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Creating products to support causes you care about - with Elizabeth Rees - Eliza Eliza
Episode 1327th October 2022 • Bring Your Product Idea to Life • Vicki Weinberg
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Today on the podcast I'm speaking with Elizabeth Rees, the founder of Eliza Eliza. 

Eliza Eliza is a bag and accessories brand based in Cardiff, Wales, aiming to empower you to start conversations about the causes you care about. The hashtag Elizabeth uses for her business is Carry Your Cause. 

We spoke about the causes that Elizabeth supports through her business, how she does that, how she's formed partnerships, as well as all the details about how she designs and creates her products. We also talked about the merits of selling on Etsy Vs on your own website, and how Elizabeth is driving people to her website for sales.

There is lots to inspire you, and some great thoughtful advice to take away and use in your own business.

Listen in to hear Elizabeth share:

  • An introduction to herself and her business (01:15)
  • How she started making bags (01:43)
  • Why she decided to turn making bags into a business (03:39)
  • Why she uses hemp to make her bags, and its sustainable properties (07:44)
  • How she started selling on Etsy (16:36)
  • Her first collaboration with a charity (17:09)
  • The V Collection and working with more charities (19:46)
  • How she found fabric designers (23:00)
  • How Gillian Anderson & Emily Clarkson came to share the bags (27:23)
  • Moving from Etsy to her own website (28:49)
  • How she attracts people to her website (31:35)
  • What has worked and hasn’t worked on social media (34:46)
  • Using an accountability partner (38:00)
  • Her number one piece of advice for other product creators (40:30)

USEFUL RESOURCES:

Eliza Eliza Website

Eliza Eliza Twitter

Eliza Eliza Instagram

Eliza Eliza Facebook 

Spoonflower

Podcast: Happier with Gretchen Rubin

Female Entrepreneur Association

Charities Mentioned

Unseen

The Eve Appeal

LET’S CONNECT

Join my free Facebook group for product makers and creators

Find me on Instagram

Work with me

Mentioned in this episode:

Book an Amazon mini strategy session

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Transcripts

Speaker:

Welcome to the Bring Your Product Ideas to Life podcast, practical advice

Speaker:

and inspiration to help you create and sell your own physical products.

Speaker:

Here's your host, Vicki Weinberg.

Vicki Weinberg:

Hi.

Vicki Weinberg:

So today I'm speaking with Elizabeth Rees, the founder of Eliza Eliza.

Vicki Weinberg:

Eliza Eliza is a bag and accessories brand based in Cardiff, Wales, aiming

Vicki Weinberg:

to empower you to start conversations about the causes you care about.

Vicki Weinberg:

And the hashtag Elizabeth uses for her business is Carry your Cause.

Vicki Weinberg:

So we spoke a lot about the causes that Elizabeth supports through her

Vicki Weinberg:

business, um, how she does that, how she's formed partnerships, um, as well

Vicki Weinberg:

as of course all the details about how she designs and creates her products.

Vicki Weinberg:

I thought this was interesting.

Vicki Weinberg:

A fascinating conversation as they all are um, Elizabeth is probably the guest

Vicki Weinberg:

that I've spoken to the most about the causes she supports and how she does that.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, and I found it all super interesting and I really hope you do to.

Vicki Weinberg:

So I would love now to introduce you to Elizabeth.

Vicki Weinberg:

Well, hi, thank you so much for being here.

Elizabeth Rees:

Hi Vicki.

Vicki Weinberg:

So could we start by you please giving an introduction to yourself,

Vicki Weinberg:

your business, and what you sell.

Elizabeth Rees:

Thank you so much for inviting me on the podcast.

Elizabeth Rees:

So I'm Elizabeth Rees and I'm founder and, um, owner of Eliza Eliza.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and I make sustainably conscious bags and accessories that aim

Elizabeth Rees:

to start conversations about the causes that we all care about.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, so that's anything from dermatological cancer to gender equality

Elizabeth Rees:

and endangered turtles, many more.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you and I'm, I'm right in thinking

Vicki Weinberg:

aren't I that you make your bags?

Elizabeth Rees:

I do.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yes.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, so I, I've, I've always started, um, made bags myself, um, and

Elizabeth Rees:

I I, um, I started making them when I was on maternity leave.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and I needed a, I wanted something to keep my nappies and wet wipes and bits and

Elizabeth Rees:

pieces in when I was out and about, rather than taking a massive, changing bag.

Elizabeth Rees:

So I, I'd done a bit of sewing in the past, um, and decided to make a, a small

Elizabeth Rees:

pouch with some fabric that I found, um, and just used it to, to carry the nappies

Elizabeth Rees:

in between my change bags and, and put an or put under the, the buggy just to have

Elizabeth Rees:

little bit less to carry out and about.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah, but I make them all myself.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes, that makes total sense because those big

Vicki Weinberg:

change, I think the big changing bags just kind of, there's something about

Vicki Weinberg:

them that just makes you want to fill them because they're, they're so big.

Vicki Weinberg:

It all works the other way, doesn't it?

Vicki Weinberg:

You put so much in there because you can.

Elizabeth Rees:

Oh, absolutely.

Elizabeth Rees:

And if I've got a bag, I mean, my mum, she, I think we, it's a joke in our

Elizabeth Rees:

family that I always had a bag with me when I was younger, and however

Elizabeth Rees:

big it is, I will always fill it.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I think when, especially when you're a first time mum, you, you

Elizabeth Rees:

just fill your changing bag with everything you might just need.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and you'll put an extra couple of nappies in there even though

Elizabeth Rees:

you'll never need them really.

Elizabeth Rees:

And muslins galore and, um, but yeah.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, Um, yeah, it was just really useful to, um, have this little pouch, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

that I could carry around with me.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I, uh, a lot of people started commenting on how useful they were and

Elizabeth Rees:

so I'd make, make some of them maybe.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and it just started from there.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

So that leads me really nicely.

Vicki Weinberg:

So what inspired you to start Eliza, Eliza?

Vicki Weinberg:

Because obviously it sounds like, first of all, you were making bags

Vicki Weinberg:

for yourself and maybe for friends.

Vicki Weinberg:

So what inspired you to actually start a business?

Elizabeth Rees:

So going right back before I, I had children, I actually, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

came in a background of, um, teaching.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, um, I'm trained as a secondary geography teacher, and when I

Elizabeth Rees:

went on my maternity leave, I.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, um, I wanted something a bit extra to do just to keep myself busy.

Elizabeth Rees:

And my friends had told me about this Roald Dahl fabric and it, it is a

Elizabeth Rees:

beautiful print and I started making these cushions and selling them online, sell,

Elizabeth Rees:

selling them through Etsy and they were, they were cushions with pockets in them.

Elizabeth Rees:

You put the books in, um, and it snowballed and started growing.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, because I'd done that, um, sewing, I'd made these bags and, um, because I

Elizabeth Rees:

realized that the pocket cushions couldn't really grow into a business long term.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and, um, to a scale that I would like to, because I didn't

Elizabeth Rees:

really want to go back to teaching.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, I.

Elizabeth Rees:

Understood that it wasn't a passion that I wanted, I had, um, and wanted

Elizabeth Rees:

to do for the rest of my life.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, so yeah, so I started, I'd been selling these cushions online

Elizabeth Rees:

and through Etsy in marketplaces.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and I, sorry, I lost my train of thought.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, found this hole in area world online that I never really knew existed.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, Started making the bags and wanted to, um, go down another business route.

Elizabeth Rees:

Sorry, I've really lost my train of thought here.

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, that's no problem at all.

Vicki Weinberg:

We were talking about, so you started off selling, so that was amazing.

Vicki Weinberg:

So that was before you even had this business.

Vicki Weinberg:

That was just you, was it just selling the cushions, um, so something completely

Vicki Weinberg:

separate to what you're doing now really?

Vicki Weinberg:

Even though it sounds like it's the start of it.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yes, it was.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's, it's, it's, I suppose this was 10 years ago, uh, so nine years ago with

Elizabeth Rees:

my first son, so it's been a very long journey to get into where I am now.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and I've had two other children since.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, so yeah, the, the bags I, I, I've been making these pouches, um, decided

Elizabeth Rees:

I wanted, um, to grow the business.

Elizabeth Rees:

Went online to, to see what other fabrics I could use.

Elizabeth Rees:

I really wanted to find a linen fabric perhaps, um, to have something

Elizabeth Rees:

with a bit more, um, that could be used with different, um, outfits.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and I found this beautiful hemp that was woven in the UK and I love the idea

Elizabeth Rees:

of it being British, um, and sustainable.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and, and actually when, when I first saw the, the cost of the, the fabric

Elizabeth Rees:

per meter, I was like, Oh my goodness.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's . It's very expensive.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but I.

Elizabeth Rees:

I'll just go for it, see how it turned out.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I loved it and started using them as all the, like all the time.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, because they could go with any outfit.

Elizabeth Rees:

When you're a mother, it's, you want something that's nice and easy, so

Elizabeth Rees:

having a bag that I could just pick up and use, um, to go down to the pub with

Elizabeth Rees:

my friends or go out and about just to pop to the shops was just so useful.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and the, what's really good about the, the hemp as well is that it's,

Elizabeth Rees:

it's quite hard wearing as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

You can throw it around, throw it in, um, in the bag.

Elizabeth Rees:

In your bag.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and I could use it to organize my bag as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

I don't know much about hemp actually.

Vicki Weinberg:

So what, um, this might be a really silly question, but what was, what other

Vicki Weinberg:

fabric would you say hemp is most like?

Vicki Weinberg:

Because I'm trying to think.

Vicki Weinberg:

I don't think I've ever seen it, other than seen it with your

Vicki Weinberg:

products online, but in real life I don't think I've seen a hemp bag.

Vicki Weinberg:

So, um, is it like a canvasing kind of material?

Elizabeth Rees:

It is.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah, you can, you, It's slightly from we.

Elizabeth Rees:

So the hemp I use is actually a mix of hemp and cotton.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, it's, it's a lot more hemp.

Elizabeth Rees:

Hemp is a, is a very, it can be quite a rough, um, fabric, depends

Elizabeth Rees:

on how it's processed and there's lots of different types of hemp.

Elizabeth Rees:

Unfortunately hemps get a really bad, it gets really bad press

Elizabeth Rees:

because it has an association with marijuana and it's actually made

Elizabeth Rees:

from the cannabis sativa, um, plant.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but it's a completely different fab, um, species to the marijuana.

Elizabeth Rees:

So it contains, it doesn't contain any like psychoactive um, chemicals.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's the THC that is the, what makes you get high if, if you use marijuana, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

but hemp hasn't got those properties.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but the actual fabric is, you might find it a little bit rougher,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, and, and textured initially, but it does soften over time.

Elizabeth Rees:

And actually, um, it's with the, the improvement of processing of hemp, it

Elizabeth Rees:

does mean that we can use it for, um, things like shirts and um, as a more

Elizabeth Rees:

delicate or, or, um, clothing accessories that need more delicate fabrics,

Elizabeth Rees:

which is really good because hemp is just the most wonderful, um, fibre.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's, it's one of the most sustainable, um, fabrics that we've got and

Elizabeth Rees:

we know in, in, um, the world because it uses a lot less water.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, it's, it almost grows like a weed.

Elizabeth Rees:

You can grow it almost anywhere in the world.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but it's just got this association with marijuana, which has meant that it's

Elizabeth Rees:

how it's been held back in how we can grow it and where we can grow it in the world.

Vicki Weinberg:

It sounds like the hemp grain for fabric,

Vicki Weinberg:

for example, is different.

Vicki Weinberg:

Is, is that right?

Vicki Weinberg:

It's a different plant.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's, it's a different species.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, although, um, I mean this is my very, what I've learned over time,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, which is, can be very basic, but, um, yeah, it's different to marijuana.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's, it's got different properties, I think it's something like hemp THC

Elizabeth Rees:

is, has got to be under like 0.3%.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, anything over that is, is deemed illegal to grow.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and, and even hemp itself in the uk, you need to get special license

Elizabeth Rees:

from the home office to, to grow it.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and they're really hard to, to get hold of, really expensive.

Elizabeth Rees:

You have to, the farms have to be vetted depending on their size and the location.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but it is improving and I think there's more understanding on, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

on how useful hemp can be and what it can be used for and because it

Elizabeth Rees:

has so many environmental properties.

Elizabeth Rees:

Or positives.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, it's um, it's been used and, and discovered more and

Elizabeth Rees:

more on how useful it can be.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's really interesting.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you for sharing that because I knew nothing about it, and I think

Vicki Weinberg:

it's really great that you can source it in the UK as well, because that's

Vicki Weinberg:

not always the case for fabric.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah, I mean the hemp I use, um, it's, it's Romanian and um,

Elizabeth Rees:

French hemp, and then they bring it over to here because there are so many

Elizabeth Rees:

problems of growing hemp in the country.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, they bring it over and it's woven in Lancaster and, and Yorkshire.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and like I said, it is woven with a cotton, organic cotton as well, so

Elizabeth Rees:

that it does help keep it a bit slightly softer than if you just used hemp,

Elizabeth Rees:

but the hope is that eventually they will use hemp growing in this country.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's, it's just so, so difficult.

Elizabeth Rees:

In fact, I mean, hemp goes back, it's one of the oldest fabrics known to man,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, and women, um, it's, um, they've, they've used it for years and years.

Elizabeth Rees:

Years.

Elizabeth Rees:

I mean, I think there's, um, it's been found te, um, 8,000 years

Elizabeth Rees:

ago, I think is the oldest piece of fabric that's been found.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and that was hemp.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, it, it's been used, um, in the UK very much for rope and sales

Elizabeth Rees:

as the British grew their empire.

Elizabeth Rees:

There was a huge push to grow hemp.

Elizabeth Rees:

In fact, I think it at one point there was a time where it was illegal

Elizabeth Rees:

not to grow hemp and all farmers had to produce a certain amount

Elizabeth Rees:

of hemp on, on their farming land.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but then, Because there'd been associations with marijuana it was

Elizabeth Rees:

all made illegal, um, in the early 19th century, the 20th century.

Elizabeth Rees:

And it wasn't legalized again until, I think it was about the 1990s.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but yeah, it's, it's, it's, I mean, it's, the more I find out

Elizabeth Rees:

about the, the more I love it.

Elizabeth Rees:

And it's, it's got so many, um, properties which make it, uh, great as a bag because

Elizabeth Rees:

it's so bacterial, it's an antifungal.

Elizabeth Rees:

So with anything like a bag or clothes, it's great for it.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's not, if it gets dirty, it almost cleans itself.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's self cleaning.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, which is really useful.

Elizabeth Rees:

And then there's so many other things that can be useful.

Elizabeth Rees:

I mean, I've heard they've made, they've made bricks from hemp.

Elizabeth Rees:

It can be.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's amazing.

Vicki Weinberg:

It is.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's, um, they can, they can use it for, I mean, I suppose

Elizabeth Rees:

there's other, um, because of so many properties it has and it, in the nutrients

Elizabeth Rees:

it has, it can be ingested as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

So it can be, um, you might have seen the oil in supermarkets.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and so every part of the plant can be used effectively, which is another

Elizabeth Rees:

reason why it's such a useful, um, proper, um, farming, um, and agricultural.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um.

Vicki Weinberg:

I know what you mean.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah because I see what you can tell.

Vicki Weinberg:

It sounds like there's just no waste, which is fantastic because with most

Vicki Weinberg:

parts of, it's like some element of waste.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah.

Elizabeth Rees:

They can use it, the rotation crop as well, which, because it almost puts

Elizabeth Rees:

nutrients back into, I mean, I don't know, complete the science of it, but

Elizabeth Rees:

it puts nutrients back into the, to land, which is obviously fantastic

Elizabeth Rees:

and, and means that it's, it's, it's, um, as a farm, it's not an area of

Elizabeth Rees:

land that's being left to do nothing.

Elizabeth Rees:

It can be making money while it's, um, it's adding nutrients

Elizabeth Rees:

into the, the soils again.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah.

Elizabeth Rees:

And it's, um, the other thing is, I mean, it, it acts as a carbon sink, so it, it

Elizabeth Rees:

takes in a lot more carbondioxide, than many trees do, um, which is fantastic

Elizabeth Rees:

for the, um, reducing climate change.

Elizabeth Rees:

And, um, yeah, it's, it's a wonder, it's a wonder.

Elizabeth Rees:

The more I find out about it the better and the more I want to use it, and I,

Elizabeth Rees:

I would love to one day just use hemp.

Elizabeth Rees:

I mean, that would be the, the ideal situation.

Elizabeth Rees:

If, if, um, because at the moment, I still use cotton, um, for where

Elizabeth Rees:

my, because I have design printed onto to cotton to use on the linings

Elizabeth Rees:

of, of my bags and, and accessories.

Elizabeth Rees:

But one day it would be amazing if they were made from hemp.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, that's the ideal situation.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah, and we'll talk a bit bit more about the linings of your

Vicki Weinberg:

products later as well, because they are obviously very unique . Um, and we'll

Vicki Weinberg:

talk about those and the causes that you are supporting for your products as well.

Vicki Weinberg:

So it does sound like it's an ideal product for, for making bags.

Vicki Weinberg:

Mm-hmm.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, so once you found a fabric that you were, wanted to work with and you

Vicki Weinberg:

were excited to use, so what happened?

Vicki Weinberg:

So what happened then?

Vicki Weinberg:

Talk us through, um, you just started making bags and then you

Vicki Weinberg:

found the hemp, what happened next?

Elizabeth Rees:

So I, um, I started selling them through Etsy again,

Elizabeth Rees:

and for a long time I, I sold them through, um, online and Etsy.

Elizabeth Rees:

And the reason I.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, the line was, um, I used patterns.

Elizabeth Rees:

I to, to be honest, I, I didn't have many plain fabrics, , so I

Elizabeth Rees:

just started using what I had, and so I used the fabrics inside and I

Elizabeth Rees:

suppose maybe it was just an instinct.

Elizabeth Rees:

I wanted to be able to give back.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, I, I found this attraction towards raising a bit of money

Elizabeth Rees:

initially for a charity as part of, um, of producing the, the bags.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I discovered, uh, the first charity I started working with was, um, a

Elizabeth Rees:

charity called Unseen, and they work with survivors of Modern Day Slavery.

Elizabeth Rees:

They are based in Bristol.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I approached them and said, oh, please, can I just work with

Elizabeth Rees:

you, partner with you and, and help raise some money for you.

Elizabeth Rees:

And they, uh, were more than happy to, um, work with me.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and then it must have been about six months later, a year later, I, I,

Elizabeth Rees:

I said, well, well, I'd love to do is perhaps make the, the, the line and

Elizabeth Rees:

the, the design a bit more meaningful.

Elizabeth Rees:

So I, I said that I, I def I'd, um, would look for some, an artist that could

Elizabeth Rees:

perhaps put together a design that would be, would relate to what they were doing.

Elizabeth Rees:

And we, we had a lot of ideas.

Elizabeth Rees:

We discussed things that we could, um, focus on the design, but what unseen

Elizabeth Rees:

really like to do is, is promote the, the positives of what they are doing

Elizabeth Rees:

as a, a charity rather than looking back to the, the slavery point.

Elizabeth Rees:

The, I actually use butterflies as part of that um, collection.

Elizabeth Rees:

And the reason being is because they have a brilliant programme called The

Elizabeth Rees:

Butterfly Programme, and it works on, um, with Safe Houses for Women, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

and helps support women, gives them, um, help with counseling, with, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

integration back into communities.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, it, it almost, maybe just giving them a pack of, um, of

Elizabeth Rees:

clothes or, um, um, toiletries when they come into this safe house.

Elizabeth Rees:

All the list of things we don't really tend to think about because many of these

Elizabeth Rees:

women have perhaps come over to this country if they've been trafficked over

Elizabeth Rees:

from another country and have nothing else apart from the clothes that they're

Elizabeth Rees:

wearing when they are rescued, uh, so the Safe Houses work with these women

Elizabeth Rees:

and it's called the Butterfly Programme.

Elizabeth Rees:

So that's why I've used butterflies.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and yeah, it's, it just went from, then I, I think the second charity

Elizabeth Rees:

was the Eve appeal, which you've probably seen, um, if you, my Eve

Elizabeth Rees:

appeal, um, collection is called the V collection and has, um, vulvas inside.

Elizabeth Rees:

And the reason being is because, Eve Appeal, um, worked to raise awareness

Elizabeth Rees:

for the five gynecological cancers, um, which I will remind because I remind

Elizabeth Rees:

everyone what they are because a lot of people don't realize there's five cancers.

Elizabeth Rees:

So there's a variant, cervical wound, vaginal and volvo.

Elizabeth Rees:

And the idea with the V collection is that it raises, um, awareness

Elizabeth Rees:

and starts conversations.

Elizabeth Rees:

A lot of people might look at the vulvas and feel like they're a bit

Elizabeth Rees:

explicit, but to me the idea is that it starts that conversation and that's

Elizabeth Rees:

the most important part of what the bags or I hope that the bags do.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and then on the side, they, they also raise, raise

Elizabeth Rees:

money for the charity as well.

Vicki Weinberg:

Those were the designs I actually, when I was looking at

Vicki Weinberg:

your products, I mean, first started speaking, those were the ones that

Vicki Weinberg:

really stood out to me because they are really unique and really eye catching.

Vicki Weinberg:

So I can see they're definitely conversations starters.

Vicki Weinberg:

I can definitely see that if you have that bag, someone might say,

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, what does that, what's that for?

Vicki Weinberg:

What does that mean?

Vicki Weinberg:

So I think, yeah, it's def, I think it will definitely be achieving

Vicki Weinberg:

that as, as well as, as you say, raising some money as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

Mm-hmm.

Elizabeth Rees:

The V collection, I mean, it's certainly my most popular, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

collection because I think it is the one that stands out from the rest.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, it's the one that's, um, in the past, it's been shared by Jillian Anderson,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, and influencers Emily Clarkson shared it um, when she, she brought it.

Elizabeth Rees:

I made these masks in, in lockdown because one of the reasons I had it inside the

Elizabeth Rees:

bag as well was I thought it would be.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's, it's almost like a, it's, it's not, it's um, oh, it's like

Elizabeth Rees:

a secret it being in the bag, but it doesn't, it's not showing off

Elizabeth Rees:

that you can show it to whoever you want and start the conversation.

Elizabeth Rees:

It doesn't have to be completely out there.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but then when I started doing face masks, um, a couple of years ago,

Elizabeth Rees:

post lockdown um, people would quite happily wear them on their faces.

Elizabeth Rees:

And, but I think the design isn't, I mean, even my mum

Elizabeth Rees:

thought they were, they were bugs.

Elizabeth Rees:

I think It's not obvious that they are.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's one of those 'Are they?

Elizabeth Rees:

Are they what I think they are?' And this, they're lots

Elizabeth Rees:

different designs, uh, colours.

Elizabeth Rees:

So it means um, it sort of represents everyone.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and it's, yeah, just starts conversations.

Elizabeth Rees:

And, uh.

Vicki Weinberg:

So I will make sure I put a link to your shop in the show notes.

Vicki Weinberg:

People can actually go take a look at this design because obviously

Vicki Weinberg:

we are talking about it a lot, it's actually good to go and see it now.

Vicki Weinberg:

So, did you find an artist to work with to come up with these designs for you?

Elizabeth Rees:

So I, I first, well, the, the, um, the, the vulva collection,

Elizabeth Rees:

when I did that, it was be, um, I'd actually found the design before I

Elizabeth Rees:

approached The Eve Appeal and the artists.

Elizabeth Rees:

I found I worked quite a lot with a fabric product, uh, producer called

Elizabeth Rees:

Spoonflower, and they print onto fabrics and you can, there's lots of different,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, fabric types you print onto.

Elizabeth Rees:

So I print onto like an organic cotton satin.

Elizabeth Rees:

You can print on to, um, I suppose like, um, polycottons or

Elizabeth Rees:

um, heavier canvases and, yeah, because it's smaller quantities.

Elizabeth Rees:

So you go into Spoonflower and you, there's all these different designs

Elizabeth Rees:

you can, you can choose from.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I, I happen to come across this vulva design and so I approached the artist

Elizabeth Rees:

and asked her, she's based, is a, a lady called Teysha and she's based in Canada.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, which is another reason it's brilliant, because you can use

Elizabeth Rees:

people from all over the world.

Elizabeth Rees:

And what's really good about using Spoonflower is that every time I buy from

Elizabeth Rees:

Spoonflower, the artist gets a percentage of that, um, which is really good as well

Elizabeth Rees:

if you are, um, not wanting to buy the rights straight out, um, from an artist

Elizabeth Rees:

because sometimes with the artists you'll buy the rights to use their designs.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but whereas with Spoonflower, you just pay every time you use their design

Elizabeth Rees:

if you have an agreement with them.

Elizabeth Rees:

And, and I, and I think the fact that I could turn around to Teysha

Elizabeth Rees:

and say it's going to help raise awareness, it's going to, um, help,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, raise money for my charity.

Elizabeth Rees:

I think that was another, another reason why she was more than

Elizabeth Rees:

happy for me to start like that.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and, and yeah, I mean, I, I think last time I looked it, it, the collection,

Elizabeth Rees:

it's raised over 3000 pounds for The Eve Appeal, um, and, and so, yeah,

Elizabeth Rees:

the, I think the artists are really, really encouraging and wanting, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

to, for me to use their designs because it's, it's giving back in a way that,

Elizabeth Rees:

that they want to support as well.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's amazing.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think, yeah, that's really lovely that you are able to support an

Vicki Weinberg:

artist and support charity and yeah, this is really nice, isn't it?

Vicki Weinberg:

How mm-hmm.

Vicki Weinberg:

, how that works.

Vicki Weinberg:

So where with this, um, the site.

Vicki Weinberg:

I guess the only downside is does that mean potentially other people could use

Vicki Weinberg:

the same designs that you are using?

Elizabeth Rees:

Oh, absolutely.

Elizabeth Rees:

And, and, and I and I, I don't want to keep secret over, um, using Spoonflower

Elizabeth Rees:

because I think if you want to, then yes, they can go and use, I mean, I

Elizabeth Rees:

have an agreement with the artists to use the designs on a commercial

Elizabeth Rees:

side, and I think it's important that people understand even just for a

Elizabeth Rees:

matter of politeness that is important.

Elizabeth Rees:

They go and ask an artist if they can use it, if they're not

Elizabeth Rees:

using it just for personal use.

Elizabeth Rees:

But yeah, I mean, if you, if you, if you go into Spoonflower and search

Elizabeth Rees:

anything, it's, it's, I love, I mean, it's a brilliant site and I, I think

Elizabeth Rees:

they're really supportive of artists, um, and, and project makers alike.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah, it sounds like it's great that you were able to contact

Vicki Weinberg:

the artist directly, so it wasn't like a platform in between you and her.

Vicki Weinberg:

Mm-hmm.

Vicki Weinberg:

That sounds like that's really nice because there are lots of sites out

Vicki Weinberg:

there where there's sort of a disconnect between you and the person who's

Vicki Weinberg:

created the art or what the design or wherever it is so this sounds really

Vicki Weinberg:

nice that you could sort of actually speak to the artist and tell her

Vicki Weinberg:

what you were using it for and yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

I, I really like that aspect of it.

Elizabeth Rees:

Mm-hmm.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah.

Elizabeth Rees:

No, I, I mean actually all of the, um, the designs I, I print, I, I

Elizabeth Rees:

use Spoonflower and quite a few of them I found through Spoonflower.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but like I said, it means that you can, you can access people who are, I

Elizabeth Rees:

think, um, the lady that, um, Angelique who produces my turtle fabrics, she's

Elizabeth Rees:

based in South Africa and I might never have known about her if I,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, hadn't been on, on Spoonflower.

Elizabeth Rees:

So it's really useful.

Vicki Weinberg:

And so you mentioned earlier about people, um, you mentioned

Vicki Weinberg:

Gillian Anderson and Emily Clarkson sort of sharing your products.

Vicki Weinberg:

So was that something deliberate that you were trying to get, um, influencers

Vicki Weinberg:

or people to use your products?

Vicki Weinberg:

Or is that something that happened organically?

Vicki Weinberg:

I'm just being curious and is it, um.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah, no, both by accident really.

Elizabeth Rees:

So, um, Gillian Anderson had been a gift for a, um, a, a friend.

Elizabeth Rees:

Was going to see a show she'd done and I sort of said 'Oh, can you just see if you

Elizabeth Rees:

can give her this, um, purse?' Um, never thinking, well, I thought I was hoping

Elizabeth Rees:

she might make, share it on a story, but she did the post on it in the end, which

Elizabeth Rees:

was brilliant for me on the, on Instagram.

Elizabeth Rees:

So it meant it stayed there forever.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and, and it is, it is incredible when, if you, if you have an influencer with

Elizabeth Rees:

a, a good following, it's incredible the difference it can make as a business.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and it just, it kicked off completely overnight and I sold out and it was

Elizabeth Rees:

wonderful with Emily Clarkson and that was, she'd actually bought the

Elizabeth Rees:

face mask herself because she works quite closely with The EVA Appeal and

Elizabeth Rees:

she'd seen them promote the face mask.

Elizabeth Rees:

So that was, that was wonderful.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and that was really nice because she'd bought the mask herself

Elizabeth Rees:

and then, and then shared it.

Vicki Weinberg:

That is really nice.

Vicki Weinberg:

And so at this, what, at what stage were you selling on your

Vicki Weinberg:

own website as well as on Etsy?

Vicki Weinberg:

Were you, were you.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

When did that happen?

Elizabeth Rees:

So, fairly early on I switched to my own website.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, I, I'd been speaking to, um, a friend of mine and she, she almost,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, encouraged me to, to switch to a website, um, rather than using Etsy.

Elizabeth Rees:

Uh, and I, I, I actually started using Squarespace cuz I mean, it's,

Elizabeth Rees:

first it's very easy to, they've got all these templates and you,

Elizabeth Rees:

you just almost, um, and I, having, coming from a background, which I.

Elizabeth Rees:

Wasn't very technically, uh, educated.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, it was much easier for me to, to be able to just put in pictures and a bit

Elizabeth Rees:

of text and, and the information that was needed and upload it straight away.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, so I would encourage anyone to, to use anything like Squarespace to,

Elizabeth Rees:

if they wanted to start a website.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, Etsy is really useful I think when you initially start.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and, um, a great way to, to get your, to dip your feet in to,

Elizabeth Rees:

to dip your foot in, so to speak.

Elizabeth Rees:

But I think a website, it's yours, it's your website.

Elizabeth Rees:

It, um, no one can take it away from you.

Elizabeth Rees:

Whereas I think with something like Etsy or any other marketplace, they have

Elizabeth Rees:

full control over everything you do.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, they can decide what they're showing.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and I think it's, it's just more of a professional feel when you've

Elizabeth Rees:

got your, your own website as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, I think when I promote my website, it feels, yeah, a lot more professional

Elizabeth Rees:

and I still use obviously things like Instagram and Twitter and Facebook to

Elizabeth Rees:

help promote, um, my bags and accessories.

Elizabeth Rees:

But everything goes to the website now and.

Vicki Weinberg:

Oh, so that's really interesting because when you launched your

Vicki Weinberg:

website did you turn off Etsy completely?

Elizabeth Rees:

Uh, I think I even still have an Etsy store somewhere.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, so I don't think it's turned off completely, but yeah, I certainly don't,

Elizabeth Rees:

I don't direct people anymore to any Etsy.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes sense.

Vicki Weinberg:

I mean, I think for all the reasons you shared.

Vicki Weinberg:

And also let's face it, it's also for you much more profitable to sell on a

Vicki Weinberg:

website than it is to pay any marketplace.

Vicki Weinberg:

You know, when you have the fees and.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

Everything else.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, and one thing I am curious about though is did you find it hard to

Vicki Weinberg:

sort of get people to your website?

Vicki Weinberg:

Because on, I think on a, on a platform like Etsy or any other online

Vicki Weinberg:

marketplace obviously people are there to shop, they go in there and they're

Vicki Weinberg:

going in the search for and looking for whatever they are looking for.

Vicki Weinberg:

Mm-hmm.

Vicki Weinberg:

Did you find it like you had to market your business differently when you

Vicki Weinberg:

were getting people to a website?

Vicki Weinberg:

If that makes sense.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah.

Elizabeth Rees:

There's that balance, isn't it?

Elizabeth Rees:

Because I suppose they might find you through Etsy, but at the same

Elizabeth Rees:

time they can also lose you and get distracted by the products.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, so it, yeah, it's a hard, it's a hard balance to, to get, but, um, I

Elizabeth Rees:

decided, I think I decided to, to move to a website and I suppose to put all

Elizabeth Rees:

my eggs in one basket thinking I can build a blog up, I can, uh, um, take

Elizabeth Rees:

people's email addresses and, and that at the time was more important to me.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, Then people finding me through yet another marketplace.

Vicki Weinberg:

That makes a lot, that makes a lot of sense.

Vicki Weinberg:

I didn't actually think about it from that aspect, but yes, it's, it's easier

Vicki Weinberg:

for people to find you, but it is also easy to lose them because you're, I

Vicki Weinberg:

mean, I've done it when you're looking at something on Etsy and then you

Vicki Weinberg:

scroll down and then it's got like, if you like this, you might also like.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

And you can end up clicking happily clicking further and further away

Vicki Weinberg:

from the thing you were looking at.

Vicki Weinberg:

That does make sense.

Elizabeth Rees:

I think the other thing with Etsy as well is that it's

Elizabeth Rees:

hard because I was promoting my bags at a fair, a fairly high end price.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, I found it was difficult for people to, to understand the story through, um, Etsy.

Elizabeth Rees:

Then if I had a website, I could tell more of my story and, and I

Elizabeth Rees:

think with something like Etsy, you get a lot of hobbyists on Etsy.

Elizabeth Rees:

And not that I didn't wat to be associated, because I think a hobbyists

Elizabeth Rees:

get a bit of a, a bad stick sometimes, because the quality can still be there.

Elizabeth Rees:

But sometimes the problem is, is that they sell their products at a much lower end

Elizabeth Rees:

because they're not in it for a business.

Elizabeth Rees:

They just want to keep it as a hobby and the money that they are

Elizabeth Rees:

making just pay for their hobby.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, so that was the other reason I think I wanted to have my own

Elizabeth Rees:

website as well, is because of the cost of the product that I created.

Elizabeth Rees:

I wanted it to stand alone and people understand why it was costing that

Elizabeth Rees:

much rather than being compared to, um, too many other lower price product.

Vicki Weinberg:

That does make sense as well because you're right, when on

Vicki Weinberg:

any other marketplace you're comparing, maybe not like for like exactly, but

Vicki Weinberg:

you're comparing obviously different products, whereas on your website.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, and did you have to change how you, anything you did in terms of

Vicki Weinberg:

getting people over to your website?

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, beause it sounds like you, it's mostly, is it mostly social

Vicki Weinberg:

media you've been using to do that?

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah, I mean, I think for a long time when I, so when I

Elizabeth Rees:

first came onto Instagram, it was a very different place than it is now.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I know we go on about the algorithm, but it is true.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's, it was a lot easier.

Elizabeth Rees:

You could, you could get your, your posts in front of a lot more people.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and so yeah, so social media has been my, one of my main ways of, of

Elizabeth Rees:

getting new people to see my products.

Elizabeth Rees:

But then at the same time, I think a lot of it is word of mouth, and

Elizabeth Rees:

particularly because of the bags, um, people will go and talk to their

Elizabeth Rees:

friends or they'll give them as gifts.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and their marketplaces I think are quite important as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

I think being able to go to a real market and, and chat to people, um, and, and use

Elizabeth Rees:

that as a way of, of telling your story.

Elizabeth Rees:

I can take email or I can get emails down and get people onto

Elizabeth Rees:

my email, email list there.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, um, networking events are really good for, for speaking to other people.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I mean, I'm based in Cardiff and there's, there's a, there's so

Elizabeth Rees:

many small businesses in Cardiff and we all talk to each other and I've

Elizabeth Rees:

built up that network over time.

Elizabeth Rees:

And you get to know people and, and you might see them on social media and, and,

Elizabeth Rees:

and know, just contact them, meet up, um, and just start those conversations about

Elizabeth Rees:

what they do and, and help each other out.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I think that's another thing I've learned over, over the years is that,

Elizabeth Rees:

is, is, is just chatting to other people about their businesses and

Elizabeth Rees:

what they do and, um, and not going to get anything out yourself, but just

Elizabeth Rees:

because, I mean, I, I just love it.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, I, I love talking business to people and finding out about how

Elizabeth Rees:

they sell their products or service, um, and supporting them as much as

Elizabeth Rees:

I can, and they do the same for me.

Elizabeth Rees:

So it's just a really great way to, to support that, to build that network up of,

Elizabeth Rees:

of, um, especially women I think as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

I think, I think we, we really build our, our businesses in the strength of

Elizabeth Rees:

businesses up on emotional connections.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, which you can't just do sometimes over social media.

Elizabeth Rees:

I think it has to be done, um, in real life.

Elizabeth Rees:

It has to be done and the, the only way you can do that is through meeting

Elizabeth Rees:

up in real life and having that coffee and chatting and, um, yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

Absolutely.

Vicki Weinberg:

We were talking a little bit about me before we started recording about how

Vicki Weinberg:

much you can learn from each other, which is, you know, the main reason I, I, I

Vicki Weinberg:

mean, main reason I love this podcast is because it is genuinely interesting

Vicki Weinberg:

to talk about people's businesses and why people have done what they do, and

Vicki Weinberg:

the fact there's, it's just fascinating.

Vicki Weinberg:

And I think, like you said, there's a lot you can learn just

Vicki Weinberg:

by listening to other people.

Elizabeth Rees:

You really can, and.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, I mean, I, I, I've got a, I've got a friend that I, um, she's my, well, she

Elizabeth Rees:

started off as my accountability partner.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, she, she runs a business, producing um, digital, um, patterns.

Elizabeth Rees:

She's a fashion designer and we, we started meeting them every, every week

Elizabeth Rees:

and bouncing ideas off each other.

Elizabeth Rees:

And it's, it's the most useful thing because they can, I mean, apart from

Elizabeth Rees:

the fact they can hold you accountable, it's just somebody to talk to because

Elizabeth Rees:

it, it, it can be really lonely working on your own in your business.

Elizabeth Rees:

And sometimes that's all you need is just to say things out loud and

Elizabeth Rees:

somebody to turn around, especially if it's somebody that's, you can really

Elizabeth Rees:

trust and will be honest with you.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, you can say something and that person can either turn around and

Elizabeth Rees:

say, no, that's not going to work.

Elizabeth Rees:

Or they can, they can look at it from a different angle and make

Elizabeth Rees:

suggestions on how you can make something work slightly differently.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, I know you ha you don't have to listen to them all the time.

Elizabeth Rees:

And, and I know my, my accountability, Alex, accountability partner,

Elizabeth Rees:

Alex, there's been times where I've, she's made suggestions, and

Elizabeth Rees:

I've gone completely against it.

Elizabeth Rees:

But then there's been other times she's, she's turned around and said,

Elizabeth Rees:

look, you really need to change this because it all makes something,

Elizabeth Rees:

it will help you in the long run.

Elizabeth Rees:

And, um, and I've listened to her and I, it's the best thing I've done.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and, and it's worked the other way around as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

So I think, um, accountability partner is, uh, one of my biggest um, suggestions.

Elizabeth Rees:

I, I talk to a lot of people too, because I think it's a really useful,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, and free, um, oh, what's the word I, I've lost, um, I've forgot the word

Elizabeth Rees:

now, but it's, it's, it's a really free tool that you can, you can get, if

Elizabeth Rees:

you can get that right person as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

Makes such a difference.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much.

Vicki Weinberg:

I completely agree.

Vicki Weinberg:

Having someone you trust that you can just, even from, it's just to, to vent

Vicki Weinberg:

to, or whatever it is, but just someone who's going to listen and mm-hmm.

Vicki Weinberg:

, understand and give advice when you need.

Vicki Weinberg:

Yeah.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think that's invaluable.

Vicki Weinberg:

Mm-hmm.

Vicki Weinberg:

And I was about to ask you, Elizabeth, what your number one piece of advice

Vicki Weinberg:

would be for other product creators, would accountability partners be it, or

Vicki Weinberg:

do you have anything else you wanted?

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, it would, but I've also got another one and it's something,

Elizabeth Rees:

um, I've done the last few years.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and it would be to have a, a word of your year.

Elizabeth Rees:

A word of the year.

Elizabeth Rees:

Because the last few years I've had a word of the year, um,

Elizabeth Rees:

this one, this year's focus.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and I get it printed out and I put it on my wall.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, last year's I think was it consistency and the year before was fearless.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, and, and we do, I mean, at the beginning of the year, I, I do goals

Elizabeth Rees:

and, um, throughout the year come back to those goals and work on them.

Elizabeth Rees:

But yeah, just having a word of the year really helps.

Elizabeth Rees:

Given that, that focus, that's something I can keep myself accountable to.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I, I mean, the fearless year was, was a really important year for me because I,

Elizabeth Rees:

I put myself out there and did a, a talk and it was about my, it was about post

Elizabeth Rees:

depression and I did it in as part of this networking event that I'd been going to

Elizabeth Rees:

the for, women, um, mostly business women.

Elizabeth Rees:

And I don't think I would've done it if I hadn't had this word.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but it, it, it really put, helped me to push myself out of

Elizabeth Rees:

my comfort zone this, that year.

Elizabeth Rees:

And likewise, even this year focus, because I see that word every

Elizabeth Rees:

day, it really in, encourages and, and reminds me to be focused.

Elizabeth Rees:

So, yeah.

Elizabeth Rees:

A word of the year, I think.

Elizabeth Rees:

Is it ? It's.

Vicki Weinberg:

No, I really love that.

Vicki Weinberg:

I, um, no one's ever said that before, which I absolutely love.

Vicki Weinberg:

I love it when people have advice them.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, I don't know if you've ever listened to the podcast, Happy with Gretchen

Vicki Weinberg:

Ruben, because they recommend on that podcast having a word of the Year.

Vicki Weinberg:

That's quite a big theme that runs with podcast.

Vicki Weinberg:

And, um, yeah, I really like that.

Vicki Weinberg:

I, I, I have done it previously.

Vicki Weinberg:

This year I don't have a word of the year.

Vicki Weinberg:

Mm-hmm.

Vicki Weinberg:

Um, because I couldn't find one that resonated.

Vicki Weinberg:

Mm-hmm.

Vicki Weinberg:

And I feel like I didn't want to sort of have something that I wasn't feeling.

Vicki Weinberg:

But in previous years, I've definitely had.

Elizabeth Rees:

Yeah, no, it's.

Vicki Weinberg:

I had it last year cause it was all about trying to

Vicki Weinberg:

be a bit more relaxed and make things a bit easier on myself.

Elizabeth Rees:

I think it's, I mean, it's such a simple thing.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but like things like vision boards as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

I did a vision board this year and I have it next to my bed, so I see it.

Elizabeth Rees:

It's the first thing I see in the morning, last thing I see at night.

Elizabeth Rees:

And that's really useful because even just the idea of when you put it

Elizabeth Rees:

together, um, you can really get focused on what you, what you want and why.

Elizabeth Rees:

And the why?

Elizabeth Rees:

Because I think the reason why you're doing what you're doing is,

Elizabeth Rees:

is so important, um, and it doesn't, doesn't have to be just one thing.

Elizabeth Rees:

I mean, I've got things like family and um, and where I want, where I

Elizabeth Rees:

see my business, and then even things like self care and making, making

Elizabeth Rees:

sure I make time for that as well.

Elizabeth Rees:

And it, it is just reminding because I think it's so easy to get caught

Elizabeth Rees:

up in what we're trying to do and what we're trying to create business.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, but having, having a, a focus and, and visualizing, and I really

Elizabeth Rees:

love, um, um, Carrie from the Female Entrepreneur Association.

Elizabeth Rees:

She's brilliant at talking about visualization and, and, um, looking

Elizabeth Rees:

into why and, and the reasons for why we do what we are doing.

Elizabeth Rees:

Um, because there's, there's, there's more to life than just

Elizabeth Rees:

work and, um, I think we need to remind ourselves of that sometimes.

Vicki Weinberg:

I think you're right.

Vicki Weinberg:

Well, thank you so much.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you for everything you shared, Elizabeth, and I loved where you've ended.

Vicki Weinberg:

I just think that's really, yeah, like I said, that's advice I haven't had anyone

Vicki Weinberg:

before and I really like that because I think it's something really practical that

Vicki Weinberg:

people can go away and think about doing, that they might not have ever considered.

Elizabeth Rees:

Oh, thank you so much for having me on Vicki,

Elizabeth Rees:

it's been lovely chatting.

Vicki Weinberg:

You're so welcome.

Vicki Weinberg:

Thank you so much for listening right to the end of this episode.

Vicki Weinberg:

Do remember that you can get the full back catalogues and lots of free resources

Vicki Weinberg:

on my website, vickiweinberg.com.

Vicki Weinberg:

Please do remember to rate and review this episode if you've enjoyed it,

Vicki Weinberg:

and also share it with a friend who you think might find it useful.