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Has Australia become Authoritaria?
Episode 3926th January 2022 • The Secular Foxhole • Blair Schofield and Martin Lindeskog
00:00:00 00:47:40

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Vinay Kolhatkar joins us to discuss the latest ‘bad’ news from Australia , among other similar topics.

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Episode 39 (47 minutes) was recorded at 9 : 30 PM CET, on December 3, 2021, with Ringr app.. Editing and post-production was done with the podcast maker, Alitu. Transcript is provided by Veed.io.

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Transcripts

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This is the Secular Foxhole podcast.

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Today, Martin and I have a returning guest.

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Vinay Kolhatkar is an Australian freelance

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journalist, novelist, screenwriter, and finance professional.

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He is the chief editor of

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the Savvy Street in public intellectual

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eazine committed to Liberty and individualism.

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Vinay has authored a TV pilot, screenplay, Undercover,

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The Story of Jamila, and two cinematic thrillers,

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A Sharia London and The Frankenstein Candidate.

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He is also the co author of Media The

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Battle to Shape Our Minds, which delves into how

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and why fascism is taking over the west.

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And probably a good segue into what has happened in

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Australia and New Zealand over the last 90 days.

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I think it's just been your lockdowns have been

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lifted, but we saw some horror stories there.

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Vinay, can you delve into some of those? Sure, we can.

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Thanks for having me again. You're welcome.

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Good afternoon to you, Blair.

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And good evening to Martin. Good morning.

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Three different things I know.

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Is that morning for you? Yeah.

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Between 738 in the morning on Saturdays, we're

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almost always a day ahead of that's, right.

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Everyone else in night in Sweden and late afternoon.

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So when it comes to Australia, I was

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going to write this article, which I was

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going to call is Australia becoming authoritarian?

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And I was going to answer that in the affirmative.

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And I would still except for one thing

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that kind of I thought about yesterday.

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In fact, as I began to call, we should

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present this because there has been quite a lot

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of very selective presentation even by the right wing

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media on this issue of lockdowns.

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So, yes, the short answer is the entire world

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has moved towards China in the last two years.

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So officially, 1 December 2019 was the

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first time somebody presented in a Chinese

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hospital with Govin like symptoms.

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The Hong Kong based South China Morning Post

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says, no, this was a lot earlier.

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According to them, it happened in November.

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But we sort of two years into

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the pandemic and pretty much every country

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on Earth has become more totalitarian.

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And going towards the distance between

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the west and China is decreasing.

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And I wish it was China moving towards

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the west, but it's the other way around.

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So every state, every nation state

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has to become more authoritarian.

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And there has been some very specific

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problems in Australia and New Zealand.

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And what I want to stress is

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the foundation rather than the visuals.

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Okay, so in the American media, I believe

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you're getting visuals, YouTube videos, people protesting and

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they've been beaten up by the riot police.

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Are they being charged by

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police unmounted horses or batons?

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And they are getting hurt.

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They are getting fined heavily.

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And yes, that's all true, but a selective and it's

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true also in a lot of protests in Europe as

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well as I believe I've seen some videos of that.

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And no doubt there have been some protests and there

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have been a lot of riots in fact, in the

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United States, some of them are unrelated to the pandemic.

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Correct.

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So the primary defect in Australia, I'll stick to Australia

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for the time being is that we are the only

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Liberal democracy in the world who doesn't have anything resembling

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a bill of rights or a charter of what they

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call a charter of human rights.

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So the United States obviously does

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have a bill of rights.

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So does Canada in the UK, New Zealand, even

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I believe Singapore, even India and Iraq and even

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Iraq and Turkey included in that list.

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Yes.

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And I interrupt you, you don't have any link

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because you have heritage to United Kingdom and the

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British Empire with Magna Shorta or something like that.

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Yes, the Magna Carta is definitely a link.

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And the Australian Constitution guarantees are basically five rights,

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and that includes the right to vote, the right

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to a trial by jury, which I think is

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not present in some of the Asian countries like

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India, the right to not suffer religious discrimination or

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rather freedom of religion, and the right to not

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suffer discrimination by the origin of state, because Australia

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also is a Federalist nation state like the United

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States and Canada.

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But there is no freedom of speech.

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And also, sorry, there is a right to prop.

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The fifth one is a right to property compensation.

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So you don't have the right to prevent

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your property being acquired by the Crown.

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But should the Crown acquire it,

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they must give you just compensation.

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Big defect.

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But what we have seen over the last two

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years and as we said, authoritarianism has increased.

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And the reason for that is a defect

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that is present across the entire Western world.

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And let's come to that now, which is why my

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answer is in the affirmative for all of the west.

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So what we don't have in the UK and

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New Zealand, but what we have in the US,

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Canada, Australia, India is a federal nation state.

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So Federation of States have got together.

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And in India, it's kind of a strange animal

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because the Union dominates the States, but not so

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in Australia and the United States and Canada, normally

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always rather than normally the libertarians rejoice in Federalism,

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they say, oh, good to have decentralization.

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But let's go to the United States.

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Now, one of the problems we have is

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that the States have certain rights, includes emergency

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powers to prevent the spread of infectious diseases.

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And I believe that's enshrined in the 10th Amendment to

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the US Constitution, as well as what the American Bar

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Association says is 200 years of legal precedents.

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So they site this 19 or two case, which

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is more than 100 years ago in Louisiana.

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So it was the Port of New

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Orleans which was infected with disease.

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And instead of putting a positive obligation on the Port,

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which would be rational to have a play car or

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a board up there saying beware, don't come here.

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This is invested with whatever it is, asking them

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to put out an order and letting the free,

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healthy people choose whether they still want to take

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the risk of working at the Port in New

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Orleans, visiting it, or going there as a tourist.

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The state put an obligation on healthy

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people, preventing them from entering the Port,

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and the Louisiana Supreme Court upheld that.

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So we've had 200 years of precedent where the

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States can exercise emergency powers to prevent all sorts

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of movement rights to work, the rights we take

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for granted, and they may be even enshrined in

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some way in the Constitution.

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And that's what has allowed a lot of European

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States and even the United States to have all

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sorts of mandates, lockdowns, businesses, closures, vaccination mandates, the

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mandate to wear masks when inside and even outside,

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and two square meter rules, all sorts of things

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which have happened here as well.

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And most recently, the state of Victoria passed a bill

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to become law, which is called the Pandemic Bill.

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And these state powers were vested in the

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chief health officer and they're being transferred to

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the Premier, which is by the governor.

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People think that's incredibly unfortunate.

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And there were a lot of protest against that, too.

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But in sort of my thinking, it's neither here

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nor there, because the sort of argument was that

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the politicians shouldn't have that much power.

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Of course they shouldn't.

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Neither should anyone designated as the chief

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health officer, which is worse, kind of

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because it's an unelected bureaucrat.

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And we know that the so called chief

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health officers are anything but independent anyway, them

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having that power, what's kind of worse?

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Because the politicians, the governors, the Premier's

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hid behind the officer's skirts and they

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said, oh, no, but it's not us.

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That's the advice we're getting.

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And that's why we're introducing a lockdown

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or mask mandate or vaccination mandate.

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So we have this situation where virtually the entire

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West, I would say this is the reason is

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at risk because we have enshrined that law, the

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power to prevent infectious diseases located in emergency powers,

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and it's being exercised to a degree which has

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never been the case before, and especially it is

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being exercised against the disease, which arguably, with Omicron

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is getting perhaps more infectious but less deadly.

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A lot of coronaviruses have ended

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up causing only a common cold.

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So we had a lot better solutions than

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what has been actually imposed on us. Agreed?

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Yeah, it's the same here in the States.

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I mean, the media is absolutely one sided in

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favor of whatever the President or the governor's hear

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say to do, and they always extend the emergency

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powers of the governors for each state.

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I think there's only, like two States that

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have not extended those kind of emergency powers.

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The way you describe it, as

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everyone's lurking on moving towards China

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instead of China moving towards freedom.

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That's a perfect summary.

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Hopefully that trend can be reversed,

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but it's only through ideas.

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And when you have the media and right

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now, I guess big tech all on board.

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Indeed, you have a big sort of crony

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nest and what we call the deep state,

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a bunch of unelectric bureaucrats, the intelligence agencies,

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a whole range of associations.

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For instance, there's a joint release by the

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American Medical Association, the American Pharmacist Association in

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the American Society of Health Systems Pharmacists.

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And that condemns Ivory acting as a possible

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remedy for COVID or as a prophylactic.

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And in general, the establishment everywhere has been

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not in support of any alternate treatments.

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And I noticed there was a news in NBC that Dr.

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Mary bowed and she's in ENT, Houston Methodist

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Hospital was suspended because on her social media

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account, she touted as I would make potential

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therapeutic use against COLVID and NBC.

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When they reported it, they put her

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in the same box as Dr.

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Sue Macintosh, who lost her medical

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license because of faking vaccination certificates.

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Those two things are entirely different.

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One is you are doing fakery, maybe for the

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right reasons, but that's a completely different thing.

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A fraud is completely different

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to expressing a medical opinion.

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And we have a big problem here in Australia

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where the equivalent of the FDA is called TGA,

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the Therapeutics Administration and some doctors say they have

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been issuing directives is the word they use.

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So if you ask me, they should have no

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right to even provide guidance unless asked for.

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And the equivalent of the Mdn CDC in

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Australia has done everything it can to prevent

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the doctor patient relationship in respect of COVID

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from working normally and in variety of States.

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In the United States, also in European nation States,

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it's been the same thing has been happening is

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my belief in Sweden used to be touted Martin

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as the exception to the lockdown rules.

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But I don't know where they are.

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Like, can you go to a doctor and you and

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your doctor decide what treatment you should have or if

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someone comes down with covert it's only the state decides

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you get no treatment for several days.

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You're isolated at home and then if you're hospitalized,

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they decide they do with you in the hospital.

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It's not so strict and Blair and I have discussed it.

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But if you know that you have some kind of

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disease that could be deadly or could affect others, then

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you should take care of that, I think.

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But I think we should prevent it in different ways

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and also have a free information flow of information.

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So in a way I like how so

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called they have handled here in Sweden.

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But as you say, they are hiding behind the skirts.

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So this agency, when it went well, so to speak, they

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could talk and have a Press conference and so on.

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But when they start seeing a pattern and then we

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were not so popular anymore and when politicians did new

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things, but we have never had a real lockdown but

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in September they said everything is free.

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So now you could have party now

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you could have big events, gatherings, whatever. Yeah.

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And what happened then of course, and

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now we see this new version.

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So it's going back and forth the

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whole time but we don't have any.

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You have to wear mask and whatnot.

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But it's still these distances

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and other things like that.

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So that's relatively mild or social distancing to square

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four square meter rules and stuff like that.

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It's hard to administer and monitor anyway. Yeah.

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But again I think we should focus on

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I said we don't want to be conspiracy

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theories here but you said this about China.

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I read in Deutsche Valley I think it

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was early on about Wuhan, about the bats.

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And now I saw on a documentary like a science here

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on the telly they talked about how the bats was transferred

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to some animal event, to the people, to humans and also

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coffee in different variations have been during the history but it

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has been very silenced in a way and that's why I

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wonder so we should talk more about that, learn from what's

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happened there in Wuhan in China and also protect us for

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the future and also but also see the risks of course,

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but don't take the chance that it will be the big

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brother and the long run because think about all the businesses

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that have lost lots of money over with and other things

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like that.

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But you shouldn't do dangerous things

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and you shouldn't do stupid things.

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That's the thing here in Sweden and I've been

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there but now we said in September, now it's

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free to meet and have gatherings, big gatherings.

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And then what happened?

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Then it peaked again and I think in a way

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we have to live with it for rest for a

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long foreseen future and maybe we'll learn something from it.

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But I don't like the demands and I don't like

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how all the trust, so to speak in this agency

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with the bureaucrats and definitely not see how the politicians

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see their chance to really lock down.

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But on the other hand I'm happy

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that we haven't locked down totally.

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Personally I would say that that's not a good idea.

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And right now before we start recording, I

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saw on John Galt line the Facebook group

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there it was some British I think journalists

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that have interviewed somebody in Australia, a private

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individual that had a negative test.

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But she was set in not house arrested.

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It was more like a camp and then she was fine.

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She could be fined lots of money if she walked outside.

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And I thought that was horrendous and very scary.

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The fines here are quite horrendous.

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I think we probably lead the world

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on finds that are just astronomical.

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But here like in Sweden with lots

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of language to get the information out.

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They saw in different areas that the information was not

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going out about COVID and how you could protect yourself

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and about the vaccine and other things like that.

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We should talk about the vaccines and the protections

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they offer and fair bit of research here.

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And I wanted to draw a parallel with

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this index that the Heritage Foundation publishes, and

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it's quite famous around the world, has been

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happening for quite a number of years.

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It's called Index of Economic Freedom, and they

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judge nation States by your freedom to work,

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produce, consume, invest free flow of labor, capital,

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goods and the affirmation of property rights.

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Now, Hong Kong rates number one, but

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that doesn't count as a nation.

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So in the nation ranking, Singapore's number one, New

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Zealand number two in Australia number three, what surprised

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me is in 2021, it's still New Zealand number

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two and Australia number three, United States is 20

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at the United Kingdom is seven, China is 107

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in, India is 121 now.

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And a lot of the Southern American countries on

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the continent are down in the three figures. Okay.

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But I wonder if we could compute an index of

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medical freedom and the whole thing would be reversed.

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And by that, I mean, yes, you should

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be able to offer a vaccine without going

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through a five year process, but it should

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be based on free consent and full information.

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You should pay for it in one way or another.

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Also, sure, it shouldn't be free.

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It should not be pushed down the

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road, and you should be able to

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consult the medical professionals of your choice.

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Now, we have heard often talked about

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Ivomectin, which is but there's also the

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theory that HDR two vapors help.

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There is a pulmonologist in India who has

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been getting phenomenal results with an alternative treatment

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that has made it into the journals, but

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it's simply not being publicized to that extent.

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And again, it's a drug that's

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been around for over 100 years.

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So these treatments people should be able to access.

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And with vaccines, there was a denial of the

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after effects that were occurring and the vaccine ended

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up becoming like a reverse lot free.

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So in a normal lottery, it's like everybody spends $5

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and somebody wins a million dollars and we don't criticize

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or envy the person who wins a million dollars.

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We don't miss $5 when we lose them.

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But if it was reversed, if it was like somebody

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becomes bankrupt and loses a million dollars, but everybody gains

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$5 and that would be a reverse lottery.

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So everybody who has taken a vaccine, I

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believe is now excluding perhaps Omicron has much

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better immunity in terms of hospitalization rates and

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death rates are less among the vaccinated.

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But there were some who died.

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Lisa Shaw, the BBC presenter, died.

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There were people who got myocarditis pericarditis

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heart inflammation among the young, there were

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women whose periods have changed simply after

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the first dose of the vaccine.

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And those are highly frequent cases.

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And there was this breakthrough, which was the

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entire world media, except again, the South Korea

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Herald and the Times of India.

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The entire world has been silent on that

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because all the vaccine manufacturers said that the

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injection should be given in the muscle.

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So it's in the del priority muscle.

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Typically it's a large muscle with very

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low risk of hitting a blood vessel.

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But what doctors and nurses are trained to do

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is to aspirate before vaccinate when the recommendation is

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for the vaccine to be given in the muscle.

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And that means when they inject, when they

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insert the needle, they pull it back and

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check if there is any blood coming.

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If there is a blood vessel, they'll pull

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it out, discard the needle, start again.

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And that happens fairly rarely.

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That when they're aspirating they discover

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that they hit a blood vessel.

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But if they don't, aspirate they would never know

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if they've hit a blood vessel or not.

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And unfortunately, across all of these vaccination centers, Aspiration

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simply hasn't been asked for because they say, oh,

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it's highly unlikely, there are no major blood vessels,

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but highly unlikely is simply not good enough because

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these vaccines are very different.

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Both the Edenovirus AstraZenica vaccine and the

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mRNA vaccines like modern and FISA, essentially

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instruct your body to make spike protein.

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So they're making a key element of the disease rather

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than replicating the disease by giving you a weak virus

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or an attenuated virus or a dead virus.

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So the body then makes spike proteins and

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then the body makes antibodies against the spike

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protein which help against hospitalization and death if

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you get the real spike protein into you.

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And that comes with other things.

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So that the other problem with the vaccines is

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the efficacy starts to drop after six months.

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If you inject in a blood vessel, then

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the instructions are traveling across the body as

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against, localized primarily in the deltoid muscle where

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the spike protein happens, the antibodies happen and

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then the antibodies travel around the body.

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Only the antibodies of the travel, not instructions to

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make spike protein shouldn't go all over the place.

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So there is a study done on rats where two

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groups and a bunch of rats were injected deliberately into

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the way the same sort of Pfizer and whatever it

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might have been the enovirus estrogenica vaccine.

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And then a bunch of rats were

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given the vaccine in the muscle.

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So there were some cases

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of heart inflammation developed.

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So it was the mRNA vaccine.

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Heart inflammation did develop in the rats

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exclusively in the group that was given

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the IV intravenously, the injection intravenously.

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So we may have a situation where the vaccines have

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been blamed a little bit unfairly, but then there has

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been negligence on the part of the administration and they

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don't want to admit to that negligence.

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So they just simply suppressing this whole idea,

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which is incredibly bad because some people have

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suffered a lot and this is where the

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index of medical freedom comes in.

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You should be able to go to your doctor of

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your choice which is what I did when you're taking

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a vaccine and make sure that he asked for it

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before he vaccined it I made sure I got that

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for myself, my wife and my family and then we

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didn't suffer any horrendous after effects but that seems to

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be happening strangely enough, in the third world there's a

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combination of things maybe losing our freedoms in the third

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world you can walk into a surgeon and get into

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a specialist or a physician and get prescribed I will

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make and it was widely prescribed by the state government

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Ultra Pradesh but the state of arrest has suddenly introduced

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a travel restriction on a bunch of countries including the

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whole of the EU because of Omega and surprisingly the

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central government there as well as even the who in

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the United Nations have been criticizing the travel bans because

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they say they are unfair we ought to distribute the

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disease fairly and this is where Australia becomes quite an

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interesting case because let's look at the statistics now the

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world debts around 5,000,260.

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3 million cases now let's compare the debts per million

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average is 663 the United States is above that 2000

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and 389 the United Kingdom's 2000 and 134 New Zealand

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is 44 Australia 78 so pretty much at the other

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end of the scale India is 337 now you put

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the focus more on Australia again what do you find

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pretty high vaccination rates here now but an astonishing difference

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by state So out on the West Coast near Western

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Australia they're quite isolated it takes 4 hours by flight

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to get there from Sydney it's a big time zone

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difference as well and they practically have been able to

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prevent cases by lockdowns and travel bans and the travel

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Ban's have enabled them not to have lockdowns but then

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there is some freedom being infringed anyway the travel ban

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is an infringement federal government in Australia have been criticizing

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Tasmania and Western Australia for what they're doing is isolating

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themselves but their isolation has resulted in hardly any lockdowns

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people are freely able to move around and now the

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active cases in 2900 a day on average Victoria is

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almost 13,000 a day Western Australia is two not 2002

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active cases Tasmania is one new cases in Tasmania zero

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cases to date since the pandemic started 238 so even

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when you compare it on a per thousand population rate

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is very dramatically less than in other States but they

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have done so with another different kind of infringement but

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it's still I guess it's preferable to beating people on

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the street who are protesting living normally otherwise yeah two

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things I blame myself for I heard this story and

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I should have researched it and I will still do

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that but Dr Fauche himself visited this lab and US

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taxpayer money went to this lab for this COVID thing

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before it blew up, if you will so this is

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the Wuhan lab we're talking about.

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Yeah, the Wuhan lab.

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And I think that is just an abomination to be polite.

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Well, the United States government, we

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understand, funded the lab as well. Probably. Yes.

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Our text, arguably the purpose

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was to it's very ironical.

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It's what they call the gain of function research.

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So you actually make a virus a new form of virus,

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make it more virulent so that it will enable us to

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have vaccines and other treatments should a pandemic occur.

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But Ironically, that resulted in the pandemic occurring

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because there was a leak from the lab.

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Now, the benign story is the one

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of ignorance and therefore an inadvertent release.

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But the sinister story obviously

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is one that's a bioweapon. Yes.

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The vulnerability that I mentioned, even in the US,

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despite the constitutional protections and the bill arrives, the

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state of emergency powers to do all sorts of

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things that we are looking at today, prevent businesses

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from opening and lockdowns and prevent movement of people,

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lock up healthy people.

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In fact, that had never been done

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in human history before, except for those

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isolated incidents that we spoke about.

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Not so endemically.

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Well, if you wanted to make a bio weapon or

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you want to make a weapon to make the world

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compliant to kind of a new world order, this is

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the weapon one would think of because you can exploit

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the rights given to the States under the emergency powers.

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It will be that has happened.

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It's possible it's become rational

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to formulate conspiracy hypotheses.

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So the term conspiracy theory used to be

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used for a theory of a conspiracy.

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And the theory ranged from highly

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likely to mildly plausible to absurd.

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The whole range. Right.

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Whereas now it's become a demeaning term of some vehicles

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saying, well, I know the Earth is flat or the

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moon is made of cheese or some such wild thing.

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There is a Santa Claus. Yes.

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In fact, we are compelled, in fact, to

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formulate the hypothesis, to make sense of the

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world around us because we can see the

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establishment, the media are suppressing every alternate explanation

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of virtually anything and everything related to this,

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especially related to the pandemic.

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I'm sorry I interrupted you.

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But let me ask you this.

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Are you familiar with claws or Claus? Schultz.

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Schultz. Schwarz.

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You mean the great recent World

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Economic Forum and the great recent. Yes.

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I'm wondering if these things are related.

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This virus is released and all of a sudden the west,

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instead of standing by its principles, becomes lap dogs to this

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30 year plan or 20 year plan of his.

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And again, I'm not a conspiracy theorist, but

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on the scale of possible, probably certain.

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It's possible.

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It's entirely possible.

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And I think it's entirely rational.

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On the Savvy Street, we discussed that

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actually video interview of David Harriman.

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You obviously know of him.

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I watched that interview. Yeah.

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And we got a range of conspiracy.

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We got a range of conspiracy hypotheses,

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as we call them, to avoid the

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term that's become so maligned conspiracy theory.

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And also the fact that from a scientific standpoint of

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theory is a much stronger body of interrelated data and

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evidence that has filed up into a theory that sometimes

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the theory is something like a fact, like theory of

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gravity is still called the theory, but it's a fact.

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The theory of evolution is a fact. Yes, true.

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It's still called a theory where the

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hypothesis is clearly a conjecture that is

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put up for observation and discussion.

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And ideally, even the proponent of that hypothesis

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should be open to it being wrong.

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But we haven't been able to examine

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the origin of the virus, the outcome.

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So it is entirely possible that it was released a

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bio weapon with some aims, or it is also possible.

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The second part is more than possible.

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I mean, Schwab himself says so

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that the pandemic is an opportunity.

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So even if it wasn't in Burton released by the lab,

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they've certainly taken advantage of it and that they more than

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readily admit so in print on their own website. Yes.

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And again, the other thing I wanted to

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stress for many years, I've lamented what I

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call the permanent bureaucracy, which exists to serve

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itself and not answer to the people.

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And I think the administrative state is

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that is what the administrative state is.

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It's this permanent bureaucracy that you

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can't monolith or Leviathan that just

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keeps growing and feeding itself.

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What do you think of that?

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It's becoming worldwide.

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Notice we call it the deep straightened definition.

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It includes academia, media, think tanks.

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Philanthropy has gone in that direction.

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And unfortunately, a lot of large corporates, a lot of

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money is pouring in, even from corporates buying into the

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whole climate scam and ID of other scams, because big

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corporations are assisted by this crony face estate.

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And that's where the philanthropy and big corporations

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is where the money is coming from.

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So we have this network, which is we call it

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deep state, and it's controlling pretty much all the mainstream

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media, maybe over 90% of academia, 90% of academia.

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Yeah.

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Over 90% of think tanks as well. Sure.

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And these kind of NGO type organizations.

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And they become so powerful.

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I mean, to digress from Colbert, but staying

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in Australia for a minute again, because we

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said that would be our focus.

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Okay, we had this interesting

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thing happened here in 2009.

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There was a gentleman by the name Tony Abbott.

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He was a politician.

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He was in regional Victoria.

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And he said all this climate thing is absolute crap.

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Those were the words.

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He is absolute crap.

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But in a private meeting some years

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later, in 2013, he became Prime Minister.

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And then all of a sudden, he was playing games.

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He was dog whistling to his constituency.

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But he could never confront the what you

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would call climate alarmism or what Candace De

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Russi in 2009 called climate Scientology.

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He could not confront climate Scientologists

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or the media supporting them directly.

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Same thing happened.

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A gentleman by the name Scott Morrison.

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He was Treasurer in 2017, February 4.

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And a half years ago, he bought

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a lump of coal into Parliament.

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He is not allowed to have a prompt,

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but he nevertheless brought it and showed it.

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And he said, don't be afraid, just call.

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And he accused the opposition of colon

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phobia, a pathological fear of coal.

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That is beautiful speech.

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But then when he becomes Prime

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Minister, he became Prime Minister recently.

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He went to Glasgow and once again what he

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has done is played games and agreed to some

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wishy washy targets instead of any head on confrontation.

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So even Donald Trump wasn't a complete exception

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because when he became President, he asked the

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Department of Energy for a list of people

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who attended the climate conferences, five star junkets.

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So they refused.

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The Department of Energy, the Department of Agriculture,

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NASA, everybody worked in unison against Trump.

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So yes, he pulled the US out of the

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Paris Accord, but he didn't confront the scam head

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on by saying this climate thing is a scam.

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Climate alarmism is a scam.

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And I am thinking the deep state is so powerful

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and the politicians depend on campaign money to such a

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large extent that within the party there is quite a

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bit of revolt and especially in parliamentary democracies, if a

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Prime Minister was to confront it, he would get a

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revolt internally and he would be deposed by his own

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party, which can happen.

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And of course, even in the US, while the Republican

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Party can't pose Trump for simply disagreeing with him on

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policy matters, there is still a very strong influence that

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the deep state has over what the President can do.

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And then, of course, we now in the panic.

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What happened was Trump refused to exercise some of

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the powers he did have, but he could not

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stop the respective States from exercising, which is the

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floor we have in the model of that has

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been exploited virtually perfectly by the great reset proponents.

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If indeed it's deliberate or even if it is

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an very vigorous opportunistic reaction to what has happened.

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Be nice.

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Like two points before we wrap up, we probably

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will come back to, as I would call it,

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environmentalists as the new religion here at the Secular

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Foxhole and talk more about that and cover that.

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And also, if you would like a cliffhanger for an upcoming

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and returning guest, what do you see as a solution?

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Or how could we spread the good

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word about your work and so on?

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What's going on down under thank you.

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Well, this is a very difficult question because we

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are stymied by law and we got to have

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law to protect ourselves from law, or rather we

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got to have an enshrined ride in the Constitution

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to protect ourselves from lawmakers making new laws.

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But even in the US, regulation circumvent that process so

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we're not able to amend or in this time, in

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our time, we're not able to amend Constitutions.

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So what we have to do is wake people up

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and hopefully that starts to spread the word and we

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let the right sort of people into office.

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But it's a long, hard struggle.

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I can see that.

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It's just definitely a long struggle.

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So much is against us, unfortunately.

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Thank you for the sentiment, Martin, but I

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don't have any kind of magical solution other

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than speak up while we can.

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And as sort of media that are not major

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media, we fly secular Foxhole and Savvy Street flies

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well under the radar with those that become big,

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like YouTube was alternate media when it first started.

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Right now it's been co opted into the deep state.

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So that would be the danger for media that become

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bigger as to where the money is coming from to

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make it bigger and how it's going to prevent itself

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from being co opted into the deep state.

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We have some ideas for Claire and myself.

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I mean, we are not there yet because we have to

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get the funds and get like a budget and support.

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But for example, one alternative could be Rumble.

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I've tested to upload one video where

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took some time and so on.

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But I'm looking at that Amy peak of

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she recently did that with Blair and I.

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We have this new segment, sometimes some good things, not

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a good thing, and some ending with some good things.

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And that's originated by Amy Pikov.

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And the latest live streaming she had,

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it was on a new segment, some

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positive things about treatment against diabetes.

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And then she said that it

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was live streaming located on Rumble.

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So that's something to look at for the future.

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But if you want to do live stream,

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you have to have a certain account and

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then you have to have funds for that.

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But I see if a market will work freely.

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We will see alternative.

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But it's good to, as you said, point out that

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how some alternative or some startups is emerging or morphed

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into this big tech that is not for free market.

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It's something else.

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And that's why all about covet things.

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If you wanted to post something on Facebook and

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they say, are you really sure that you want

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to post this kind of information with post?

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This is starting getting a bit scary.

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It's this big brother watching you over,

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but then you could vote with your

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wallet pocketbook and go somewhere, somewhere elsewhere.

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Rumble and Odyssey are, from what I've heard,

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probably the freest of the new competitors to

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YouTube and posting the most alternate narrative.

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I think that's true, yes.

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And that's why we continue with our podcast.

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We could be corrected and we could be

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having a discourse and debate and discussion.

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But I like it's pretty hard.

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Maybe you shouldn't say that out loud, but it's pretty

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hard to close down an RSS feed, you could be

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deplatformed, you could be stopped or picked out.

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But still, even real conspiracy fears is still

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out there because they have a saver RSS

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feed and I don't like them.

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But I'm for the freedom of expression also.

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But they have to take the consequences of what

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we are spreading and be responsible for that.

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But if you have an RSS feed

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and you could protect it pretty easily.

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And what we want to do in the

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future is to get support by fellow podcasters

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and listeners, by something called Podcasting 20 and

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that's initiative from folks at Podcast Index.org.

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And there is something called Satoshi, and

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that's like 100 million parts of Bitcoin.

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So it's a small amount, but then you

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could stream Satoshi's through by listening to podcasts

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if you use a Podcasting 20 application.

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So there I see it.

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But right now I think it's a couple

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of thousands of podcasters of like 4 million

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podcasts all over the world using this.

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But you could look in the Crystal ball.

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So in ten years time, when we talk again, fantastic.

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When you mentioned it yourself, I was about to call it

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the Bitcoin of sound or the Bitcoin of free expression.

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Is sound preserved in

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disaggregated leisure type entities.

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You're calling podcasts to point out the

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platform cannot be taken out, hopefully and

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cannot be prevented from being listened to.

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But one of the problems we've had is

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even where people have been going back to

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Pandemic have been protesting in Greece.

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They recently passed a law making

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vaccination compulsory for people about 60.

Speaker:

And they've been in Australia, the protests, we met violence

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from the police, but where they weren't met with violence

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from the police in France and Germany, the nation state

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still went ahead as if the protest hadn't happened and

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legislated the way they wanted to.

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So despite the expression, the alternate media

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is simply not large enough to sway

Speaker:

significant amount of opinion yet.

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And hopefully we will be some days.

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I know we will be.

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I want to end on a positive note, though, if I may.

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1 of my favorite movies of

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all time came out of Australia.

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It's called The Dish with Sam Neil.

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All right. I must have been a fan.

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I haven't seen it, but gone.

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It takes place in the 1960s when the United States

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put a satellite dish for NASA in this big sheep

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field in the middle of some Prairieland in Australia.

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And it's about the three guys that made

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this satellite station and the town around it.

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And it's a classic, feel good, wonderful film.

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So I highly recommend that to you and to our listeners.

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Anyway, we've been talking to Venice ColeHead Carr, who is

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always welcome to come to the show, and we thank

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him again for Manning the Foxhole with us today.

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Thank you for having me again. Yes.

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If you have any ending note or if you want

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to say where the listener could find you in cyberspace.

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You're more welcome. Thank you. Well, yeah.

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I hope listeners fund use the secular foxhole

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podcast and us savvy street by visiting our

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websites and at least keeping us alive.

Speaker:

And ideally they were looking for major sponsors

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who take us to the next step where

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it's to fly under the radar.

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But we'll move it bigger.

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We dropped a few bombs by far.

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That's right.

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Throwing stones.

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And then hopefully we get some machine

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guns and then maybe we fly.

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We're not afraid to speak truth to power but

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we need a bigger platform, that's for sure.

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That's right.

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And as Blair knows without saying anything now

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I have some ideas and I've been talking

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with some interesting entrepreneurs about that so we

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will probably come back to that Vinay. Very good.

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Thank you. All right, sir.

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That's a wrap, I believe.

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Yes, it is. All right.