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Exploring a Conversation about Health Equity with Pam Clark
Episode 1121st February 2024 • Common Conversations • "That Guy" Miguel Hampton
00:00:00 00:34:27

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Join us for an eye-opening conversation about the intersection of community and health equity with special guest, Pam Clark, the Minority Health Initiative Director at Community Action of Southern Indiana (CASI). We'll discuss how social factors and systemic issues can impact health outcomes and what we can do to promote health equity for all. Don't miss this insightful discussion!

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“This program is supported by the Clark County Indiana Health Department. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the funder”.


#healthyrelationships #healthequity #communityengagement

Transcripts

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Start It up

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Yo Welcome

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Yo, this is your boy, Guelly Guel.

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This is Common Convo

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And as you know, we've started this

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project with

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Clark County Health Department.

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As we're talking about health equity,

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we're talking about

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the challenges that we

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face right here in Clark County and

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surrounding areas

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with opioid addiction or

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just substance abuse as a whole, where

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we are in our mental health journeys,

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our wellness journeys.

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And so I'm excited to consistently be

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able to bring in different leaders,

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different health activists, if we will,

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into the studio and

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have an opportunity to talk about where

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we are in our community specifically.

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Things that we're doing right, things

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that we're doing wrong,

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things we can do different.

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And I think it's super important that

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we stay focused on

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the task of how do we

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heal, right?

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And for that, that's gonna mean

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different things for different people.

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And so today, I have the amazing, and

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Pam Clark with me, I say

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that super amazing,

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cuz I mean, she is phenomenal and does

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a lot in our community.

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I'm gonna let her explain a lot of it.

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And as we have this conversation about

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how you play a significant part

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of making sure that we do have equity

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in all communities across what,

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all racial boundaries, all ethnicities,

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LGBTQ plus, etc, etc.

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So Pam, we, and excuse the loud trucks

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and airplanes that are gonna go by,

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because we're in my studio and

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apparently there's

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construction down the street.

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And when you have that, it's there.

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So if I don't delete it, you

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heard it, it's not my fault.

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You didn't know who's watching, or if

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you're listening to the podcast.

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So but Pam, getting into here, will you

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tell our audience, who are you?

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And what do you do?

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Hey, Miguel, thank you

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so much for having me.

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As he said, I am Pamela Clark.

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I'm the Minority Health Initiative

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Director at Community

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Action of Southern Indiana.

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I am funded through the Indiana

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Minority Health

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Coalition out of Indianapolis.

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Who am I?

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I have been in public

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health for over 25 years, Miguel.

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Wow, you don't look older than I think

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you are in 25 years.

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I know it.

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[LAUGH] Thank you so much.

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But 25 years, my

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son, I think was three.

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And someone asked if I was interested

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in an HIV AIDS coordinator's position.

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Okay.

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At that time, I said, sure.

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I had no clue about public health.

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I wanted to go into business.

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So I did that job for two weeks.

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And then there was a

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position open up to pay more money.

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And the immunization

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coordinator paid good money, okay?

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All right, let's go.

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So I took that position to immunize

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every child by age two.

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After I took that position, I adored

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open an opportunity for me

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to have my own nonprofit.

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My own nonprofit, 501c3, was Southern

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Indiana Minority Health Coalition.

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Under Indiana

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Minority Health Coalition.

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I tell you, I had 13

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diseases to address.

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I wrote grants.

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I had that coalition for 14 years.

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I had plenty of volunteers, and it was

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located in Clark County.

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After that, I went to work, after I

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lost my mom to cancer.

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I went to work for the American Cancer

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Society for nine years.

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I covered the Mid-South Division down

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in the Black Belt,

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Alabama, Mississippi.

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And that program was a

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community-based program where we

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educated women on breast cancer.

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So, but Miguel, I have, this has been

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like a roller coaster ride for me.

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Because public health and losing so

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many family members to

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cancer, it became personal.

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My job became personal to where I've

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gotta make a

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difference in my community,

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where I live, where my children are

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growing up, where my family lives,

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where my friends live.

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I wanted to make a difference.

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You ever did something, I think you do.

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You ever did something where it's work,

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but you enjoy it so much.

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Absolutely, doing this right here.

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This is, I mean, it is.

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It's a tedious amount of work, and just

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on the technical side, being in it.

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But the other part is, is that this

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work for me is still

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about social justice.

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So much of what I cover, I had a

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conversation with

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Tia some years ago, and

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was like, man, if I could just get

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paid, figure out how to

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get paid, earn an income.

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Having conversations about how we fix

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the problems in our community,

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I'd be cool.

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And so yeah, absolutely.

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Good, so you know exactly what I mean.

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When I start talking about even

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relationships, when I start,

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because you can't do

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this job by yourself.

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When I had my nonprofit, I

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was the only one on staff.

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But the key was community partners.

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Clark Memorial Hospital,

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Clark County Health Department.

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Just churches and other nonprofits.

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Sitting at the table and representing

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the people you look like.

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I represent, whenever I sit at the

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table, I don't care where I am or

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whose table it is, I

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represent minority health.

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I represent people of color.

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I represent Clark County.

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And when I say that, that's also to

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identify resources

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that in our community,

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that our residents can use those

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resources to help them feel better.

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To help them get their screenings, to

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help them get their medication.

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But it's not always that easy, Miguel.

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We talk about that.

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We always had these

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conversations about access.

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We're saying, well, medical supplies is

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out there, hospitals are out there,

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doctors are out there,

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nurses are out there.

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Why is it that one community is saying,

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hey, I have access,

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or another part of the community

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saying, I don't have access?

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What makes it so complicated?

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The difference is that when we look at

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certain areas of Clark County,

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there are bus lines, there are

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daycares, there are jobs.

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But when we look at some of the other

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communities, there's not a bus line.

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There's folks who may not have

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completed a college education.

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Education becomes an

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issue, they may be low income.

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There are people, Miguel, I would go

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door to door in some of the communities

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in Clark County, and I would ask people

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about their health.

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I want to know how you're doing.

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I want to know if you know about the

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family health center that's over across

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the street.

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Have you used their services?

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So what I would do is I

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would ask those questions.

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If some women may need a mammogram, I

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had one woman that

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did need a mammogram,

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found a lump in her

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breast, but she was comfortable.

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She said, I'm okay, what I

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don't know won't hurt me.

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Well, see, as black folks, we do have a

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tendency to continue with those myths,

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to continue to say what I don't know

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won't hurt me, and that's not true.

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So I stood there and had a conversation

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with her, told her

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about the family health

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center, told her about the breast and

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cervical cancer program.

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How many people do you see?

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And I know I don't hate to say this,

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because you gotta go

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to where people are.

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And I know that may sound old cliche,

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but you have to go and

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you have to have that conversation.

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This lady did end up going to the

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family health center.

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She did end up receiving services.

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But if I had not knocked on her door,

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she may not have went.

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You're saying you have

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to go to where people are.

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And we talk about services, we talk

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about opportunities.

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So I think there's a couple things that

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come to mind for me.

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And one is sometimes we

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don't know the services existed.

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The other part is, is there something

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that happens in the black community or

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economically challenged communities

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where there's a trust issue?

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And so what I don't know

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won't hurt me is more so

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of a reflection of the

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trust in the community.

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I don't trust this facility.

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I may not trust this doctor, I may not

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trust this service.

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I wanna remain private and I don't

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trust that they won't share.

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Right, right.

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And part of that trust, when you start

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talking about trusting your doctors and

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trusting your provider, it goes back to

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the Tuskegee experiment.

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It goes back to history because we pass

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that information down

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through generations.

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And what we have to do is to make sure

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that we continue to

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educate individuals on speaking up for

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themselves when

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you're talking about trust.

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My own personal experience of trust

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with a doctor was when

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my son was an infant.

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And they assumed I was on Medicaid

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instead of having health insurance.

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They didn't ask for my health insurance

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card, they asked for my Medicaid card.

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And I've never been on Medicaid, but

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when I talk about trust,

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I'm referring to making sure that we

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have that open

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dialogue between our provider.

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And making sure that some people don't

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trust the prescriptions

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that their doctors give them.

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The conversations that I have are, if

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your doctor gives you a prescription,

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do you understand what a

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teaspoon, a tablespoon is?

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A lot of people don't understand that.

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It's really about health literacy and

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again being your own advocate when

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you're talking about

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trusting your own provider.

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Another example is I had a person in

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the community said that they did not go

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to this particular place for

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care because no one looked like them.

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And she was a woman, a black woman.

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And being a part of the community and

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having this particular

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organization on my board,

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I had a conversation with the executive

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director and she made changes.

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She made changes because you're not,

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again, you're working in the community.

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You're connecting them to resources,

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but you're also being that ear.

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You're also, as I said, when I sit down

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at the table, I represent

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the people that I serve.

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I represent the community.

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Let's address that sitting at the table

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because I know sitting at the many

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tables in this community,

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we might be the only ones.

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And what you just identified is why it

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is important for us

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sometimes to, for us as brown,

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black people to be in

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an awkward space, right?

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Being the only one at the table because

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when we do voice something, it may be

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the first time that anyone on that

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board or on that committee has ever

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heard of that issue.

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And if you don't advocate, if we can't

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give agency to the

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people who don't have agency,

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then the growth that we

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hope will come doesn't.

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And you deliver that.

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And so you can sit here and say, yes,

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things have changed.

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And I've worked with directors and

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programs who said, man, we don't have

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people of color who work here,

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so we'll adjust that.

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Now, not everybody does that.

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Some people don't care or

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they have rhyme and reason.

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We'll just leave it like that.

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As I said, I was going

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to play nice on this.

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Yes.

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You are being really good.

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You are because I know I

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know how this could go.

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But yeah, you are.

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That's OK.

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You know, sometimes there's a time to

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carry a spear and

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sometimes carry a pen in the book.

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And on this series, I think it's more

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about let's educate.

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It's a hard conversation

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no matter how we look at it.

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And because go ahead.

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Because you have to you have to have

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that conversation about systemic

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racism, discrimination.

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If I feel it, if someone in your office

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mistreated me and I just leave,

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you're not going to hear about what

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happened or why I left.

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You're not going to follow up with me.

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But if I see Pam on the street and Pam,

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this is what happened.

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I'm going to go back and we're going to

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have that conversation.

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It's a conversation

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that we have to have.

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When you're talking about

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discrimination, stress

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brings on a lot of issues.

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Stress brings on headaches,

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hypertension, heart disease.

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It plays a role in a

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lot of chronic diseases.

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So if I'm feeling-- and I know you

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understand this from 2020.

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Because I keep going back with--

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I know we're being recorded.

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But (Maurice) Miguel, I keep going back to the

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stress that I felt in 2020.

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The marches that-- the headaches that I

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had, the concerns I had.

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Now see, that brings

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social determinants of health.

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So when I don't feel safe or if I'm

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concerned about my teenage child,

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that's part of public health.

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Feeling safe is part of public health.

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So I have to make sure that I address

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those issues when it comes to safety,

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when it comes to

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discrimination, when it comes to--

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so when I'm being mistreated, when I

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don't feel like I'm getting the care

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that I need.

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And it's OK to speak up.

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Just like you guys marched.

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Y'all spoke up in 2020.

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Yeah.

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I mean, I think 2020, 19, it changed a

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lot for a lot of people.

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And I think for some of us--

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and I'll backtrack a little bit.

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I had a couple of clients that said you

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shouldn't be out there.

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And most people don't even

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know how I got to the fact

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that I was protesting anyway.

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And it was weird because my daughter

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wanted to go protest

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in the first night the things that were

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going on in Louisville

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in terms of Breonna Taylor.

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And so we're in night two, and I'm

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watching it in the office.

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And Teah and shug call.

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I want to go downtown, and I have a

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voice, and I want to

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voice it in my head.

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I said no.

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And I've been telling this story.

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And I was like, nah,

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I'm not taking you down.

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You have no idea what

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that is going to look like.

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And they said, well, who

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better to take me than you, Dad?

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You know what it's going to look like.

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You know what it's going to feel like.

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And I was like, you know what?

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You're right.

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What we don't later

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understand is the amount of trauma

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that we cause to ourselves being in a

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volatile environment.

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It was a war environment, right?

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Brought on by both

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government and people.

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And so we have to address that.

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But it gave such a new voice.

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I remember sitting on one

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SI's board for some years,

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and we would introduce this thing about

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social racism or social equity

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or economics and the fact that black

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folks were being excluded and yada,

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yada, yada, and so on.

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And we would continue to

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have these conversations.

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And they wouldn't really go anywhere.

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It's the math didn't math at the time.

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And I think what 2020 showed the US,

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but very specifically at home,

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was that we are not far removed from

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the racial inequities that

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happen across the country.

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And in Clark County, Floyd

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County, and across the river,

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in Jefferson County, Lou, there are a

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lot that are happening

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that's intentional.

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And it does create home, right?

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It is a continuation of the inequities

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that we face systematically.

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And no matter how many

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PAM's are in the place,

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no matter how many Miguel's are in a

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place, if the powers don't be,

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if our mayors and our governors, people

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who are ahead of our health

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departments, people who are ahead of

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organizations and banks

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are not paying attention or don't want

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a culture of equity,

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then we have to

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address these things, right?

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Because we were not--

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I would like to say we're not safe.

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For a lot of people, safety in this

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community, being Black or Brown,

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doesn't exist, right?

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We leave the home with a concern that

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we live in an unsafe environment,

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both from institution and individuals.

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And I think part of this

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conversation, I think the fact

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that Clark County Health Department

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said, let's have a conversation,

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let's have an open dialogue about what

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health equity looks like.

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I asked the conversation--

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during the 2020, we were all sitting in

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these Zoom meetings because of COVID.

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And I asked the question there, we

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weren't talking about health equity.

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We were talking about wealth and

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economic positioning of the community

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as a whole.

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And I remember asking a lot of the

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leadership in that room,

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what does equity look like?

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You're saying you want to create it,

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but what does it look like?

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And that conversation never happened.

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The answer never came.

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And we're in 2023.

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I want to say the

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answer still has yet been--

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I have yet to hear it, but what I have

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seen is a few people,

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a few organizations say, let's step out

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here and see if we can figure it out.

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Because we don't

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know what it looks like.

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And we don't have a plan.

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Now, there are some folks like Mayor

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Treva Hodges or Mayor Treva Hodges

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over in Charlestown (Indiana) has done some

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really unique things in terms

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of hiring practices and programming.

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And she's been boisterous about it.

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Yes, she has.

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You've got CASI, who is

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doing a great deal of things.

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And so we have pockets

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of folks in the community.

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The fact that Dr. Yezel

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with the Health Department

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is out here looking at it

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and saying, how do we fix it?

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How do we implement things?

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What's missing?

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Right.

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And we have to fix it together.

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Yeah.

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We can't-- we have to have--

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when I say together, not just

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with the health professionals and not

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just with those folks who

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are community health workers, we have

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to bring those folks

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to the table from the community.

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We have to have that discussion, that

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raw discussion from those

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that it really impacts.

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Because black men are still

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dying from chronic diseases,

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from hypertension, from strokes,

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from seven years

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earlier than white men.

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And till this day, this is 2022.

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And we are still at

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the top of the chart

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when it comes to health disparities.

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The gap has not been closed.

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I remember when I first started, we

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talked about healthy people--

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I think it was Healthy People 2018,

Speaker:

Healthy People 2016.

Speaker:

We're talking about

Speaker:

Healthy People Close to Health

Speaker:

Disparities Gap.

Speaker:

How are we going to do that?

Speaker:

We have to also-- we can't leave out

Speaker:

the part of advocacy.

Speaker:

We can't leave the part out

Speaker:

of going to the state house

Speaker:

and being that voice and being heard.

Speaker:

There was one time they wanted to--

Speaker:

you ever talk about cutting the Breast

Speaker:

and Cervical Cancer

Speaker:

Program dollars.

Speaker:

Who do you think

Speaker:

that's going to impact?

Speaker:

That's going to impact women of color.

Speaker:

And I don't know if you

Speaker:

want to delete this part,

Speaker:

but we're also talking about abortion.

Speaker:

At the state level,

Speaker:

we're talking about abortion.

Speaker:

We're talking about now--

Speaker:

we're talking about women of color

Speaker:

now going back to the alley to get this

Speaker:

botched up job done.

Speaker:

Because we are passing laws that are

Speaker:

going to be so strict

Speaker:

in the state of Indiana.

Speaker:

Even if a woman has been raped, she's

Speaker:

not going to be able

Speaker:

to get an abortion.

Speaker:

We've had this conversation

Speaker:

on a couple of the podcasts,

Speaker:

and what does the world

Speaker:

look like post-Rovy Way?

Speaker:

But here's the even

Speaker:

crazier question is,

Speaker:

what does our community

Speaker:

look like during Rovy Way?

Speaker:

Some communities were already bad,

Speaker:

Indiana being one of them.

Speaker:

I had Dr. Rita on

Speaker:

here in the last session,

Speaker:

and we talked about the

Speaker:

fact that one out of every four

Speaker:

young women will be

Speaker:

sexually assaulted and abused

Speaker:

before she leaves middle

Speaker:

school, and men one out of six

Speaker:

young boys.

Speaker:

And these are reported.

Speaker:

So we already live in an environment

Speaker:

that is dangerous in that relationship,

Speaker:

but here we are

Speaker:

passing laws that will--

Speaker:

a lot of times they

Speaker:

say we're passing laws

Speaker:

because we want to protect

Speaker:

an unborn child or a fetus,

Speaker:

and I respect that.

Speaker:

But at the same time, we're also

Speaker:

passing laws, I think,

Speaker:

who are protecting predators.

Speaker:

And I once asked a question

Speaker:

of some elected officials.

Speaker:

I said, when you pass

Speaker:

this law, who are you really

Speaker:

protecting your friends, who you know

Speaker:

are out here raping

Speaker:

and pillaging, or

Speaker:

the people that you're

Speaker:

supposed to legitimately protect?

Speaker:

And I think we have to

Speaker:

continue to have that conversation,

Speaker:

because there's--

Speaker:

I'm firm believer that we have to

Speaker:

protect women's rights.

Speaker:

There's no reason we

Speaker:

should be making laws that

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dictate what a woman

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should or can or can't

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do with their own body.

Speaker:

That is not freedom.

Speaker:

That's not independence.

Speaker:

And that goes against the American

Speaker:

concept, in my opinion.

Speaker:

Exactly, exactly.

Speaker:

And another, we don't know how we're

Speaker:

going to come out post-COVID with

Speaker:

mental health in our youth.

Speaker:

That's another topic.

Speaker:

Absolutely.

Speaker:

We've had an increase.

Speaker:

And to me, one suicide is too much.

Speaker:

That's too many.

Speaker:

So this past summer for our

Speaker:

annual Back to School event,

Speaker:

I had Center Stone set

Speaker:

up a table just for them

Speaker:

to talk to parents and

Speaker:

to follow up with parents.

Speaker:

Because I want to make sure that our

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kids are feeling safe,

Speaker:

able to have a conversation with

Speaker:

someone, some adults,

Speaker:

somewhere.

Speaker:

They've lost friends.

Speaker:

They've lost family to COVID.

Speaker:

So we don't know how this

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COVID is going to impact

Speaker:

is going to have on our

Speaker:

children, the isolation.

Speaker:

I think still with going to school

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and sitting in a

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classroom for some is a challenge.

Speaker:

Is it safe to say that

Speaker:

COVID, the last couple of years,

Speaker:

there's no going back to a norm.

Speaker:

This is our new norm.

Speaker:

Exactly.

Speaker:

And we have to figure out how

Speaker:

to thrive and be safe in it.

Speaker:

I wonder, even in

Speaker:

that, I wonder how many,

Speaker:

when we look at the

Speaker:

diversity of our community,

Speaker:

how many therapists, how many

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psychologists do we have?

Speaker:

Are there black, brown, or women who

Speaker:

are of other ethnicities?

Speaker:

Because we're not just a

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black, white community.

Speaker:

We have Africans.

Speaker:

We have Hispanics from

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all different regions.

Speaker:

So we really have a plethora of folks.

Speaker:

And are we really addressing the needs

Speaker:

of the people in the cultures?

Speaker:

Is there anything you want to share?

Speaker:

As we have these conversations.

Speaker:

I would like for

Speaker:

people to just get involved.

Speaker:

Something that I'm working on,

Speaker:

and I don't know when I'm going to be

Speaker:

able to implement this,

Speaker:

but it's been near

Speaker:

and dear to my heart,

Speaker:

which is crime in the

Speaker:

African-American community.

Speaker:

Something that I would

Speaker:

like to do is to start out

Speaker:

with a panel of discussion,

Speaker:

but I like doing things out the box.

Speaker:

I don't like doing the normal things.

Speaker:

I want to have someone

Speaker:

there from the trauma center,

Speaker:

from the funeral home.

Speaker:

I want to have a parent there.

Speaker:

I want to have, I want

Speaker:

to have a real discussion,

Speaker:

but I don't want it to end just there.

Speaker:

A lot of times we

Speaker:

have town hall meetings

Speaker:

and we voice our concerns.

Speaker:

We get up, we testify, we tell all

Speaker:

these great stories.

Speaker:

And then it just sits there.

Speaker:

And what happens after that?

Speaker:

Again, I'm only one person,

Speaker:

but if I can get the

Speaker:

community involved,

Speaker:

the community to share.

Speaker:

And when I say that community,

Speaker:

I'm talking about folks

Speaker:

that live in public housing,

Speaker:

folks that live in a

Speaker:

million dollar homes.

Speaker:

I want to get all these

Speaker:

people together in one room

Speaker:

so we can talk about it.

Speaker:

And then we come up with a plan.

Speaker:

Bring our mayors,

Speaker:

our local politicians,

Speaker:

bring all of those folks in

Speaker:

to have that conversation.

Speaker:

Is it going to happen overnight?

Speaker:

No, it's not going to happen overnight.

Speaker:

But Clark County always

Speaker:

say we're not in Oz anymore.

Speaker:

- No, no.

Speaker:

- It's not where I grew up.

Speaker:

I've been here all my life.

Speaker:

And it is not, when

Speaker:

I'm going to tell you,

Speaker:

I was in the hospital, I

Speaker:

was diagnosed with epilepsy

Speaker:

when I was three.

Speaker:

I was in the hospital.

Speaker:

I was in the basement.

Speaker:

- Basement?

Speaker:

- Yeah, I was in the basement

Speaker:

because black kids could not go.

Speaker:

Black people couldn't go.

Speaker:

If you went to the

Speaker:

hospital and you were admitted,

Speaker:

you were admitted in the basement.

Speaker:

- That's unheard of.

Speaker:

- No.

Speaker:

- I mean, it's not unheard of clearly.

Speaker:

That's crazy.

Speaker:

- No, I remember that.

Speaker:

- Wow.

Speaker:

- Yes, yes.

Speaker:

My mother never had any complaints

Speaker:

in terms of how I was treated.

Speaker:

She didn't have any

Speaker:

complaints about that.

Speaker:

But things have changed,

Speaker:

but then again, things haven't changed.

Speaker:

Things have been covered up.

Speaker:

- Okay.

Speaker:

- So we have to talk about that.

Speaker:

And you talk about Dr. Yazone,

Speaker:

you talk about Rita Fleming,

Speaker:

and you talk about Treva Hodges,

Speaker:

and those are just to name a few,

Speaker:

that are, I call,

Speaker:

they're on the front line

Speaker:

for all people, for people of color.

Speaker:

They're easy to approach.

Speaker:

They're approachable to discuss issues

Speaker:

that even one

Speaker:

individual has a concern about.

Speaker:

How can we get together

Speaker:

and have those conversations?

Speaker:

And sometimes we think,

Speaker:

oh, I'm just one person.

Speaker:

That's okay.

Speaker:

- You can be one person.

Speaker:

- One person can do a lot.

Speaker:

- That's right.

Speaker:

- It's the spark that moves things.

Speaker:

And I love the fact you said,

Speaker:

hey, let's move beyond conversation.

Speaker:

We have to have action plans in place.

Speaker:

And so if we're gonna

Speaker:

address equity at any level,

Speaker:

if we're gonna address the crime levels

Speaker:

that are increasing in key communities,

Speaker:

then how do we address that?

Speaker:

And it's not just about policing.

Speaker:

It is about those who are in the

Speaker:

community owning it.

Speaker:

Having some degree of ownership,

Speaker:

whether you have a

Speaker:

mortgage or you're renting it.

Speaker:

There's different levels of ownership.

Speaker:

And I think the other piece is,

Speaker:

is that we have to look at opportunity.

Speaker:

Why does crime happen?

Speaker:

What are the reasons?

Speaker:

What are the things

Speaker:

causing for things to occur?

Speaker:

And how do we begin to address that

Speaker:

versus just saying,

Speaker:

hey, this is

Speaker:

something we need to police

Speaker:

and somebody needs to go to jail.

Speaker:

I think that has to be a thing too,

Speaker:

because when we live in a community

Speaker:

that is focused on economic growth,

Speaker:

economic means, financial value,

Speaker:

and we have

Speaker:

communities that are ignored.

Speaker:

And we have communities that are

Speaker:

intentionally ignored.

Speaker:

And we have to address that as well.

Speaker:

- Because that's their problem.

Speaker:

- Yes.

Speaker:

- That's not really our problem.

Speaker:

- Yes, when tax

Speaker:

dollars came from everybody.

Speaker:

- That's right, that's right.

Speaker:

And something else I

Speaker:

wanna bring up real quick

Speaker:

is that I served on a policy

Speaker:

that the state of Indiana is working on

Speaker:

called direct service workers.

Speaker:

And direct service

Speaker:

workers, as you know,

Speaker:

are usually, they're like our CNAs

Speaker:

and folks that are

Speaker:

caregivers, even, you know,

Speaker:

I was a caregiver to my mom and

Speaker:

caregiver to my husband.

Speaker:

And caregivers, I'm

Speaker:

paid a lot of money.

Speaker:

If we could get,

Speaker:

if what they're talking about doing

Speaker:

is identifying a

Speaker:

career track, a career path,

Speaker:

but also making sure that

Speaker:

they have the resources.

Speaker:

If a CNA wants to become a nurse,

Speaker:

to make sure that she has those

Speaker:

resources to become a nurse.

Speaker:

Because if we can pull

Speaker:

them up to another level,

Speaker:

because we have more people aging,

Speaker:

we have an aging population as well.

Speaker:

- Yes.

Speaker:

- Okay, now we don't like to put our

Speaker:

folks in nursing homes.

Speaker:

They're trying to keep

Speaker:

folks out of nursing homes.

Speaker:

So if we can get our family members,

Speaker:

if we can take care for our loved ones,

Speaker:

if we can also get our

Speaker:

direct service workers,

Speaker:

if we can get behind them

Speaker:

and the state can pass those policies

Speaker:

to help our direct service workers

Speaker:

to become more self-sufficient,

Speaker:

that would also help

Speaker:

our economy as well.

Speaker:

- We've got a nice, we've

Speaker:

got a lot to think about.

Speaker:

- We've got a lot to think about.

Speaker:

- We've got a lot to work on.

Speaker:

- But that's my day.

Speaker:

- Yes, wow.

Speaker:

- If you ask me, Pam,

Speaker:

what are you doing today?

Speaker:

- That's a long list of things.

Speaker:

- I'm also working on infant mortality.

Speaker:

I was telling you about the local food

Speaker:

purchase the excess

Speaker:

grant that Community Action

Speaker:

just received and

Speaker:

working with BIPOC farmers

Speaker:

and working with black farmers

Speaker:

and working those 20 counties

Speaker:

and getting fresh fruits and

Speaker:

vegetables to those counties,

Speaker:

to those folks that

Speaker:

live in those 20 counties

Speaker:

and that there's only five grants in

Speaker:

the state of Indiana

Speaker:

that Community Action

Speaker:

is the lead agency on.

Speaker:

So if you ask me about that,

Speaker:

I'm also over here working with doulas.

Speaker:

I'm writing a grant to try to get,

Speaker:

I have a couple of doulas

Speaker:

that are gonna be working

Speaker:

with our Head Start families.

Speaker:

I have doulas that's gonna be working

Speaker:

and talking about breastfeeding

Speaker:

and talking about

Speaker:

nutrition and physical activity

Speaker:

and really focusing on

Speaker:

that, the low income families

Speaker:

and making sure that those

Speaker:

women have what they need

Speaker:

and connect them to resources as well.

Speaker:

- How do we get all of

Speaker:

that out there into the ether?

Speaker:

- Ooh.

Speaker:

- Like, I mean, I'm in certain spaces

Speaker:

and I don't always get to hear about

Speaker:

the different programs.

Speaker:

When I do pick up a newspaper,

Speaker:

I don't always hear about

Speaker:

the different new programs

Speaker:

and in Clark and Floyd County, we

Speaker:

really don't have news.

Speaker:

- We don't have news.

Speaker:

- So how do we get that

Speaker:

information out to the people

Speaker:

on an ongoing basis?

Speaker:

- We had over a thousand people,

Speaker:

individuals that attended

Speaker:

the Back to School event,

Speaker:

a thousand, every year

Speaker:

there's more and more.

Speaker:

We went to the media,

Speaker:

our community partners,

Speaker:

we were on TV, radio,

Speaker:

just trying to get that

Speaker:

information out there.

Speaker:

That's because people are

Speaker:

having a difficult time,

Speaker:

hard time with getting

Speaker:

jobs or even retaining the job

Speaker:

because so many people have been home.

Speaker:

It's hard to sit at a desk when you've

Speaker:

been home for a long time.

Speaker:

- That hustle is different now.

Speaker:

- It is, it's a little different, it's

Speaker:

a little different.

Speaker:

So what we do is we use

Speaker:

our community partners,

Speaker:

we use our churches to

Speaker:

try to get the word out.

Speaker:

I just started diabetes class last

Speaker:

week, every Wednesday.

Speaker:

A lot of us, we

Speaker:

still call it the sugar.

Speaker:

- Yeah.

Speaker:

- I don't want to have a late,

Speaker:

she told me she was

Speaker:

diagnosed with diabetes,

Speaker:

but she said, "You know

Speaker:

what I call it, sugar?

Speaker:

I can't say the word diabetes."

Speaker:

- Don't wanna own that disease.

Speaker:

- Don't wanna own it.

Speaker:

- Well, I'm in this already.

Speaker:

- And we're still, we've got people

Speaker:

still, that's okay.

Speaker:

- We don't have to quiet enough.

Speaker:

- Because we can address that.

Speaker:

But how do you, so are you teaching,

Speaker:

and I know we gotta wrap up,

Speaker:

so in that diabetes

Speaker:

class and that sugar class.

Speaker:

- In that sugar class, probably.

Speaker:

- Are we teaching new ways of eating?

Speaker:

- Yes, we are.

Speaker:

And it's not, when I

Speaker:

say I'm having a class

Speaker:

and it's facilitated by

Speaker:

an RN, registered nurse,

Speaker:

when I say I'm having a class,

Speaker:

it's not where she's coming in and

Speaker:

she's lecturing you.

Speaker:

This is interactive.

Speaker:

We're actually doing food demonstration

Speaker:

and we bring in partners to do this.

Speaker:

- Can I come film that one?

Speaker:

- You can come and you

Speaker:

get a little blender.

Speaker:

I mean, you're getting

Speaker:

some things to take home.

Speaker:

Every class that you attend,

Speaker:

you will get something to take home.

Speaker:

We have activities that you do.

Speaker:

We play bingo, you get a game,

Speaker:

but yet, and still, it's educational.

Speaker:

If you have free

Speaker:

diabetes, if you have diabetes,

Speaker:

or if you're a caregiver

Speaker:

to someone with diabetes,

Speaker:

please come out to our

Speaker:

class at Community Action.

Speaker:

We start at that class

Speaker:

every Wednesday at 4.30.

Speaker:

- So how do I get it out?

Speaker:

I don't know.

Speaker:

I think people just call me and say,

Speaker:

"Pam, what are you doing?"

Speaker:

Sometimes I don't know where to start.

Speaker:

- What if they don't know a Pam?

Speaker:

How do they find you?

Speaker:

- They can call Community

Speaker:

Action, just ask for Pam.

Speaker:

- Just ask for Pam.

Speaker:

- And they'll say, "Pam,

Speaker:

the minority health girl,"

Speaker:

and they'll put you through.

Speaker:

- And we need your help.

Speaker:

- We need your help, yes.

Speaker:

- From service to farm.

Speaker:

So when does the

Speaker:

farming program launch?

Speaker:

- That we started, we received our,

Speaker:

I'm gonna say in four months.

Speaker:

- In four months?

Speaker:

- Mm-hmm.

Speaker:

- You're gonna look for that as well.

Speaker:

You're gonna look

Speaker:

for some fresh produce

Speaker:

here in Clark County.

Speaker:

- Well, thank you for joining me.

Speaker:

- Thank you for having me.

Speaker:

- It's been most informative.

Speaker:

I hope that if you're

Speaker:

listening or you get to watch,

Speaker:

you picked up some information.

Speaker:

This is specific to

Speaker:

Clark County, Indiana.

Speaker:

But if you are watching somewhere else

Speaker:

or listening somewhere else,

Speaker:

ask yourself, what are you doing in

Speaker:

your own community?

Speaker:

What information do you have?

Speaker:

What information don't you have?

Speaker:

Are you not getting it

Speaker:

because you're not at the table?

Speaker:

And sometimes we have to

Speaker:

move out of our comfort zones

Speaker:

and show up in spaces so that we can

Speaker:

get the information

Speaker:

and then bring it

Speaker:

back to our community.

Speaker:

I'm with Pam Clark, we're at CASI

Speaker:

This is your boy, Guelly Guel

Speaker:

This is "Common Conversations"

Speaker:

with the Health Equity Story.

Speaker:

Thank you very much, and

Speaker:

we'll see you next show.

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