.

Speaker:

Davos Sweeney is in a different boat because just financially from the institution. And I think Nick Saban's pushing for the universities to take this over so they don't have to ask donors for money over and over again because here's the slippery slope. I keep coming to you, you're a massive donor. Right. And I say, I want this kid. And you're like, okay, I'll get him. You get that kid for me. Quarterback, right. What happens when I don't start that quarterback and you've paid a million dollars?

Speaker:

It's going to be some problems.

Speaker:

You're going to be like because the only thing you're getting out of it is wins from the school and going to a ball game and parking passes, whatever free trips to the game or whatever we would give you probably right. But we need that money to go to the player. And when we don't win or that kid doesn't play well and they don't put him on the field, you're going to be like, Yo, I paid him all this money. What are you doing? This is why I've been against paying players. That's the reason guys like Nick Saban are against this, because they don't want the boosters to run the program. Yeah. He wants to still be able to run the program. That's it. He doesn't care about paying the play or not. He wants the money to come from the University so he controls it's not going to happen. He actually said that? He said we should just pay them all the same amount. Pay everybody on the team. He didn't say how much, but he said just pay them all the same. But how do you pay the starting quarterback the same as the third string linebacker.

Speaker:

This is where it's a bunch of Gray areas. And honestly, this should have never been passed.

Speaker:

So this is what I think Nick Saban wanted. Well, the problem with it is you can't tell kids they can't go out and get a.

Speaker:

Job based on University or whatever. Each program is different. They should have a set of jobs that make the kids work on campus.

Speaker:

They used to do that. They're called shadow jobs.

Speaker:

Whatever.

Speaker:

You know what shadow jobs are? Make them volunteer. No, you know what the job is? It's shadow jobs. They're shadow jobs. You don't show up to it. They just pay you. You have a campus job, but you never show up. It's like you're in charge of the sprinklers.

Speaker:

On Tuesday.

Speaker:

They turn on by themselves.

Speaker:

They have a full scholarship. They get what I'm saying.

Speaker:

It'S out of the bag.

Speaker:

What else do you need money for? You have all of your room and board paid for. You have your classes paid for. You have your books. Did I mention dorm room, whatever apartment you have all that paid for. Groceries paid for. You eat for free at the school. What else do you need money for?

Speaker:

Listen, we can't have that discussion because it's already happening. It's already happening. And listen, only two, 2% of players go to the NFL. So if they can make more money. Someone said today, I think it was Rick New. Heisel I heard him saying he's like, oh, well, it's the College experience. It's the College experience they're missing out on when they transfer and just looking for money and all this. I mean, come on, let's boil it down. Why do you go to College? You go to College to make money, right? Eventually. Most of us, right? Yeah, but most of us aren't fortunate enough to make money in College. What if you could have made a million dollars while you were in College?

Speaker:

I wouldn't be in College.

Speaker:

You would have done it, though. You would have gone to class and gotten your million dollars. You can't say you wouldn't. So I don't blame the kids. So that's off the table. We can't change that. But let's go back to let's go back to Deborah real quick. Okay. Why does he want to do it? He keeps talking about making a forty, 45 to 50 League, like a Super League. Right. Well, I feel like because he has nothing to offer for his people to go to his program because he is stuck in the act. They own his rights for ten more years to Clinton to grant the rights.

Speaker:

He screwed.

Speaker:

Do you know how much they make a year for TV money?

Speaker:

Not a lot.

Speaker:

They make about thirty, 30 million now. That's a lot. No, they make thirty, 30 million now. It doesn't change for the next ten years. So for the next ten years they'll make thirty, 30 million a okay. The SEC this year is going to make sixty, 60 to 65 million. A couple of years they're going to be making one 100 million a so he's going to be competing with SEC schools making thirty, 30 million and going to be making one 100 million sees the writing on the wall that he can't compete with them. So that's the reason he wants this changed. Does that make sense? Same with Lincoln Riley at USC.

Speaker:

But why now?

Speaker:

Because all this just happened. The SEC just got that new contract and the act has been trying to get out of the contract and they can't nobody's going to let them out. They own them for the next ten years.

Speaker:

Well, sorry about yeah.

Speaker:

They made a bad deal. That's my theory on why the different guy is doing all this.

Speaker:

If he can't get out of it.

Speaker:

Then why would fuss about it? Because I think he really loves being at Clemson. He loves being there and he believes in that University, and that's cool. That's good for him. Is he going to leave? I think if things don't change, he will leave because it's not going to be long before Clemson can't compete with these other schools. Well, they barely competed last year because I don't know that they have the donor base to keep up, even in the ACC to keep up with some of these other schools. So it's going to be interesting. But definitely they won't keep up with the SEC or the Big Ten. The Big Ten is going to make almost one 100 million a couple of years, too. They're going to be in the ninety 90s. Those are going to be the two conferences that win every year. It'll be interesting to see which way this goes, but that's the reason people are pushing for this Super League outside of the SEC. And Greg Finky is not going to let that happen. He's the Commissioner of the SEC is not going to happen. All right, let's move on too much on this nonsense. One last thing that I thought of. This came up. I finally figured out, remember Blue Mountain State? Yeah. Remember when he said, oh, you can have the bagel but you can't have the cream cheese? No. Well, that was like a thing. It was like on things they could get. It was an NCAA violation that they had bagel cream cheese. Okay. And I never got it. I never got it. But I saw something recently. The reason it was that way is because back in the day, schools could give the student athletes three meals a day, but they couldn't give them four or five meals. Like some of these linemen need a lot of food. Right. Okay. But they were allowed to give them snacks. And in the actual articles, it would say what constituted a snack versus a meal and a bagel would be a snack. But if you put cream cheese on it, that was considered a meal. So that's the reason they were saying that's. So good bagel cream cheese was an NCAA violation.

Speaker:

How long ago was this?

Speaker:

I don't know. It's when Blue Mountain State was on whatever that was, it was like two 2010 whatever. But they've changed it. Since they can eat as much as they want, you can give them as much food as they want. Okay, let's move on. Urban Liar. Your favorite coach is back in the news.

Speaker:

He just can't.

Speaker:

I wanted to get your opinion on it. So the story has come out that he is potentially being offered his spot back on the Jaguars. No, he's getting offered his spot back on the Fox College football. Big Noon. I think it's called the Big Noon Kickoff Show. The competitor to game day. Okay. And he was pretty good on it. I don't personally like him, but his analysis and all that is very good. And apparently they got really good ratings when he was on there. So supposedly he's looking at going back to being on that. Are you believing this rumor which Urban Buyer said, or is he just being Urban Liar like normal?

Speaker:

Honestly, I wouldn't put it past him that he's going back.

Speaker:

You think Fox would hire him and bring him back?

Speaker:

Unfortunately, yes, I do believe that.

Speaker:

So do you think it will happen? Will he be back in the fall? Yes, I'm just doing that because then I won't watch it.

Speaker:

Was it debunked or what?

Speaker:

No, we don't know.

Speaker:

We'll find out in the fall. I'm sorry.

Speaker:

I think they're desperate for reading.

Speaker:

There's lots of people in the entertainment industry that are sketchy. Yeah, obviously sketchy, but love to have amnesia around Urban Meyer and will do anything to keep him relevant, including himself.

Speaker:

Oh, one 100%. Right. Let's move on quickly. We'll move on to Florida because it is their blue and Orange game tonight. They're having a spring game?

Speaker:

Yes. I thought it was canceled. I think they have enough players.

Speaker:

No, I'm being serious. No, they have enough players. I think they only have two tight ends on the whole team. So they're going to be playing the whole game. Probably they'll do. One Titan said they'll put people in the position. But regardless, what are you looking for as a sign out of the spring game or nothing at all? Does this even matter to you about the fall? Do you think this is the predictor or anything?

Speaker:

No. I've always said spring games mean absolutely nothing to me. I think it's more just to see where the team is at and how much improvement they need to make before fall season comes. So I really have zero expectations.

Speaker:

Are you curious to see how the quarterbacks are going to be?

Speaker:

No, because I don't think that this is a predictor.

Speaker:

I don't even know that Richardson is back yet from his name.

Speaker:

I don't think that spring games mean anything. They don't mean anything.

Speaker:

Yeah, I don't know that they do. I think it'll be interesting to see what type of offense he generally kind of runs to see what he's going to do with the Gators. But it's going to be very vanilla. It's not going to be that big. I think a big thing is to see if they're disciplined. I think that's going to be interesting to see if they've improved in that kind of area.

Speaker:

I think if anything, this is an opportunity to see how he's going to coach, in what place he calls or whatever, or how he handles situations.

Speaker:

Yeah, it'll be interesting.

Speaker:

I think I'm more interested to see how he is going to react.

Speaker:

But the other thing I'm interested in seeing is where they're going to put their numerous number of coaches that they have.

Speaker:

It's going to put them in the stands because, you know, nobody's going to be there.

Speaker:

Well, actually, that was a big thing. They were saying why did they have it on Thursday? Because people want to go to it. It's usually on Saturdays. And basically the four letter ESPN said you're having a Thursday.

Speaker:

Okay, first of all.

Speaker:

Which is probably better to have it on TV and have high school kids watch instead of have your alumni comb or fans or whatever.

Speaker:

Because it's like blazing here. It's too hot to have it Saturday during the day.

Speaker:

You see us having their Saturday. But regardless, I wanted to play a little game. How many? Okay, so there are twelve coaches on a team. All right. But then you can hire support staff like all these analysts and stuff. Yes. Right.

Speaker:

Which we know he's already done.

Speaker:

And he said he's hired a bunch of them. So how many total do you think he has on the Gator staff right now? There are twelve coaches, I'll remind you, what is the total of coaches and support staff?

Speaker:

I don't know.

Speaker:

Thirty, 30. Give you one more try.

Speaker:

Okay. More or less. More. Oh, my God.

Speaker:

Fifty 50. If I told you there are sixty 60 staff members.

Speaker:

They'Re going to be taking up the whole line.

Speaker:

What are they saying?

Speaker:

The sideline is going to be just I was thinking about it.

Speaker:

I was like, when they have a staff meeting, they probably need two rooms.

Speaker:

What is wrong with this man?

Speaker:

I don't know. There's so many.

Speaker:

It's his entourage.

Speaker:

I was just going down and there's like one said, coordinator two, which I don't even know what they're coordinating, but they're the second one, I didn't see a coordinator.

Speaker:

One is like a Stylist.

Speaker:

The other is like, no, they have several women on the staff. A lot of them are part of their recruiting team. So there's like associate recruiter. There's like on campus recruiting, which I've seen. They have that at UCF, but they have like five of them and they have what's called recruiting. And Gatormaid, I was like, what?

Speaker:

Gator made listen, he needs his needs, his Glam squad pretty much.

Speaker:

But I'm like, how does he have time to talk to them? All people were joking. They were like, does Scott Strickland even know everybody's name? Are they going to know all of their names at the game tonight? All the employees?

Speaker:

I'm going to say, I don't like my new coach.

Speaker:

No, but it's interesting. He did make a good point. If I can say in his defense on this, he did say part of the theory is they have all these people and really, why do they hire them? They have connections to recruiting. That's the truth of it. And that's what Sabin does, and that's what Dabo does, and that's what Kirby Smart does. Okay, so he's modeling it after all of them. The other reason, he said, and this is the reason kind of Alabama keeps rolling, even though they lose staff. He goes, you have all these guys on the staff, and some of them have been coaches before, and then you put them in these analyst positions so they learn what you're going to do. You kind of groom them. So if someone takes a job somewhere else, say a wide receiver coach leaves, you don't have to go outside the program and get a wide receiver coach. You can just promote that guy from within and you still have the continuity with recruiting. You still have the continuity with the team, all this sort of thing, and then say a guy leaves and goes for another position at school, you still know that guy eventually and you can bring him back at a higher position. So he's like, you create this very wide net of coaches around the country in this pool to pull from, to replace people so that you don't miss a beat. So it's kind of like an interesting thing, but that's a lot of money. That's a lot of money for that staff, you know? And when we know the SEC faucet of money, they just keep turning it on and squeak out a little more money. Oh, my.

Speaker:

Gosh, it's trivia time. Get into this. Are you ready for your question? What is Sinophobia?

Speaker:

Can I get a spelling for that?

Speaker:

C Y. No.

Speaker:

And then phobia. Phobia.

Speaker:

It's the fear of signs. I'm just.

Speaker:

Kidding. I don't even know.

Speaker:

Would you like to phone a friend? Sure.

Speaker:

Do you have a friend? No. Okay.

Speaker:

Do you give up?

Speaker:

I don't have any hints? Not one.

Speaker:

Well, okay. I can't think of something but it's going to give it away. Okay. We have this in our house.

Speaker:

We have this in our house and she has teeny tiny little.

Speaker:

Legs.

Speaker:

Specific dogs?

Speaker:

Yes, specifically it is the fear of Corky dog. No, I'm just kidding. It's just dogs.

Speaker:

That's funny. I never heard that one.

Speaker:

It's just random. I thought I saw this at the last minute. All right. Are you ready for this? Would you rather this might stir up?

Speaker:

Wait, I was going to say. What so you're saying Sinophobia that ties into our Baker conversation because he's afraid of the dog pound. Pound. That's what they call their fans. The dog pound.

Speaker:

The Brown.

Speaker:

Why you never seen it. They wear like the dog masks and stuff. Because it is Browns. Yeah, they call it the dog pound.

Speaker:

That's so weird. Whenever random. It's not weird. Random. Okay. Are you ready for this? Would you rather this is going to stir some? I don't know. I'm just going to say. Okay. Would you rather have another ten years with your partner aka me or a one night stand with your celebrity crush?

Speaker:

That's easy.

Speaker:

Celebrity crush. I'm just kidding. I would say first of all nobody can keep up with me so bye.

Speaker:

Yeah. One night isn't worth it.

Speaker:

That accepts me for me with my flaws and being crazy.

Speaker:

Yeah. One night isn't worth it. Buy. Yeah, one night isn't worth it. I would take the ten years for sure. Make it twenty 20. You're going a little too far.

Speaker:

All right, guys, we're going to wrap up today's episode. Thank you so much for hanging out with us. Everybody have a safe and fun weekend and we will see you next week. Bye. Thank you so.

Speaker:

Much. Thank you for listening to sports bliss with Rob and Chris available on Anchor FN Apple podcast Spotify and everywhere else fine podcasts are found. Follow us on Instagram and lead voice. Comments this has been a sports list with Robin Chris.

Speaker:

Production. I'm sorry.

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