Artwork for podcast Buckets & Boom Gates
Team Series - Why Is Delegating So Hard To Learn The Right Way
Episode 7119th June 2024 • Buckets & Boom Gates • Kim White - My Sexy Business Team & Community
00:00:00 00:28:06

Share Episode

Shownotes

Welcome to the Buckets and Boom Gates Studio with Kim White and Jill Olish. This week's conversation in the Team Series is focused on the right, or wrong, ways to delegate. Kim shares some confessions on the wrong ways to delegate. And together Jill and Kim discuss gaining more time back for you as the owner versus spending all your time doing all the little things in your business. Keep listening to hear their own trials learning how to get support from others.

  • One of the worst ways to delegate
  • Assuming someone else knows what you know
  • Your business owns you because you can't delegate
  • Asking questions means my instructions aren't clear
  • An assistant of any kind is for the purpose of delegating to them something that takes something off you as the owner's plate
  • Delegating because we don't like something is a great place to start
  • The hardest place to start when you start delegating
  • Trying to cut the cost in the wrong place
  • A team supports my calendar so that the business can run without me

So delegation to, Kim and Jill, is the key to setting things in motion. It's just knowing how to delegate and when to delegate because, without it, it's not possible to have a business that doesn't own you.

Join us next week for another episode in the Team Series.

So you can come and check out a community that is learning together, and implementing the things we talk about on this podcast at the Groundwork Brigade Mastermind Open House. Let us know that you heard about it on the BBG Podcast and get a free month.

Transcripts

:

Welcome back to the BBG studio.

2

:

I am here with the beautiful Jill Olish.

3

:

We are here today to talk

about buckets and boom gates.

4

:

And this week Jill O is the team

series still we're carrying on.

5

:

Speaker 4: Yes.

6

:

And Kim, thank you for

having me be a part of this.

7

:

You are the fiercest.

8

:

And wonderful team leader of my

sexy business team and community.

9

:

Um, and an expert in my opinion,

experienced leader in delegating.

10

:

I'll take the

11

:

Speaker 3: experienced

12

:

Speaker 4: leader.

13

:

I

14

:

Speaker 3: will not take

15

:

Speaker 4: the

16

:

Speaker 3: expert.

17

:

I'm the

18

:

Speaker 4: expert

19

:

Speaker 3: of nothing.

20

:

Speaker 4: You are an experienced

leader in delegating and

21

:

we have lots to talk about.

22

:

And I think you need

to start us off at all.

23

:

A little bit why we're talking

about delegating again.

24

:

Speaker 3: So the last couple of

episodes we've been leading up to a

25

:

lot of the team series things, and

we've talked about how to join a team.

26

:

We've talked about being on a team.

27

:

We've talked about to delegate.

28

:

I really think we need to slow our

role a little bit and talk about how

29

:

to delegate because so much can be

riding on whether a business owner.

30

:

Whether an entrepreneur can delegate.

31

:

And I have some confessions to make today

about how terrible of a delegator I used

32

:

to be still learning, by the way, still

absolutely learning how to delegate.

33

:

I think this is a really

important conversation, Jill.

34

:

Speaker 4: It's.

35

:

Super important for the entrepreneurs

out there, especially those beginning

36

:

who may not even have heard of

the word delegate in business.

37

:

Cause I know it was a new

concept for me starting out.

38

:

Um, and there's a right

and a wrong way to do it.

39

:

And it can have a lot of

40

:

repercussions or a lot of success.

41

:

Depending on if you're well versed at it.

42

:

So I'm glad we're able to talk about

it and I can learn more as we keep

43

:

practicing on the team and in life.

44

:

So I'm ready to get spicy today.

45

:

Speaker 3: Oh, it will be spicy, Jill.

46

:

It will be spicy.

47

:

One thing I want to say right out of

the gate, delegation is never easy.

48

:

Everybody wants the easy button

for delegation and there's not one.

49

:

So delegating can make or break your

business actually, and if you're new to

50

:

it, I want you to hear me loud and clear

that it can cause you the most damage and

51

:

the most pain to delegate something if

you are trying to do it the wrong way.

52

:

And I do feel like I did it the wrong way.

53

:

So I can absolutely speak to this.

54

:

I've done it the wrong way over

and over, like different ways.

55

:

And that's one of the reasons we're

here in this podcast in particular is

56

:

we want to make things with a shorter

learning curve for you and we want

57

:

to make a, you know, we just want to

share that you're not by yourself if

58

:

you've been messy about your delegation.

59

:

Let me, let me just say that.

60

:

Speaker 4: No.

61

:

Definitely not alone in that.

62

:

Um, so Kim, with starting off

with the question of how do I,

63

:

how, what is not the right way to

delegate to where we want to start?

64

:

Speaker 3: I think that that

would be a great place to start.

65

:

And I'm kind of giggling because when you

delegate the wrong way, it becomes more

66

:

painful than it was before you delegated.

67

:

So a lot of business owners will go in

thinking that they can be replaced, like,

68

:

what they're thinking in their mind,

what they've been doing to build their

69

:

business can be replaced instantly with

someone who they, they, they may know the

70

:

person, but they, that person doesn't know

what they've been thinking in their head.

71

:

So I'll, I'll give the example of one

of the worst ways to delegate is to

72

:

assume someone else knows what you know.

73

:

It doesn't mean they don't know that.

74

:

However, you do things a certain way.

75

:

You have a certain way of doing

things, you have a certain

76

:

process you use, whatever it is.

77

:

Even if it's a bad process, you have a

way of doing something for your business.

78

:

The reason to delegate is to gain

more time back for you as the owner

79

:

versus spending all your time doing

all the little things in your business.

80

:

So that's the first place to delegate.

81

:

But you can't think that someone's

going to instantly be able to read your

82

:

mind, do what you're doing now, and

just take off and bazillion dollars.

83

:

Because I think that's the common thing

through so many entrepreneurs that I see.

84

:

Speaker 4: Is there a moment that

comes up as we're talking about

85

:

this, that you remember being a

wrong way of delegating to someone?

86

:

Speaker 3: I have a whole list.

87

:

I'll just say that.

88

:

I have a whole list.

89

:

In the beginning, I feel

like I am probably the poster

90

:

child for how to do it wrong.

91

:

So in the beginning, I thought if I knew

something, everybody else already knew it

92

:

because I feel like I'm a slow learner.

93

:

So if I'm going to delegate something,

I can go through a list of humans,

94

:

like on a service, and I started

with a service that is common.

95

:

You know, with business owners and with

entrepreneurs who are not able to bring

96

:

someone on full time, let's just say

that they're starting out with a task.

97

:

So maybe they hire a virtual assistant

from one of the platforms that offers that

98

:

per hour you pay goes into like an escrow

account, and then someone does the work

99

:

and then you approve it and they're paid.

100

:

So, that's a process of something online.

101

:

And I believe that one of

the biggest ones is Upwork.

102

:

We are not recommending, we are not

saying don't use them or use them.

103

:

We're not saying either

one of those things.

104

:

But there was a similar one

that I used in the beginning.

105

:

And when I did, I wanted someone

who could do certain, like, VA

106

:

tasks, virtual assistant tasks.

107

:

I wanted them to do certain things.

108

:

So, I gave the list of

what I wanted them to do.

109

:

Sounded easy, sounded like they

were going to solve the pain.

110

:

The problem was I didn't realize I didn't

have anything set up for them to follow.

111

:

So, when I told them to check my

email, and this is a true story, when

112

:

it was a checking my email thing,

Well, they can read all my emails.

113

:

What, what are they

supposed to do with them?

114

:

What are they supposed

to tell me is in there?

115

:

What are they, like what is

their job to do to make sure

116

:

I know what's in my emails?

117

:

Because the reason I wanted them to

check my emails was to give me back time.

118

:

I was getting hundreds of emails

at the time, which now we get

119

:

thousands, which is like literal.

120

:

We get thousands of emails.

121

:

Every week that we have to sort

through well back then I was getting

122

:

hundreds and I'll be honest dozens

to me is overwhelming because email,

123

:

email is hard, but that was one

of the things I saw I could do.

124

:

I could delegate this, but because

I didn't have any kind of process in

125

:

place, they were reading my emails

and I was still reading my emails.

126

:

And then I was still deciding what needed

to be done and what, and if I asked them

127

:

to, you know, send a message to someone,

they didn't know that someone, so I

128

:

did have someone who was very literal,

very factual in what they were doing.

129

:

So if I said, hey, can you see if

I can move this or reschedule this?

130

:

That was no problem.

131

:

They did that, but they did it in

such a way that actually was hurting

132

:

clients feelings and, and causing

harm in relationships because, Hey, I

133

:

need to move this not, not optional.

134

:

You know, Kim needs to just cut and dry.

135

:

And it's like, Ooh, you, you need

to, you need to at least say hello

136

:

to them, or at least say, I'm, I'm

Kim's assistant, you need to say,

137

:

you need to frame this in a way.

138

:

Because I wasn't saying we are moving

this time and that's what they were doing.

139

:

We are moving this time

and no, it was a question.

140

:

It's a question.

141

:

So that was a hard experience of,

okay, maybe I need to rethink this.

142

:

I don't know how to delegate.

143

:

I don't know how to hire

a virtual assistant.

144

:

However, that was not my first thought.

145

:

My first thought was they

don't know what they're doing.

146

:

My first thought was.

147

:

They're not, they're not a good

VA because they're not doing,

148

:

they're not managing my emails.

149

:

They're not managing my

calendar because they are like

150

:

putting stuff on my calendar.

151

:

I don't want on my calendar.

152

:

Well, they don't have the rules.

153

:

They don't know the process.

154

:

They don't know how we choose who

we put on the calendar because

155

:

strangers can't get on my calendar.

156

:

And I was so busy and I, and I was

trying to solve that problem with

157

:

this human that I didn't even know

this was somebody, you know, I had

158

:

never met, never seen, never anything.

159

:

And they're trying to do this stuff.

160

:

Well, then I started getting

more uncomfortable because.

161

:

They're ruining relationships or not

really ruining them, but causing harm

162

:

to them because my client would say,

Hey, I can't, I can't reschedule this.

163

:

You know, I'm busy during this time.

164

:

And I'm like, yes, I know

this, but my VA did not.

165

:

So it got very, I'm just going to

call it very sketchy for a little bit.

166

:

And so what happened, which is also

not a brilliant move on my part is

167

:

they were still getting paid for doing.

168

:

The same thing I was still having to

do, but I felt like, okay, well, I

169

:

told him that I wanted him to do this

every month for like the next year.

170

:

And so I guess I should just keep

paying them for doing something

171

:

that I'm still really having to do.

172

:

So then suddenly my business

has taken me more time.

173

:

It's taken me money to pay someone

who's not helping with my time.

174

:

And so it got really messy really quick.

175

:

And I think that's a great place

to kick this conversation off Jill,

176

:

because I see this happen all the time.

177

:

Speaker 4: Oh, I'm sure I am sure.

178

:

Cause I, I, I don't have much experience

delegating, but I have started to try.

179

:

And being on a team, I feel is

a little bit different when.

180

:

There's still someone else still getting

to me versus in my own business when I'm

181

:

the one that has to figure it all out and

be able to do this and avoid a situation

182

:

of learning, like how you just described.

183

:

Um, so I'm, I'm glad we're

having this kind of conversation.

184

:

We can see those, those ways not to do it.

185

:

That is definitely not the way to do it.

186

:

Speaker 3: So let's fast forward

a little bit in this example.

187

:

I bumped my head repeatedly

before I got this right.

188

:

I'm gonna say that.

189

:

I bumped my head hard because I ended

up replacing that VA with another one

190

:

who also I didn't give instructions to.

191

:

And then I realized, you know what?

192

:

It's not them.

193

:

It's me.

194

:

It's me not giving the instructions

that I need to have very hard

195

:

Boundaries around like my calendar.

196

:

Don't add people to my

calendar that I don't know.

197

:

That's the first thing.

198

:

Don't add people to my

calendar who haven't been pre

199

:

approved to add to my calendar.

200

:

I get a say so in what I do with my time.

201

:

And so those were the first rules.

202

:

I know that that sounds very basic

and it is, but those were the first

203

:

rules I set up is I need to check

in of the most important things.

204

:

I need nothing added to my calendar

that you don't ask me about first.

205

:

I need you to be kind to my

clients because my clients are

206

:

what makes our business go round.

207

:

And like, so those were some

of the first rules I set up.

208

:

And the funny thing is, is it changed

VA because the VA now knows what to do.

209

:

Now understand some of the pieces.

210

:

So it took a long time.

211

:

It took a long time to get there,

but I have like, for example, I

212

:

have one account that gets, I don't

know, 15 or 16, 000 emails a month.

213

:

It's a business one, but I

get that many emails a month.

214

:

If I didn't have someone to help

me manage that, I would never know

215

:

what comes into that email, into

that inbox because it's too much.

216

:

But having someone who can go in and

And say, okay, this is not, we don't

217

:

even know how you got our address.

218

:

So this one's deleted.

219

:

We don't know who you are.

220

:

This one's deleted because this,

this particular email is not

221

:

for any kind of solicitation.

222

:

It is only client related.

223

:

So if they're not on the, what I'm

going to call the approved client

224

:

list, that there's no, there's

no correspondence necessary.

225

:

Okay.

226

:

But when someone that is a client

SOS's, they send out something,

227

:

Hey, I really need this.

228

:

And it's kind of an emergency.

229

:

I'm in the middle of launch

and something's happened, or

230

:

I'm in the middle of something.

231

:

And now I don't know

what to do about this.

232

:

That's really important

for me to get immediately.

233

:

That's not a, this can wait until

we do our check in this afternoon.

234

:

This is a, Hey, you've got an SOS.

235

:

You need to check.

236

:

So having the ability to give them.

237

:

That kind of information, that

kind of tournamenting as we call

238

:

it, they can decide if something

is really important or not.

239

:

That, that means 16, 000 ish emails a

month can boil down to a handful for

240

:

me because they also have the ability

to, if a client asks for, let's say,

241

:

XYZ, they already have the list that

says they're approved to have XYZ.

242

:

Speaker 4: So

243

:

Speaker 3: they can send

it without asking me.

244

:

They already knew, know what the rules

are and our rule list for that particular

245

:

inbox is enormous, but the time that

it takes off of my calendar and off my

246

:

plate is, I mean, it's priceless because

I don't deal with much on that and that

247

:

gives me the ability to do other things.

248

:

So.

249

:

Is that, is that making sense, Jill?

250

:

Like, am I putting enough pieces in

there to make sure that that's clear?

251

:

I think so.

252

:

Speaker 4: Um, and what I'm interested

now in knowing a little bit more about

253

:

is like that process part that you have

to figure out and before you even get

254

:

to that part, cause we may not even have

enough time for that in this episode.

255

:

The, the piece that I think

I'd like to ask you is.

256

:

You're fast forwarded part,

you figured out you needed to

257

:

come up with some instructions.

258

:

What happens when you find that you're

missing pieces still, because you

259

:

know the process so well, you know how

to, how you two are going to do it.

260

:

How do you step back and figure out how

to tell how to figure out those process

261

:

steps without skipping any, even if you

do like that, that whole bit, I guess.

262

:

Speaker 3: So every time that I would

meet with my VA at the time, I would

263

:

add something else to the rules because

they would ask me a question and I would

264

:

understand, okay, that's not clear.

265

:

So let's add this in here.

266

:

So it became a thing of, they actually

trained me in what they needed to know,

267

:

Speaker 4: right?

268

:

Speaker 3: I have it in my head,

but how do you know client A?

269

:

Is needing something that they can't have.

270

:

How do you know client A needs to come

through before any of the other clients?

271

:

How do you know what the queue is?

272

:

Because we operate in a queue around

here of, you know, if you're in the

273

:

queue to be published, let's say we're

doing a publishing project for you.

274

:

We have a publishing queue.

275

:

So there's an order to it.

276

:

If someone's asking a question and

they're not in the queue, there's a

277

:

different response they get then, then,

Hey, it's going to be Tuesday of next

278

:

week that you're going to get this

message or it, it just, it empowers

279

:

them to be able to be you and gives you

the ability not to deal with some of

280

:

the minutiae, some of the things that.

281

:

You know, there's a phrase that,

that we all like to use, but this

282

:

is in practice of working on your

business instead of in your business.

283

:

If I continue to do all the things in

the queue, if I continue to do all of

284

:

my own Brazilian emails, if I continue

to do all those things, I'm going

285

:

to, that's all I'm going to get done.

286

:

I'm not going to have the ability

to, Step back and look at the big

287

:

view of the business and say, how can

we make the whole business better?

288

:

How can we add to the team?

289

:

How can we do some of these big things?

290

:

Because I'm too busy

answering 16, 000 emails.

291

:

So an assistant of any kind is for

the purpose of delegating to them

292

:

something that takes something

off you as the owner's plate.

293

:

Delegating because we don't like something

is a great place to start, but it may

294

:

be the hardest place to start when you

start delegating because if you hate it,

295

:

you don't have the process figured out.

296

:

And if you don't have the process

figured out, and then you try to give

297

:

it to somebody else, then they may

not understand the process either.

298

:

So, And I will say, I know we're

tapping into a lot of pieces, but when

299

:

you start out to delegate, it's very

hard to want to pay a lot of money

300

:

to delegate something when you're not

sure if it's going to help you or not.

301

:

Speaker 4: So a

302

:

Speaker 3: lot of people will take

the shortcut of hiring someone

303

:

very cheaply who doesn't actually

know what questions to ask you.

304

:

So one of the people that I hired way, way

back, I recognize I still was the problem.

305

:

Let me be clear.

306

:

I was the problem, but they didn't

even know enough about emails to be

307

:

able to ask me questions about clients.

308

:

They, they were still trying to

figure out the difference between

309

:

the inbox and the spam folder.

310

:

And like, so you've got to be very

careful that you're not trying to

311

:

cut, cut the cost in the wrong place.

312

:

Speaker 4: And

313

:

Speaker 3: one of the best things

I ever did was hire someone

314

:

who was so versed in email.

315

:

They actually taught me

things about my email.

316

:

I didn't even know like that, but that

was a very amazing thing that happened

317

:

because they literally trained me as

I was training what I wanted in my

318

:

list of rules and things to follow.

319

:

They literally trained

me in what they needed.

320

:

Because they had done it so long,

they understood, you know, do you

321

:

have a client roster that needs

to be, you know, the priority?

322

:

These are the questions

they were asking me.

323

:

And I'm like, Holy moly,

that helps so much.

324

:

So the cost of that assistant was

quite a lot more than the other one.

325

:

But the value of my time

was exponentially increased.

326

:

Changed because I then had someone

who helped me get a list together,

327

:

who helped me put things in an

order that someone could follow.

328

:

Right.

329

:

So,

330

:

Speaker 4: Ooh, I have one last

question based off of that.

331

:

Cause it sounds like it would almost

be too much time spent on the business

332

:

owners side to figure out a lot of those.

333

:

pieces that they would need to tell

someone or that they'd have to keep

334

:

coming back to give more instructions.

335

:

So is delegating the right way really

worth our time to figuring it out?

336

:

Speaker 3: I'm going to say a resounding

yes because if I didn't have others

337

:

I could delegate to, if I didn't

have team Like members in place.

338

:

I wouldn't even have time

for the clients we have.

339

:

I would never have grown any in any way.

340

:

I'd still probably have the one or

two clients in the very beginning

341

:

because that's all my time would allow.

342

:

But now I have the benefit of the team

being there to support my calendar.

343

:

Cause that's what it boils down to.

344

:

They support my calendar so that

the business can run without me.

345

:

And I think it's really, really important

when you are hanging out with us.

346

:

And let me just put this out there.

347

:

There are lots of people who will

teach you how to make a lot of

348

:

money and do it the really hard way.

349

:

And then you get to the,

you know, end of your life.

350

:

You're not healthy.

351

:

You're, you know, you might have

made a lot of money, but you don't

352

:

have the health that you could

have had by not having the stress.

353

:

You don't have the relationships with

your family that you could have had.

354

:

By spending some time with them.

355

:

So our community, let's be

very open and clear about this.

356

:

Our community is about building things to

support our lives and not take our lives.

357

:

So it's about building a business.

358

:

We own that does not own us

without delegating deal there.

359

:

It's not possible to have a

business that doesn't own you.

360

:

It, it owns you because

you can't delegate.

361

:

Okay.

362

:

So delegation to me is the key

to setting things in motion.

363

:

It's just knowing how to

delegate, when to delegate.

364

:

It's those pieces.

365

:

Speaker 4: And maybe in our next

episode, we'll talk about those

366

:

pieces and yeah, have a lot more fun

with some of the delegating stuff.

367

:

Speaker 3: Here's some more confessions.

368

:

I think that's what I hear the most.

369

:

We do want to invite everybody though.

370

:

We don't want to like close out this

podcast without inviting everyone to,

371

:

we have an open house every month for

Groundwork Brigade Mastermind that you

372

:

are welcome to come, you know, message

us, come head over to mysexybusiness.

373

:

com.

374

:

The link will be in the show notes,

but we do want to invite you to

375

:

come and check out the community.

376

:

Because we have a community of

entrepreneurs that we feel like

377

:

we're the home for where they can

learn, especially if they don't

378

:

know how to do a lot of things.

379

:

Like if, if they're learning and we're

all learning, let me make that clear.

380

:

We're all learning, but we'd love

to invite you to the open house.

381

:

So you can come and check out a

community who is learning together,

382

:

who are implementing the things

we talk about on this podcast.

383

:

And.

384

:

Lots of experience in the group,

lots of new people in the group.

385

:

So it's, it's a mixed, I think that that's

a really important thing to say too.

386

:

Some people have been in business for

decades and some people are brand new.

387

:

And it's a great, great place

for support, for community, for

388

:

learning, for rocking your business.

389

:

That's what I'm going to say.

390

:

Speaker 4: Yep.

391

:

Really having that business

that doesn't own you.

392

:

That you own.

393

:

Speaker 3: Yes.

394

:

Yes.

395

:

And yes.

396

:

So thank you for being with us

today in the BBG studio, Jill.

397

:

Thank you for being here with

me and asking great questions.

398

:

Speaker 4: Thanks, Kim.

399

:

And thank you listening

today and in the future.

400

:

And we'll see you in the studio next time.

401

:

Love y'all.

Links

Chapters

Video

More from YouTube

More Episodes
71. Team Series - Why Is Delegating So Hard To Learn The Right Way
00:28:06
70. Team Series - Our Process of Learning to Delegate, Build a Team, and Find a Team
00:36:57
69. Team Series - Delegation - Finding, Building, or Joining the Right One
00:31:50
68. Creepy Marketing & Applying for Jobs
00:25:10
67. BBG Season 2 Trailer
00:24:47
66. Season 1 Wrap Up
00:16:53
65. Messy vs Sloppy - Versus Series
00:24:00
64. What is the difference between a Freebie & a Micro Offer - Versus Series VS
00:25:18
63. What is the difference between a Pitch & an Offer - Versus Series VS
00:22:15
62. What is the difference between Desperate & Irresistible Marketing - Versus Series VS
00:19:37
61. What is the difference between a Joint Venture Partner & an Investor - Versus Series VS
00:22:37
60. What is the difference between Affiliates & Joint Ventures - Versus Series VS
00:14:45
59. What Is The Difference Between Collaboration & Joint Ventures - Versus Series VS
00:12:51
58. How Do I Get More Sales and Not Be Sleazy?
00:17:14
57. Do You See Your Clients As Investors?
00:15:38
56. How Can I Stay on Track in Business?
00:18:55
55. How Many Times Do I Have to Tell You?
00:19:01
54. How Haters Grow You
00:17:56
53. Shortcuts vs Shortcutting
00:15:48
52. Under the Influence
00:17:28
51. Happy New Year 2024
00:12:48
50. 50th BBG Christmas Special
00:09:22
49. Proactive Vs Reactive
00:21:54
48. The Universe Knows
00:21:37
47. Your Word For The Year 2024
00:18:44
46. Taking a Break in Business - Special Edition
00:24:12
45. Are You In It For The Long Haul?
00:23:48
44. Pop Ups on Websites - Yay or Nay?
00:13:20
43. You Inc. (Incorporated)
00:14:30
42. How Much Messy Is Too Much Messy
00:19:38
41. Everything Changes and Everything Stays the Same
00:31:05
40. The Clarity is Real - Living Proof
00:14:48
39. Paying for Ads on Social Media - Yay or Nay
00:15:22
38. Tetrising vs Tournamenting
00:20:44
37. Delegating What we Love or What Needs to be Done
00:13:02
36. Princess And The Popcorn
00:19:08
35. Being Ready To Ride
00:14:32
34. Who's Your Entrepreneurial Supporter
00:18:06
33. The Sound Of Crickets
00:24:17
32. Making Yourself Promotable
00:21:26
31. The Consequence Of The One Thing
00:28:24
30. The ONE thing
00:23:24
29. What to do at the end of Bootstrapping
00:23:49
28. Recharging Your Batteries as an Entrepreneur
00:16:36
27. Emotional Roller Coaster of Entrepreneurship
00:27:00
26. Recipe for WHO we should learn from
00:21:55
25. How Long Does Clarity Take?
00:28:21
24. To People or Not to People
00:26:23
23. Listening
00:24:57
22. Failure leads to success
00:22:38
21. Build it and they will come
00:15:18
20. Too busy being busy
00:24:06
19. Pricing for Solutions
00:20:34
18. Feedback, Feedback and More Feedback
00:24:46
17. Growing Your Team - Growing Your Business
00:31:37
16. Team vs Posse - Growing Your Business
00:19:55
15. Team Members - Growing Your Business
00:27:36
14. Microwave Vs Crockpot - Growing Your Business
00:19:36
13. The Illusion of Doing It ALL - Growing Your Business
00:19:38
12. Collaboration - Growing Your Business Series
00:25:37
11. Squirrels, Unicorns & Shiny Things - Protecting Your Time Series
00:21:29
10. Tech Toys - Protecting Your Time Series
00:19:20
9. Stacking and Batching - Protecting Your Time Series
00:26:06
8. Meetings - Protecing Your Time Series
00:19:56
7. Delegating - Protecting Your Time Series
00:24:28
6. Bootstrapping, Money vs Time - Protecting Your Time Series
00:28:59
5. Cash Over Ego - Getting Started in Business
00:27:56
4. Clarity - Getting Started In Business Series
00:35:14
3. Mindset - Getting Started In Business Series
00:32:59
2. Imposter Syndrome - Getting Started In Business Series
00:32:10
1. Finding Your Passion - Getting Started in Business Series
00:35:59
trailer Buckets & Boom Gates Trailer
00:09:45