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MC Fireside Chats - February 14th, 2024
14th February 2024 • MC Fireside Chats • Modern Campground LLC
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In a recent episode of MC Fireside Chats, hosted by Brian Searl, the conversation delved into the evolving world of outdoor hospitality, with a focus on the glamping industry. The panel included a diverse group of industry leaders: Zach Stoltenberg, Chris Jeub, Alessandro van de Loo, Stephanie Bias, Yves Ballenegger, and Chelsi Low. Each brought their unique perspective and expertise to the table, offering insights into the challenges and opportunities facing the sector. Zach Stoltenberg, known for his work in architectural design and planning, shared his experiences and the complexities involved in creating sustainable and off-grid glamping sites, including a fascinating project in the Bahamas. This project, involving the development of uninhabited islands into an eco-friendly resort, highlighted the logistical challenges and innovative solutions required to bring such a vision to life. Stoltenberg’s passion for his current projects shone through as he discussed the importance of designing spaces that not only respect the environment but also provide guests with a luxurious and unique outdoor experience. Chris Jeub, discussed his role in helping landowners develop profitable glamping operations. His insights into the importance of creating memorable guest experiences and the potential revenue streams from additional amenities like propane service and guided hikes underscored the entrepreneurial spirit driving the glamping industry forward. Jeub’s dedication to education through his website and courses for aspiring glampsite owners reflects his commitment to nurturing the growth of the sector. Alessandro van de Loo brought an international perspective to the conversation, sharing the story of his family’s business, Vacanze col cuore, and its expansion across Europe. Van de Loo’s discussion of the European glamping market, including the blending of traditional camping with luxury experiences and the challenges of customer loyalty, provided a valuable comparison to trends in the United States and Canada. His focus on building a guest community and leveraging direct bookings to foster a personal connection with guests highlighted the importance of brand identity and customer service in the competitive hospitality landscape. Stephanie Bias, representing Camp Aramoni, offered her views on the significance of partnering with local businesses to enhance the guest experience. Her emphasis on collaboration with activity providers and restaurants to create comprehensive packages for guests illustrated the community-oriented approach to outdoor hospitality. Bias’s insights into the benefits of engaging with local chambers of commerce and leveraging the unique appeal of glamping to attract attention within these networks underscored the symbiotic relationship between glampsites and their local communities. Yves Ballenegger, the founder of Groovy Yurts, shared his passion for authentic Mongolian yurts and the cultural and environmental considerations that go into their design and use. Ballenegger’s dedication to providing a genuine and sustainable outdoor living experience through his yurts highlighted the growing consumer interest in eco-friendly and culturally rich accommodations. His discussion of the challenges of adapting traditional structures to meet modern expectations for comfort and sustainability provided a fascinating insight into the balance between authenticity and innovation in glamping. Chelsea Low, the owner of Aefintyr Outdoors, shared her journey of developing a glamping site from scratch, emphasizing the importance of creating a connection with nature and offering guests a rustic yet comfortable experience. Low’s focus on catering to guests seeking solitude and an authentic outdoor experience, along with her plans to expand the range of activities and amenities offered, reflected the personalized approach that has become a hallmark of successful glamping operations. Her story underscored the challenges and rewards of building a glamping business and the importance of listening to guest feedback to continually improve the experience. The episode of MC Fireside Chats offered a comprehensive overview of the current state and future prospects of the outdoor hospitality and glamping industry. Through the diverse experiences and viewpoints of the panelists, listeners gained insights into the importance of design, customer experience, community engagement, and sustainability in creating successful outdoor hospitality ventures. As the industry continues to evolve, the conversation highlighted the creativity, innovation, and passion driving its growth, offering inspiration and guidance for current and aspiring professionals in the field.

Transcripts

Speaker:

This is MC Fireside Chats, a weekly show

featuring conversations with thought

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leaders, entrepreneurs, and outdoor

hospitality experts who share their

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insights to help your business succeed.

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Hosted by Brian Searle, the founder

and CEO of Insider Perks, empowered by

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insights from modern Campground, the most

innovative news source in the industry.

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Brian Searl: Welcome everybody to

another episode of MC Fireside Chats.

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My name is Brian Cyril with

Insider Perks sitting outside.

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'cause for the last two weeks I had to sit

inside, so I decided I'm coming out here.

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It's outdoor hospitality.

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It's negative 10 degrees Celsius

in Calgary, pretty cold and windy.

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So hopefully I won't have to talk much and

you won't hear the wind going into my mic.

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But super excited to be here for

a recurring glamping episode.

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Welcoming back some of our

recurring guests both old and new.

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So Zach from Clockwork.

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We'll have all you guys introduce

yourselves very briefly in a second.

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Tell us about what you do because

that from Clockwork is back from a

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trip into The Bahamas, which hopefully

he'll tell us a little bit about.

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Maybe Chris is back, one of our

recurring guests from Colorado, right?

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Chris?

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Still terribly sad that I had to give

away your wine at TSA, but I don't know.

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I apologize for that.

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Chris Jeub: I'm terribly

sad about that too.

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Brian Searl: I tried to drink it, man.

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Like we had to go anyway, whatever.

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Okay and then welcome a

couple new recurring guests,

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Alessandro and Stephanie.

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And then we have another recurring

guest who's gonna join us next week too.

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She just was on a flight

at this current time.

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And then we've got our

special guest here, Chelsi.

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And Yves.

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And let's just go around the room

and maybe introduce everybody.

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Just give a brief bio of who you guys are.

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Who wants to start?

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Nobody.

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Oh, I'll start.

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Chris Jeub: I'll start.

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Okay.

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I'm Chris Jub.

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I call myself the glamping

guy online Glampingguy.com.

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I help landowners build safe,

legal, and profitable glamping

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operations in their private property.

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I own and operate Monument Glamping

here in Monument, Colorado.

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And we have two properties

12 units we're in.

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We're in review for up to

thirty-four units coming this summer.

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Can't wait.

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So that's me.

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Brian Searl: Awesome.

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Thank you.

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Chris.

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Who's next?

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Let's next.

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Alright, there we go.

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I was gonna say, let's do

the recurring guest anyway.

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So go ahead, Stephanie.

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Stephanie Bias: Okay.

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So I'm Stephanie.

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I am the communications

director at Canberra.

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We are in Illinois at 90

minutes, Southwest of Chicago.

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Near Starbrook State Park, if you've

heard of that State park before.

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We have 11 units and I figured out how to

get my background with our units there.

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So we have 10, and I'm excited to be here.

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Thank you.

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Brian Searl: Awesome.

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Thanks for joining us.

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Alessandro, you wanna go?

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Alessandro van de Loo: Yeah, sure.

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I'm Alessandro van de Loo from

the Netherlands, or at least

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I'm based in the Netherlands.

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We have a family business

operating nine glamping locations.

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Eight of them are in Italy,

one is in the Netherlands.

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So I'm doing it with my

father and my brother.

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And don't know how much you know about

European glamping scene, but there

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are quite some big chains, building

very big resorts at the moment.

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And we try to offer like smaller

destinations and be boutique style player.

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And yeah, we are building

that at the moment.

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Brian Searl: Awesome.

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I'm excited to talk to you a little bit

more about that and to have you thank

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you for being here as a recurring guest.

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I know a little bit about, I'd say

the European clamping market from the

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guests on the show, but I think the goal

of having you here is to help us all

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learn a little bit more about that and

then share information where we can.

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So Zach,

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Zach Stoltenberg: Zach Stoltenberg.

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I'm the director of Outdoor

Hospitality for Clockwork.

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I'm a licensed architect and our firm has

been working in the outdoor hospitality

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industry for about the last three years.

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And we partner with landowners,

with developers, entrepreneurs,

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really anybody that wants to

build or develop a clamping site.

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And we as architects, we specialize in

the design, the master planning and then

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the permitting and approval side to, to

get through kinda your planning and zoning

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process and get a budget put together.

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And build your resort.

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So that's what we do.

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We help people build glamping resorts.

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Brian Searl: All over too.

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I wanna talk about The Bahamas and all

that kind of stuff, but yeah, definitely

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a good person to have on the show.

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Thanks for being here.

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Zach, as always.

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Chelsi, let's see if I

can pronounce this right.

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Aefintyr?

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Chelsi Low: Yes.

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Brian Searl: All right.

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Chelsi Low: Thank you.

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Brian.

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Brian Searl: Tell us who, one

of our special guests here.

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Chelsi Low: My name is Chelsi Low and I

own and operate Aefintyr, a small glamping

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operation in southeastern Minnesota.

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Our main, kind of main attraction is the

Driftless area and Whitewater State Park

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which is well known in the region here.

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I have 11 units and my specialty

is treehouse camper cabins,

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and then hike in glamping.

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That is very rustic for folks

who are looking for a little

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bit more rugged experience.

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I have some bell tents and then also

some outdoor beds that I hand built that

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have clear roofs on them and screens.

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You can really get a good night's sleep

with the experience of sleeping outside.

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Brian Searl: Awesome.

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I can't,

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Chelsi Low: and I've been working

on this since:

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opened my doors actually Memorial

Day weekend this last year.

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So just getting up and running.

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Brian Searl: Awesome.

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I can't wait to learn more about

Aefintyr and kinda that journey

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would be interesting, I think

to dive into a little bit too.

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Yves.

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Yves Ballenegger: I'm Yves from

Groovy Yurts, founder of Groovy Yurts.

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We import authentic Mongolian Yurts since

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We have a couple of yurts on

our own, but our specialty is

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really the sale and the delivery.

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We also helped set up of

those authentic beauties.

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One here, one right here as well.

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This miniature and this.

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Brian Searl: Are they, oh,

I was gonna ask if they were

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actually that big, but go ahead.

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Sorry.

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Yves Ballenegger: There's one, but they

go up to 40 feet and most traditionally

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bit between I'd say around 20 feet are the

most traditional and the most efficient.

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Passion for Mongolia, passion

for those yurts, and this where

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we're trying to bring to our

customers across North America,

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which we do with our own vehicles.

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So we're nomads too.

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Brian Searl: Awesome.

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Super excited to dive into

what Groovy Yurts has to offer.

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So I think we'll start with

Yves and Chelsi in a second.

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But before we do guys, recurring guests,

is there anything that has come across

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your desk that you feel like we should be

paying attention to or talking about here

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before we dive into our special guests

and the glamping industry as a whole?

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No, everybody's so quiet today.

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All right.

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Let's start with let's start

with Yves at Groovy Yurts since

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we were just talking to him.

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So tell us tell us a

little about Groovy Yurt.

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Yves.

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Yves Ballenegger: Thank you.

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We, we are possibly the

happiest yurt salesmen on Earth.

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And and have been and there's

a few reasons for that.

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The number one reason is we're

lucky to work with these Mongolian

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manufacturers in Mongolia.

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We're trying to source our

products mostly on the countryside.

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And the other reason is that

we're the direct link between

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them and the, and our customers.

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We I'm a trucker by passion and trade.

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We've got a couple vehicles on

the road and a few times a year we

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go on those epic delivery tours.

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We would, we're based in Canada,

in Alexandria, so that's close to

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Montreal between Montreal and Ottawa.

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And we crossed the continent.

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We would go all the way to Alaska

Crossing Canada, then down to

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California and come back trying to

really group those orders and to bring

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this service and this love of yurts

to our customers helping them set up.

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And so that's what we do.

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We're a small team of

about 10, 12 people here.

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That's of course not counting the very

extended family of our Mongolian suppliers

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in Mongolia who are all independent.

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Yurts, Mongolian, yurts.

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There's A, I don't know.

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How are you guys familiar

with Mongolian Yurts?

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Brian Searl: No, that's what

I was gonna ask you and to our

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recurring guests into the new ones.

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Please feel free to jump

in, ask questions, talk to

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whoever we're talking to.

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Just so I have to talk less,

and then the audience is more

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interested, but I was gonna ask

you like, what is the difference?

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What sets Mongolian-built yurts apart?

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Yves Ballenegger: A lot of things.

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The main characteristic is

that this dwelling has been

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shaped over thousands of years.

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And rarely will you find a dwelling

that's so efficient and that really

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combines efficiency very interesting

traditions, respect of the environment.

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And so Mongolian yurts are used by nomads

in a climate that's actually very dry.

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So we did have to accommodate more

humid climates, something that

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we are very comfortable with now.

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The, and I would, I can maybe compare

the Mongolian yurt with the modern

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yurts that you might know and far from

me, from criticizing modern yurts,

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but really showing the pros and cons.

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The you will see the Mongolian yurt

is usually a little lower, and this

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is the result of thousands of years

of very slow, fine-tuning by this

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extreme weather of Mongolia, which

is stuck between China and Russia.

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Extremely cold in the winter

minus 40 due at this time.

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And that can last for weeks.

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It's quite warm in the summer.

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Very strong winds in the grasslands.

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This gave this very aerodynamic shape.

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And what's interesting is that there's not

only a whole technique that came out of

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this very slow development, but it's also

connected to the Mongolian traditions.

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These nomads are phenomenal.

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They might be one of the most advanced

culture on the planet, depending how you

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look at it, but they live in harmony with

nature without, instead of imposing on it.

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So the yurt is actually not anchored to

the ground, not to harm the earth first.

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Symbolic an interesting one.

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So that shows how

aerodynamic the structure is.

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There's ways to anchor it.

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Additionally, but still this

compact also helps to keep

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this dwelling warm in winter.

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So in the midst of the winter when it's

very cold they don't have any wood.

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Usually there's very little.

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Which is actually dried dung.

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And that works.

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So the yurt is also very well insulated.

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It's insulated with felt sheep,

wool, and a beautiful felt.

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That's actually yeah, a

hundred percent sheep wool.

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So a hundred percent sustainable.

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It'll decompose.

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So this entire structure will

actually go back to the ground.

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If it's unused, however, use it.

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If you maintain, it'll last forever.

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And with this new concept of being

able to fix something so you can

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constantly upgrade the yurt if necessary.

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We carry spare parts, but actually our

customers often even built their own if

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needed, not that they need so, so often.

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So and quickly back to those Mongolian

traditions that are interesting, and it's

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also something that our customers should

there be glampers or or dwellers like.

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Is you step in a Mongolian, yurt

or ger, which is the name in

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Mongolia, and you're somewhere else.

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So just one step right foot first

you're propelled on the other

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side of the planet in a dwelling

that's a little bit like a womb.

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It's very colorful.

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You might see from afar

it's all hand painted.

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Like those.

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Stools that I have behind you will

see the same patterns or none.

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Now we also make unpainted yurts.

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So you I'll guide you in.

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You'll step right foot first

into this yurt, and you'll go

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you'll go clockwise inside.

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You'll follow the sun that's shining

into the yurt during the course of

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the day from the very large dome

that they have, huh, on, on top.

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Then you'll notice that the Mongolians

will sit you to the north because all

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direction, cardinal direction have

their importance and very close to

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North American culture native cultures.

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So they actually believe they're cousins.

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Then you start noticing, oh, the lattice

wood is attached with camel rawhide.

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The ropes are made of horsehair.

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You can't see the felt because it's

hidden by the, a liner of cotton.

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But it's it's sheeple and so the

sound is is damped in that yurt.

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It's giving it a very comfortable feel.

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Now it's not only comfortable

just for the sound of it, but it's

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super easy to keep warm in winter.

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Yes, you have to bend to enter the yurt.

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I'm six five.

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As soon as I do a step inside

pop, I've got enough headroom.

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So it's much more spacious than it looks.

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And then the same insulation

will work in the summer.

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So there's a polycarbon cover that we use

here in North America on top of the felt.

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We add a another layer of

house wrap for moisture.

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So this insulation will stop the sunstroke

and so you won't cook in your yurt during

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the summer, and you will lift the side

of the dwelling, creating a natural drop.

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Remember, the yurt is not anchored,

so you can actually lift those sites.

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So it's actually air conditioning

and has been for thousands of years.

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So it's fascinating how an ancient concept

can actually be used and be almost more

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efficient than their modern countertops.

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Brian Searl: So Let me ask

you this Zachary architecture

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experience, experiential expert.

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What comes to mind when

you hear all about these?

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Zach Stoltenberg: I'm intrigued

to know have you had any of these

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traditional units evaluated from

like an R value perspective?

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One thing that we've run into.

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Recently, especially in some of those

northern state climates, is states

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that are enforcing requirements

for energy co energy code.

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So being able to come back and say,

Hey, this assembly, this horn, this

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particular unit that we've chosen,

this is the equivalent of our value

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of these walls to meet compliance

with a local requirement regulation.

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Yves Ballenegger: So it's

an excellent question.

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And yeah, let me actually just

grab a piece of felt here.

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Brian Searl: This guy is prepared.

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Have you ever seen anybody

as prepared for our show?

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Zach Stoltenberg: I'm just,

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Stephanie Bias: I love all the experience.

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Yves Ballenegger: I'm in my office,

so of course I've got everything.

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Zach Stoltenberg: I hundred percent

believe him now, and he says he's the

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happiest yurt salesman in the world.

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Yves Ballenegger: And I can get

you a yurt out of the warehouse.

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That's a barn just next to it.

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Got about 50 of them.

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So if you need anything, just ask.

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So here are two layers of felt.

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So that felt, although it's an excellent

insulator, is only something like, I

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think three point I'll have to check,

I should have been more prepared.

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3.5 r, 3.5 an inch.

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So it's good, but we only can, we can

only put in the current structure up

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to three layers that say to insulate.

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So you won't get to these these

R values that are requested by

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some of those municipalities.

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The R-value, however, doesn't

take in account, and correct

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me, Zach, if I'm wrong, doesn't

take the in account the volume.

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Here we have, actually, this one of

course is quite small, but you can

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estimate the size, you can look.

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This one is about 20 feet in diameter

and this is the most common in Mongolia

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16, 20, up to twenty-two feet max.

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We sell larger, but we promote those.

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Why?

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Because it's a very compact volume

with still a very decent insulation.

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So to keep this warm,

it doesn't take much.

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And so no, we can't reach those values.

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Some municipalities are actually or

building inspectors, are actually open to

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this concept and understand that actually.

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Even though we don't have that,

our value, we're using way less

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energy to keep this warm or cool.

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We're actually also working on a kind of

a hybrid year It's that should keep most

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of the, of these ancient qualities while

being able to respond to those requests.

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But that's not gonna be on the

market before I think a year

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or probably a year and a half.

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Brian Searl: That answer your

question, Zach or I don't really

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know too much about our value, so

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Zach Stoltenberg: I think the key with

a unique structure like this is just

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what, what was described, you have to

look at this as a whole the entire unit.

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And there's some provisions

in code now that are starting

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to evolve more that direction.

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Taking the entirety of the

structure and looking at what are

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what's your total energy usage?

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What is the lighting?

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What is the HVAC?

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Our value is one component of it, but it's

only one small piece of that component.

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There's also additional requirements

for continuous insulation.

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So one of the things I think is

really cool about the traditional

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structures is that the entirety of

the outside is one, complete envelope.

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You, the only opening you have

is your door and even that door.

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As was mentioned, it's a lower,

smaller door, right to keep

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more of that energy inside.

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And then the only natural lighting

that's coming in is through that

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kind of Oculus skylight at the top.

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So I think there's, looking at it from

the whole big picture it's interesting

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that there, there are those components

and like I said, this has evolved over

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thousands of years to be energy efficient.

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It's just a matter of being able to

package that document it and prove

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it, to a building inspector or a local

jurisdiction or official that, you know,

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hey, if you're just looking at a number

on a page, yeah we're gonna be an r

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value of seven or eight and your code

may be, 19, we're not gonna get there.

349

:

But if you look at the whole

big picture of it that, this is

350

:

still a very efficient structure.

351

:

Brian Searl: Awesome.

352

:

Anybody else have any questions for Yves?

353

:

We're gonna come back to him in

a few minutes, but All right.

354

:

Let's go to Chelsi at Aefintyr.

355

:

Chelsi, you're up north there.

356

:

Tell us a little bit about Aventere

and then at some point tell us

357

:

if you would be interested in

people hiking to in Mongolian

358

:

Dirt maze, but not the first Sure.

359

:

Not the first thing.

360

:

Let's talk about F Tier version.

361

:

Chelsi Low: Yeah.

362

:

So Aefintyr, as I mentioned it is in

the geography is in the Driftless area.

363

:

And for folks that are from Minnesota,

Iowa, Wisconsin and Illinois,

364

:

it is a, it's a beautiful area.

365

:

Lots of hills river valleys.

366

:

We have, great opportunities, of course,

for the typical, wildlife, wildflowers,

367

:

nature, observing, things like that.

368

:

Trout, but trout fishing

is a huge thing as well.

369

:

We got a lot of spring

fed streams and rivers.

370

:

So that's a hot item for recreation.

371

:

The area also does not have mosquitoes

near at, near the rate that we do in

372

:

a lot of other areas in the region.

373

:

Brian Searl: I thought you were

gonna say you didn't have it at all.

374

:

And I was like, why are you

not marketing that everywhere?

375

:

Chelsi Low: Ooh I never wear bug

spray when I'm out working and

376

:

I'm out in the woods all the time.

377

:

And people will come and visit me

especially from like North Central

378

:

Minnesota where the mosquitoes are

like, we joke, it's the state bird here.

379

:

And they're like, wow.

380

:

It really is true.

381

:

What people say about, the Driftless

region with the mosquitoes.

382

:

That's huge as well.

383

:

I think it just the people's comfort

being outdoors and not having

384

:

to worry about the bug spray and

swatting the bugs is a big draw too.

385

:

And hunting is huge as well.

386

:

Deer hunting and Turkey

hunting in particular, I.

387

:

And so the campground again I have been

working on this project since:

388

:

I built it from the ground up.

389

:

It was a raw piece of land.

390

:

It's 14 acres.

391

:

So I had a lot of lessons learned in

the development, getting all of the

392

:

permits going through that whole process.

393

:

I had extra fun with it because it's

actually on two different parcels, and

394

:

one of them is in a city jurisdiction,

and then the other part is in a county.

395

:

So it was like everything I.

396

:

I had to ask twice.

397

:

So in the covid you throw covid in there.

398

:

Anyway, it was just such a relief

to get through all of that.

399

:

I was inspired to do this because

of wilderness and nature trips

400

:

that I took as a kid and just

falling in love with that area.

401

:

I live in Rochester, Whitewater's

about 30 minutes, and it's just

402

:

such a relaxing, beautiful place

that I enjoyed going as a child.

403

:

And I was inspired to do something

other than the typical RV resorts

404

:

that they have, where it's just, it's

like a parking lot with the mode lawn.

405

:

Everybody's smashed in

there and the party scene.

406

:

Not everybody wants that, and there's

not really an outlet I guess for that.

407

:

So I really wanted to try to take that

idea of, I wanna have a place where

408

:

people who not that they don't wanna

have a good time, but they're really

409

:

looking to just get out in the woods.

410

:

Be in nature, connect with friends and

family have a quiet place, and then be

411

:

able to go out and experience all of

the great things that are in the area.

412

:

So my clients, they are they're

rugged independent people.

413

:

I don't get a lot of complaints.

414

:

They like to take care of themselves.

415

:

And I've divided things

into two categories.

416

:

I have three little treehouse cabins.

417

:

Two of them I actually, I'm finishing the

construction on and I hope they're up and

418

:

running here probably by the end of March.

419

:

So I have that's approachable.

420

:

People can drive up.

421

:

I.

422

:

Get their stuff out.

423

:

And then park.

424

:

The other piece is the hike in glamping,

which is a concept that I had to

425

:

really develop the last two years to

decide what I was going to do with it.

426

:

And I still am not committed

to structures, so who knows?

427

:

We could certainly look

at Mongolian Yurts.

428

:

I'm really exploring kind of

what else I should do as far

429

:

as some of the structures.

430

:

And I would like to get on a

rotation so that it changes.

431

:

But it's meant to give people a little bit

of a flavor of a wilderness experience.

432

:

So you need a backpack.

433

:

You can't bring your little

dot cart or anything.

434

:

It's not gonna work on the trail.

435

:

It's about a quarter mile

up to the top of the bluff.

436

:

And then people have a the

tent or the outdoor bed.

437

:

I provide linens towels if they wanna use

the bath house for a shower mattresses.

438

:

But it's still very basic.

439

:

It's meant to provide that

authentic camping experience.

440

:

So I, I don't have climate control.

441

:

People still feel the temperature

changes throughout the day.

442

:

They can hear the nature

outside, the coyotes, the birds

443

:

through the tent or the beds.

444

:

So it's definitely I had to even

really get to the bottom of, is this.

445

:

Glamping or not.

446

:

And I did, I committed to the word

glamping because I do have those creature

447

:

comfort comforts for provided, but it's

on the very rustic side of glamping.

448

:

So that's the clients that I'm trying

to serve and what I'm trying to do

449

:

my next steps, I really wanna look at

the experience and how I can partner

450

:

with like trout fishing guides people

that have expertise in some of the

451

:

recreation opportunities there.

452

:

And then I'm also really

interested in art.

453

:

So I've tried to connect I had an

artist come out this last summer.

454

:

She has a business called Paint and Hike,

and she takes people outdoors and has a

455

:

whole method for how you can do painting

while you're out outside in the woods.

456

:

And so I wanna get experiences

like that for people.

457

:

So that's kind of Aefintyr in a

nutshell, and I guess where I'm

458

:

at in the vision for the future.

459

:

Brian Searl: So I'm curious if

nobody else has any questions.

460

:

Alessandro van de Loo: Yeah, I think

if I may, I think it's really nice what

461

:

you're saying about asking yourself

the question is glamping or not?

462

:

Because in, in Europe we have been

asked a lot of times as we used

463

:

to own a tour operator like OTA.

464

:

It was quite big in Glimping holidays.

465

:

So a lot of people are asking us like,

what's the definition of glimping?

466

:

And it's a very hard question to answer.

467

:

And I was like, checking your

website a couple of minutes

468

:

ago and before you said that.

469

:

And I was like, really?

470

:

Wow, this really gives the right

vibe of what I personally think

471

:

is like really matching this name.

472

:

But I'm, yeah, I really like

to hear that in, in the States

473

:

it's like the same type of.

474

:

Of questions that we

have in Europe, actually.

475

:

Yeah.

476

:

We have no idea what, it's interesting.

477

:

Yeah.

478

:

Even here there's no idea,

like it's just a label.

479

:

You like put on it.

480

:

And at the end we believe it's

the customers who finally will

481

:

judge the success or the not

success of any initiative.

482

:

Chelsi Low: Yeah, I think there's

a lot of wisdom in that, and I have

483

:

really tried to get a lot of feedback.

484

:

That's been a lot of fun.

485

:

Now having a full year under my belt

with it is seeing what people like.

486

:

My, the Treehouse cabins are,

by far the highest occupancy.

487

:

I haven't really done much with

marketing other than the online

488

:

travel options that are out there, and

then that, that really is a mix too.

489

:

It's the line between what is

vacation rental and what's not,

490

:

but I've definitely, I've probably

about 50% I think of my bookings

491

:

were direct, which was super cool.

492

:

Just through my website, and then

Airbnb is my next biggest one.

493

:

And Hip Camp vrbo depending on the

unit, I can't, the cabins I'll list

494

:

on vrbo, but the rest of the property

isn't appropriate for that platform.

495

:

So I've just really been trying to put

myself out there and see, how I'm, who

496

:

I'm capturing through those channels.

497

:

But.

498

:

Yeah, it was, I think going with the

glamping was a good choice, to label

499

:

myself that way, but I try to be

very forward with people about, this

500

:

is a rugged experience, it's very,

your creature comforts will be met.

501

:

I'm all about customer service and

providing the essentials, but it takes

502

:

physical effort, to get up to the site.

503

:

And I have had people that have gotten up

there and it was just too much for them.

504

:

They're like, this is wilder than

I thought it was going to be.

505

:

And I, it's just gonna be too much.

506

:

So I've changed my the way I've

described things a little bit, and

507

:

I think I have a better way that

I'm presenting it to the public.

508

:

So they get there and I'm capturing

the right people and they're

509

:

excited to be there and not like

overwhelmed when they arrive.

510

:

Zach Stoltenberg: I wanted to ask hit

on one thing that you said earlier,

511

:

in this, you've got a year under your

belt, you're in this transitionary

512

:

period, and you're it sounds like

you're shifting your focus from the

513

:

accommodations piece into experience,

into building those guest experiences,

514

:

whether that's, the painting piece or

hiking or can you talk a little bit

515

:

more about that, how that's come about?

516

:

What are your thoughts as an

operator on what how important is

517

:

the experience component to it?

518

:

Chelsi Low: Yeah, for I, for the

folks that have that, I've been

519

:

reaching, who I would consider to be

my a picture of my typical guests.

520

:

I think I, I had it in my mind

initially that it was going to be

521

:

critical that I had lots of activities

and things for people to do.

522

:

And I actually found that one thing

that was so fascinating to me was I

523

:

had a lot of solo people that came and

men, women people of, early twenties,

524

:

all up the way into seventies.

525

:

It was quite an age range too.

526

:

And people just wanting peace

and quiet, they'd be like,

527

:

Chelsi, I just need to get away.

528

:

Like I, I need to get

away from technology.

529

:

I just need a place to be and

to think and be in the woods.

530

:

And so I tried to really listen to that.

531

:

And I have a couple guests.

532

:

I ask them if I could interview

them, and I will at some point.

533

:

Get with them.

534

:

And I just really wanna

kind of dive into that.

535

:

So I think maybe it was less

important than what I was thinking.

536

:

I think it, it was actually okay that

people could just come there and be there.

537

:

And so then I don't know if it's more of

I don't know if anybody's heard the term

538

:

like a Hermitage, which is like a place

where people go alone to be alone and

539

:

to do reflection and things like that.

540

:

So I think there could be

some opportunity there.

541

:

I do have other groups, the as far

as like the art classes go, or like

542

:

people that are looking to go with a

experienced trout fisher person, out

543

:

on the beautiful Whitewater River.

544

:

I would love to get into, I love to kayak.

545

:

And float down the river in tubes.

546

:

So I would love to be able to provide

opportunities like that for people.

547

:

And I think that I just, I need

to collect a little bit more data.

548

:

Some of those services are

already offered, so if I can't do

549

:

something that's just spectacularly

different, to differentiate myself,

550

:

I need to pick the ones that

maybe people aren't offering yet.

551

:

But I, overall, I would say

that I'm not as concerned about

552

:

that being a draw for guests.

553

:

I think it's more for me just looking

for additional revenue streams

554

:

because I don't have and developing

the business, I do want to have di

555

:

more options for people, if you will.

556

:

Not that they have to do those things.

557

:

But I cannot grow the business anymore.

558

:

The way that the topography and everything

of the land is, if I am going to grow

559

:

the business, I will need to find

another location to add to the portfolio.

560

:

Stephanie Bias: And what are your

guests currently doing for meals?

561

:

Are they cooking them on site

or what does that look like?

562

:

Chelsi Low: Yeah, great

question, Stephanie.

563

:

'cause that was another thing too.

564

:

You hear about the ha having

food on site and stuff.

565

:

They are bringing their own food.

566

:

I am investing in providing more

like cooking type amenities.

567

:

So I do have a couple propane

grills that are easily accessible.

568

:

I don't have them at each site.

569

:

But I do, I've got one up on the

bluff top, and then I have one of

570

:

'em down at the base area, if you

will, where the little cabins are.

571

:

So people definitely utilize the grills.

572

:

I have a, like a skillet and grill.

573

:

At each camp site.

574

:

That's something kind of new.

575

:

This year I got a lot of people

asking about having private a

576

:

space to cook over the campfire.

577

:

So going to be investing there 'cause

I know people are looking at that, but

578

:

they are still bringing their own food.

579

:

Coolers are a big problem for me because

coolers are not very backpack friendly.

580

:

I have people that are

really into gear and stuff.

581

:

I've seen some really

cool backpack coolers.

582

:

But for my folks that I don't wanna

turn away somebody that wants to do

583

:

the experience and maybe they haven't

been backpacking and don't have gear,

584

:

that's part of, I wanna be able to

help people that haven't had that

585

:

experience, have that experience.

586

:

Working through that, there is, there's

a restaurant and then actually two bars

587

:

that are within a mile of the campground.

588

:

So it is very easy for people to act

if they wanna like order out pizza or

589

:

go for burgers or something like that.

590

:

There is food very readily available.

591

:

Just down the road.

592

:

And I'm also three miles from

a winery too, which is cool.

593

:

Stephanie Bias: Oh, nice.

594

:

Brian Searl: That's what

I need is the pizza place.

595

:

Like I can survive.

596

:

I know how to do the fire with the

flint and steel and all that kind.

597

:

I can build a shelter,

but I need my pizza.

598

:

Yeah, you all that.

599

:

And I just need to go to the pizza

restaurant, come back and I'm fine.

600

:

Chris Jeub: Chelsi, this

is really encouraging.

601

:

You are crushing it out there.

602

:

Chelsi Low: Oh, thank you Chris.

603

:

I'm gonna, I just feel like I'm

figuring things out right now.

604

:

Chris Jeub: But yeah, you are you're

going in your second year, right?

605

:

So I'm going in my sixth year.

606

:

So you remind me of a lot.

607

:

A lot of the lot of my first year

boy, I was just, it was awesome.

608

:

You're doing 50% direct

bookings is incredible.

609

:

And that's Yeah,

610

:

Chelsi Low: I was surprised

by that, honestly.

611

:

And I'm not marketing and

getting out there and selling

612

:

myself is not my strength.

613

:

I could definitely use help in that area.

614

:

Chris Jeub: Yeah.

615

:

I would say most of us and the, who

are the beginner accommodations offers.

616

:

We dream to get off of Airbnb and

Verbo and all those, but direct

617

:

and I'll be all direct bookings.

618

:

So 50 percent's really good.

619

:

I'd encourage you if you're open

to a couple of ideas, 'cause

620

:

these are things I kinda learned

621

:

Chelsi Low: Absolutely.

622

:

Chris Jeub: After my first

year is the whole idea.

623

:

Absolutely.

624

:

Those amenities that you charge for

really bring in a lot of revenue and

625

:

you could provide, I, this is what I do.

626

:

I provide grills to each of my units.

627

:

But then I charge for the propane.

628

:

So thirty-five dollars for

propane service is what I give.

629

:

And it costs about $15

to fill a propane tank.

630

:

And I just service the propane when

they pay the thirty-five dollars.

631

:

Having a, getting a professional

photographer out there to actually

632

:

spend the night and take the

pictures of the sun going down or

633

:

sun rising and things like that.

634

:

Getting that nice, the people that

have those $2,000 cameras that

635

:

can take these popping awesome

photos would that sells the place.

636

:

That's something that I, it took me

about a year or two to figure out, and

637

:

then I did guided hikes for a while.

638

:

Okay.

639

:

Yeah.

640

:

Yeah.

641

:

You, you mentioned the tubing and stuff.

642

:

Yves Ballenegger: The tubing.

643

:

Yeah, the tubing.

644

:

You said the tubing,

645

:

Chris Jeub: the minutes old next.

646

:

It just started coming outta

me, but I did guided hikes.

647

:

I'm really close to Pike National Forest

and I don't do it anymore, just 'cause it.

648

:

It's time consuming, but at the early

days I did it and it was really fun

649

:

to really connect with the people.

650

:

Zach said, an experiential stay.

651

:

They just feel like they got

the red carpet rolled out for

652

:

'em and I would get to know 'em.

653

:

And so we would take, I would take

my dog for a walk and we would just

654

:

walk and talk and just get to know

each other while we walked Pike

655

:

National Forest for a little bit.

656

:

And and that was really good.

657

:

And then I charge 'em,

charge 'em 50 bucks.

658

:

And they were always pleased.

659

:

So those are some, so

those are some ideas.

660

:

It's, but you're encouraging

to see just budding it out of

661

:

year one and this is awesome.

662

:

Chelsi.

663

:

Zach Stoltenberg: Yeah, to

664

:

Chelsi Low: Thanks for that, Chris.

665

:

Yes.

666

:

Thank you for those suggestions.

667

:

And I agree on the photos.

668

:

I just need to bite the

bullet and spend the money.

669

:

I got a lot of great photographers.

670

:

I know.

671

:

And,

672

:

Chris Jeub: yeah hip camp actually

offers a kind of a photography offer.

673

:

And I've actually invited my hip camp

photographer, that was, it started with,

674

:

every year I take professional photos

that the, I invite the photographer here.

675

:

She spends the night, she brings

her kids are the models for it.

676

:

And then I just get those

popping great photos.

677

:

And the rest of the year I take 'em with

my cell phone, so like when a development

678

:

comes or I offer a new amenity, I'll just

do the best I can with my cell phone.

679

:

But then I upgrade it every year with

that professional and she's 300 bucks.

680

:

And then I give her a tip,

so she keeps coming back.

681

:

Zach Stoltenberg: Yeah,

to build on that too.

682

:

Chelsi you talked about a couple of

those, excursions or activities, right?

683

:

That there's already, operators in your

area that are doing kayaking and tubing.

684

:

One suggestion I would make is that

I don't think you have to reinvent

685

:

yourself or do something different.

686

:

Several different operators that we've

worked with on the designs, they've said,

687

:

Hey, we have all this stuff in the area.

688

:

So I think if you have.

689

:

Fishing guides, if you have a kayak

or tubing operation that's nearby

690

:

I would look for opportunities

just to partner with them.

691

:

See if they would offer a referral or a

finder's fee where it's something that

692

:

you could make available to your guests.

693

:

Put it on your website.

694

:

Hey, if you want to book a kayak

trip here's the link to do and it

695

:

just links out to that operator's

website, they book with them.

696

:

But for every one of those referrals

that comes from that unique.

697

:

For that.

698

:

So you brought the guests there, you

connected them with the experience.

699

:

They're gonna go and it's gonna be

facilitated by that third party operator.

700

:

But there's value, there's additional

revenue that you can create through

701

:

partnerships and that's a way to,

get some money flowing back in some

702

:

additional revenue for you based on

what you've built and what you're

703

:

bringing to that area without being

something that you necessarily

704

:

have to facilitate or invest in.

705

:

The same with restaurants.

706

:

I, if you've got two, three restaurants

that, that you mentioned go and

707

:

talk to 'em and say, you know what?

708

:

I wanna put one of your menus in each of

my tents and I'd love it if you'd give

709

:

me a coupon for 10% off for my guests

if they come and they eat at your place.

710

:

And, or maybe even create your

own little coupon or something so

711

:

that they have a way to track it.

712

:

So you come back, say, let's try

it for three months, and you come

713

:

in at the end of three months and

they've got 40 tickets stacked up.

714

:

They know that, you've brought that

many people into their business.

715

:

And so maybe you work out again, some

sort of a referral, some kind of a bonus

716

:

or a credit or something on the back.

717

:

And so there, there's ways to

make revenue and create those

718

:

additional revenue streams outside

of, having to do something yourself.

719

:

Stephanie Bias: That's

a great point, Zach.

720

:

That's been really successful

for us at Camp Aramoni too.

721

:

We're in a pretty, I don't wanna

say touristy area, but within

722

:

nearby state park there are a lot

of different businesses offering

723

:

different activities, kayaking,

whitewater rafting, believe it or not.

724

:

So I, yeah, I would really agree with

Zach that you should reach out to these

725

:

people and talk about that finder's fee.

726

:

Chris Jeub: In fact, if I could add

on to the add-on getting involved

727

:

with the Chamber of commerce, I

have found to be just a goldmine.

728

:

You're the cool kid in the Chamber

of Commerce among all the dentists

729

:

and realtors and things like that.

730

:

You're the glamping person

and and you really are cool.

731

:

And they love to connect

with area, an area.

732

:

Cool accommodation.

733

:

Brian Searl: All right.

734

:

I wanna switch this for a second.

735

:

I'd love to catch up with

Alessandro 'cause it's been a

736

:

while since we had him on the show.

737

:

Do you wanna, just for the people

who maybe didn't see you on the first

738

:

appearance you had here and are gonna

get to know you as you continue to

739

:

appear on the show, just tell us a

little bit about what you have going on.

740

:

Alessandro, please.

741

:

Alessandro van de Loo: Yeah, sure.

742

:

Actually my family has been in like outer

hospitality business for many years now.

743

:

I think last summer we celebrated the

40th anniversary of them in the business.

744

:

But our brand Vaan called Quarter, which

in Italian means holiday with your heart.

745

:

So really personal was

founded four years ago.

746

:

Actually quite a bad timing because we

had a covid crisis rushing in to our

747

:

operation, like really in our first years.

748

:

But what we are trying to do, we started

with actually two locations that belonged

749

:

to my parents for many times and now we.

750

:

Had this idea to create a little

chain of boutique locations and

751

:

in like our terms, boutique is

between 50 and 350 units on a site.

752

:

And the advantage of have, having

like several locations is that we are

753

:

trying to build a guest community.

754

:

So we are investing quite a lot in like

our database, our CRM strategies keeping

755

:

up on like our social media community.

756

:

And at the end we I mean we are aware

that people are actually booking

757

:

one holiday a year because in, in

Europe we are mainly serving the

758

:

school holiday for family with kids.

759

:

So normally people are

doing it once a year.

760

:

Sometimes they visit us like twice, but

it's always like one bigger period and one

761

:

maybe weekend or like couple of days stay.

762

:

But by, by offering them like the same.

763

:

The same kind of service

on different locations.

764

:

We give them the opportunity to

change destination every year,

765

:

but finding the concept that they

apparently like and yeah, that,

766

:

that's actually what we're doing.

767

:

We are opening a new resort that will

be ready summer:

768

:

It's a lake, Trasimeno lake, so it's

just one and a half hour north of Rome.

769

:

And yeah, then we take it from there.

770

:

So we will have this up and running.

771

:

That's number nine.

772

:

And then we will see like what

opportunities are coming on our way.

773

:

And besides this, we are quite

yeah organized to distribute

774

:

our holidays ourselves.

775

:

You were saying like 50% direct?

776

:

We are doing roughly 60% direct.

777

:

And my personal job within the company

is more on the marketing and sales part.

778

:

My task is to get this 60% up to

probably 70, 75%, which is I think the

779

:

highest we can realistically reach.

780

:

And to give you some numbers, we are

doing around 35,000 bookings a year.

781

:

And also like running all

the FMBs on every site.

782

:

We have a restaurant and

a shop, and we are running

783

:

everything within our business.

784

:

Brian Searl: Where do you, I'm curious

where you see the European glamping

785

:

market headed in the next few years.

786

:

Generally speaking,

787

:

Alessandro van de Loo: I think

generally speaking, what's the most

788

:

interesting thing is that Europe has

a strong tradition in regular camping.

789

:

And until 10, 12, 15 years ago you

had like people going to campings

790

:

on holiday and people going to

hotels or resorts or whatever.

791

:

What we are seeing now, and I think

glamping is playing a big part in

792

:

this transition, is that basically

every family with kids in Europe

793

:

is a potential target for us.

794

:

So people are switching a

lot between type of holidays.

795

:

Maybe one year they just

rent a holiday home.

796

:

One year they go glamping.

797

:

One year they go to Asia then one

year they stay home because they are

798

:

renewing like the garden or whatever.

799

:

It's really our target group is

growing a lot, but the loyalty

800

:

of customers is getting smaller.

801

:

So the way we approach

them is really changing.

802

:

So that's I think point number one.

803

:

And I think point number two

is that at this moment two

804

:

type of initiatives popping up.

805

:

In Europe.

806

:

You have this like very big operations

normally backed up by like investment

807

:

funds or private equity companies that

are like building crazy results with

808

:

a lot of very professional facilities.

809

:

But in my opinion, sometimes a bit,

a lack of personality they're just

810

:

technically perfect, but the soul is

sometimes a bit missing or it's very fake.

811

:

And then you have on the other

side is very small operations

812

:

that I have 5, 6, 10, 15 units.

813

:

And those ones are the ones that are

really done with a lot of passion.

814

:

And I think they are actually serving

very different needs of customers.

815

:

But also here a customer can one time.

816

:

Decide to go to the big

professional destination.

817

:

And the other time they

just picked the small one.

818

:

So it's really we really

see like this this blurred

819

:

borders between the businesses.

820

:

And what we are noticing in Europe is

that you have, traditionally, you have

821

:

hotels holiday resorts attraction parks,

so yeah, the Disney World or whatever.

822

:

And in the last years we saw

that these three categories

823

:

are really moving together.

824

:

So you have this big attraction

businesses that are creating beds.

825

:

So giving the guests the

opportunity to sleep over.

826

:

And the big campsite or

glamping operations that are

827

:

investing in attractions.

828

:

So it is really at the end it's

outer hospitality and you can

829

:

attack it from different angles, but

the outcome will be very similar.

830

:

And that's really a trend

over here at the moment.

831

:

Brian Searl: All right, Zach, I have

three questions for you all in a row.

832

:

Ready?

833

:

Number one is rebuttal or

thoughts on that, right?

834

:

As it relates to the glamour market

in the United States, Canada.

835

:

Is that kind of the same way it's headed?

836

:

Two is it the same in The Bahamas?

837

:

And then you can segue into

telling us about what we were

838

:

doing down there, please, because

I really wanna hear about that.

839

:

And then three, do you need like any

kind of a show host to go stay and

840

:

test out things in The Bahamas, maybe

do a live show from down there, or.

841

:

Zach Stoltenberg: Yeah, so I, I would

echo a lot of what Alessandro was saying.

842

:

I think the US glamping market

I'd like to say we're we're

843

:

teenagers right now, right?

844

:

Like the industry's starting to evolve

and mature a little bit finding our way.

845

:

We're starting to grow up a little bit.

846

:

This last week I actually

spent out at Zion.

847

:

Utah.

848

:

And they stayed with big Noel Dutson

and his team with OpenSky was absolutely

849

:

blown away by, by what they've built,

what they've done in the last two years.

850

:

And they've really truly raised the

bar for what, luxury glamping means.

851

:

These guys are doing it

right and they're killing it.

852

:

And when you look at an area

like Zion, it's a huge demand.

853

:

It's a huge market, but

it's also hit saturation.

854

:

You look at the number of

campgrounds and RV resorts and

855

:

everything that's been developed

out there in the last five years.

856

:

There's tons and tons even, within 10

miles of their site, I'll bet there's

857

:

over a thousand units that are available.

858

:

And, working with them and talking

through what some of their goals

859

:

are for growth and expansion.

860

:

Does it make sense to keep

investing in some of those areas?

861

:

And one of the things that I told

them, I said, they've worked so

862

:

hard to differentiate themselves

and really focus on guest experience

863

:

and delivering this luxury.

864

:

I.

865

:

Accommodation.

866

:

Nobody else in that market, even though

it's busy and saturated, nobody is coming

867

:

close to delivering what they're doing.

868

:

And so I think when we look at

the glamping market, when we

869

:

look at especially some of these

areas of the country that we're

870

:

seeing a large concentration of

new developments, the Grand Canyon

871

:

Smoky, Mountains hill Country, Texas.

872

:

I think these operators that are really

targeting a top tier quality, luxury guest

873

:

experience, they're gonna be just fine.

874

:

I think as we come into, some

of those saturated markets, it's

875

:

gonna be the people at the bottom

that are really gonna struggle.

876

:

It's gonna be the guys that started

with five or 10 units haven't really

877

:

done any sort of iteration or additions.

878

:

They haven't invested in their site

since they opened, five years ago.

879

:

And it's gonna be the smaller operators,

I think that are really gonna struggle to,

880

:

to differentiate themselves and to keep

up with an ever increasing demand for a

881

:

higher level of guest expectation on site.

882

:

Brian Searl: But they can, right?

883

:

There are ways that they can.

884

:

Do They can.

885

:

Zach Stoltenberg: Absolutely.

886

:

Absolutely.

887

:

Yes.

888

:

Yeah.

889

:

And in a lot of ways, a lot of these

big established operators that we've

890

:

seen come on board, hit the ground,

really, got a lot of traction in the

891

:

marketplace and then they sold out to

private equity groups and after that

892

:

acquisition, we're starting to see now.

893

:

Kind of a pullback where some of these,

established industry names have laid

894

:

off lots of their staff that were

people that have been with them from the

895

:

beginning, that, that built that business.

896

:

They pulled back on expansion plans.

897

:

They're trying to make those

operations more lean and more

898

:

efficient and more profitable because

that's what private equity does.

899

:

And we're starting to already see some

of those times turn especially some

900

:

of the established industry operators.

901

:

And I think that's a real opportunity

for the smaller independent folks

902

:

to say, you know what yeah, we

don't have the budgets of some of

903

:

these big established companies, but

we're gonna do something different.

904

:

We're gonna focus on creating

an authentic experience.

905

:

I think that's really what

Alessandra was talking about.

906

:

Really creating something that, that

there's care, there's a tension.

907

:

And that's really what OpenSky

has done so well, is create this,

908

:

really unique luxury, personalized

attention to detail and experience.

909

:

So I think that's what I see industry-wide

in, in the US is some of these areas are

910

:

starting to get saturation, but the people

are really focusing on guest experience

911

:

and customer satisfaction communication.

912

:

They're gonna be just fine and

they're gonna continue to be

913

:

differentiators in the market.

914

:

So to give you some insight on

Bahamas one of our first international

915

:

projects that we're working on,

we're pretty excited about that.

916

:

Working with a really incredible owner

and investor that has a very unique

917

:

vision for what he wants to build there.

918

:

The properties are a couple of

different islands in The Bahamas.

919

:

And there's it's a very desirable area.

920

:

Several of the cruise ships own

islands that are across the ocean or

921

:

across the harbor from where we're at.

922

:

It's already a hotbed for tourism.

923

:

But the focus is to create an

off grid sustainable eco-resort.

924

:

And the properties, currently it's two

uninhabited islands in The Bahamas.

925

:

So we spent a couple days down there

with the owner and with some of his

926

:

team of people that are really focused

on bringing this thing to life.

927

:

And it's very different.

928

:

There's definitely some logistical

challenges we're dealing with.

929

:

We ha in, in the U.S, I

can design anything, right?

930

:

Because chances are, within 30 to 50

miles, you've got a lumber yard, you've

931

:

got, shipping and transportation,

you've got utilities available.

932

:

Really looking at this

site there's nothing there.

933

:

There's not a way to get a truck there.

934

:

We're not getting deliveries there.

935

:

There's no utilities anywhere.

936

:

And so how do we kind of pivot

and I think, Chelsi's, I see

937

:

you're smiling 'cause that's

exactly what you've had to do.

938

:

But it's created a

really unique challenge.

939

:

It's fun now that we're starting to

work through some of the design pieces

940

:

of this because it's not just designing

an incredible unit that somebody's

941

:

gonna want to come and spend a week at.

942

:

It's still maintaining all those

creature comforts to focus on guest

943

:

experience and then figuring out.

944

:

How do we package that all where we can

ship it, to The Bahamas and then get it

945

:

on a boat and then get it off of the boat

and onto an island and get it set up.

946

:

So it's proved so far to be a really

fun, really interesting project.

947

:

So we'll see where it ends up.

948

:

But like I said, it's one

of my favorite things.

949

:

Everybody asks me always what's your

favorite project that you've worked on?

950

:

And then, and I give them

the same answer every time.

951

:

It's whatever I'm working on right now.

952

:

Because it is just fun to pour

your heart and your soul and your

953

:

passion for what you're doing

into each one of those projects.

954

:

So we're in the thick of it

on that one right now, so it's

955

:

been a lot of fun and exciting.

956

:

I think that just

957

:

Brian Searl: highlights

right, the need for.

958

:

What, maybe not the need for,

but the benefit of having

959

:

expertise where you need it.

960

:

I can buy an island in The Bahamas

and I have this team together that

961

:

has this vision and they've, built

or imagined what my dream is, but now

962

:

I need somebody to actually execute

on it in your case, what do I do?

963

:

How do I get the permitting?

964

:

How do I figure out all those

logistics things like that.

965

:

It's the same with our sponsor

that I forgot to mention.

966

:

Horizon.

967

:

Outdoor, Hospitality.

968

:

Bringing in experts like that

who can help you manage your

969

:

campground, Scott Foose and his team.

970

:

Thank you guys for sponsoring

the show as always, and I'll try

971

:

to remember to mention you more

than this at end of the show.

972

:

But everybody, like everybody sticks

around for the end of the show, right?

973

:

Because Zach and all of our

guests are talking and they

974

:

don't wanna miss anything.

975

:

So it really, maybe it's better that

I've mentioned you at the end of the show

976

:

anyway, but Horizon, Outdoor, Hospitality

great management services for campgrounds

977

:

and RV parks and planting resorts too.

978

:

But yeah again, just like that

was an intentional segue, right?

979

:

But not like making things up.

980

:

Those kinds of.

981

:

People like you are.

982

:

Zach Stoltenberg: Yeah.

983

:

It takes a team and we're

a small part on that team.

984

:

We've got lots of

different folks involved.

985

:

And everybody's pretty equally

passionate about what we're doing,

986

:

Brian Searl: all right.

987

:

We got a couple minutes left.

988

:

Does anybody have any final thoughts

before we head off for the week?

989

:

Chris Jeub: We are, I, Zach was a

guest speaker of my mastermind just

990

:

last week, and he was staying at

Open Sky, so he got to pop his laptop

991

:

open and walk through the tents.

992

:

Very impressive.

993

:

I think I'm gonna take my wife out

there for a little tax write off and

994

:

experience open Sky out in out, out west.

995

:

So

996

:

Stephanie Bias: it is Valentine's day.

997

:

Chris Jeub: You're right.

998

:

I should book a night

999

:

Brian Searl: For all those men who forgot.

:

00:49:53,332 --> 00:49:53,992

It's Valentine's day,

:

00:49:54,182 --> 00:50:01,092

Stephanie Bias: The look of

surprise on everyone's face.

:

00:50:02,342 --> 00:50:04,052

Zach Stoltenberg: We're all

distracted in Kansas City.

:

00:50:04,052 --> 00:50:07,022

We got a little parade thing

going on today, but everybody

:

00:50:07,022 --> 00:50:08,857

is wearing red I, I dunno.

:

00:50:10,357 --> 00:50:11,317

Stephanie Bias: Yeah, that's a start.

:

00:50:12,097 --> 00:50:12,667

Brian Searl: That counts.

:

00:50:13,657 --> 00:50:15,697

Alright guys, thanks for

being in another episode here.

:

00:50:15,702 --> 00:50:18,487

If we don't have any final thoughts,

thanks to our recurring guests,

:

00:50:19,087 --> 00:50:22,277

Zach and Chris for, being here and

then obviously our new recurring

:

00:50:22,277 --> 00:50:24,107

guests, Alessandro, Stephanie.

:

00:50:24,527 --> 00:50:26,297

Hopefully it was okay for you guys.

:

00:50:26,297 --> 00:50:27,027

We'll get together, right?

:

00:50:27,027 --> 00:50:28,442

We need, be more forceful.

:

00:50:28,952 --> 00:50:30,812

Interject yourself with presentations.

:

00:50:31,142 --> 00:50:34,472

Feel free to, to speak up whenever

you want, because again, as I've said

:

00:50:34,472 --> 00:50:38,162

before on all these episodes, the

less I talk, the better the shows are.

:

00:50:38,792 --> 00:50:43,282

And then thanks to Eve and Chelsi

for being here and Eve where can they

:

00:50:43,282 --> 00:50:44,402

find out more about Groovy Yurts?

:

00:50:45,419 --> 00:50:47,962

Yves Ballenegger: Groovyyerts.com

would be the best the best way.

:

00:50:47,962 --> 00:50:49,112

Or call us.

:

00:50:49,472 --> 00:50:49,952

We would be happy.

:

00:50:49,952 --> 00:50:51,302

We're on social media as well.

:

00:50:51,302 --> 00:50:53,492

Or just come and visit, or

we'll come and visit you.

:

00:50:54,932 --> 00:50:55,602

Brian Searl: All right, Chelsi.

:

00:50:55,622 --> 00:50:57,112

Where can they find out

more about Aefintyr?

:

00:50:57,942 --> 00:50:58,442

Chelsi Low: Yes.

:

00:50:58,442 --> 00:51:01,212

AefintyrOutdoors.com.

:

00:51:01,592 --> 00:51:06,992

And then I'm also on Instagram, Facebook

and Google Maps, too is a great way to

:

00:51:06,992 --> 00:51:08,627

just find the website if you Google it.

:

00:51:09,377 --> 00:51:09,527

Brian Searl: All right.

:

00:51:09,527 --> 00:51:11,297

Chelsi Low: It was wonderful

talking with all of you.

:

00:51:11,507 --> 00:51:12,077

A pleasure.

:

00:51:12,082 --> 00:51:12,357

Chris Jeub: Yeah, it's great.

:

00:51:12,837 --> 00:51:13,797

Brian Searl: I guess

we have a minute left.

:

00:51:13,797 --> 00:51:15,957

Yves Ballenegger: I love to hear

that in general, the, since the

:

00:51:15,957 --> 00:51:20,272

future is into into this positive

experience into the stories into

:

00:51:20,272 --> 00:51:22,752

really customer service and your story.

:

00:51:22,752 --> 00:51:25,517

Chelsi is inspiring and

yeah, that that's positive.

:

00:51:27,437 --> 00:51:27,677

Brian Searl: Alright.

:

00:51:27,767 --> 00:51:29,117

A couple seconds left, Zach.

:

00:51:29,117 --> 00:51:30,437

Where can they find out

more about Clockwork?

:

00:51:32,197 --> 00:51:38,612

Zach Stoltenberg: Clockwork-ad.com

Clockwork-Adarchitecturedesign.com.

:

00:51:39,452 --> 00:51:42,672

We're also on Instagram and

all the socials as well.

:

00:51:42,982 --> 00:51:44,032

Or come and meet us.

:

00:51:44,092 --> 00:51:47,222

We're going to several different

trade shows and marketing events.

:

00:51:47,252 --> 00:51:50,662

We'll be at the Glamping Show, be

it the other hospitality conference.

:

00:51:50,852 --> 00:51:55,562

We're actually reaching out to do several

traditional hospitality events this year.

:

00:51:55,562 --> 00:52:00,487

So we'll be at HD and trying to teach

the traditional hotel industry of what

:

00:52:00,487 --> 00:52:02,737

opportunity lies in outdoor hospitality.

:

00:52:02,977 --> 00:52:05,047

Brian Searl: So that's

actually an interesting topic.

:

00:52:05,057 --> 00:52:07,637

We should spend a show talking

about that blend, right?

:

00:52:07,637 --> 00:52:10,337

Because I was thinking that when she

was, when Chelsi was talking about

:

00:52:10,337 --> 00:52:12,562

all the, where she gets the bookings

from, that there's just that kind

:

00:52:12,562 --> 00:52:15,742

of unfair advantage with Glamping,

where you can do hip camp and Airbnb.

:

00:52:16,192 --> 00:52:17,152

You're not one or the other, right?

:

00:52:17,542 --> 00:52:20,482

And so you almost have more opportunities

to market yourself in some cases.

:

00:52:20,482 --> 00:52:24,532

But Chris, we're gonna find out more about

either your resort or the Glamping guy.

:

00:52:24,532 --> 00:52:25,342

You can only pick one.

:

00:52:25,987 --> 00:52:27,967

Chris Jeub: Glamping guy.com.

:

00:52:28,207 --> 00:52:31,327

I'm actually just finishing up my

first class eight weeks to launch.

:

00:52:31,367 --> 00:52:34,712

Like we like the, my first students

and I'm very excited about how

:

00:52:34,712 --> 00:52:35,912

that curriculum is unfolding.

:

00:52:36,782 --> 00:52:38,442

Glampingguy.com is my website

:

00:52:39,252 --> 00:52:39,642

Brian Searl: awesome.

:

00:52:39,642 --> 00:52:40,212

Stephanie Camparamone

:

00:52:40,422 --> 00:52:43,002

Stephanie Bias: Camparamone.com

:

00:52:43,482 --> 00:52:44,442

Brian Searl: and Alessandro

:

00:52:45,642 --> 00:52:47,412

Alessandro van de Loo:

Vacanzecolcuore.com.

:

00:52:48,402 --> 00:52:50,262

And it's quite difficult to spell.

:

00:52:50,352 --> 00:52:51,882

Zach Stoltenberg: Yeah, you

might have to spell that for us.

:

00:52:55,537 --> 00:52:57,132

Alessandro van de Loo: It's

actually on the back of my screen.

:

00:52:57,792 --> 00:52:59,292

Brian Searl: It's reversed

the camera's here.

:

00:53:00,762 --> 00:53:02,172

Alessandro van de Loo: Next

time I'll be better prepared.

:

00:53:02,172 --> 00:53:03,462

Brian Searl: Everything's

working against you.

:

00:53:03,462 --> 00:53:03,852

All right.

:

00:53:04,372 --> 00:53:04,822

Thank you guys.

:

00:53:04,822 --> 00:53:07,222

I really appreciate you for joining us

on our episode of MC Fireside Chats.

:

00:53:07,222 --> 00:53:09,592

We'll see you next week for our

campground owners focused episode

:

00:53:09,592 --> 00:53:11,992

and all of our recurring guests,

again in one month from today.

:

00:53:12,262 --> 00:53:12,862

Thank you guys.

:

00:53:12,952 --> 00:53:13,432

Have a great day.

:

00:53:13,432 --> 00:53:13,912

Thank you.

:

00:53:14,152 --> 00:53:15,457

Alright everyone.

:

00:53:15,922 --> 00:53:16,257

Thanks everybody.

:

00:53:17,197 --> 00:53:20,947

For joining us for this

episode of MC Fireside Chats

:

00:53:21,007 --> 00:53:22,747

with your host Brian Searle.

:

00:53:22,867 --> 00:53:24,787

Have a suggestion for a show idea.

:

00:53:25,057 --> 00:53:27,577

Want your campground or

company and new future episode?

:

00:53:27,727 --> 00:53:30,607

Email us at hello at moderncampground.com.

:

00:53:30,727 --> 00:53:34,927

Get your daily dose of news from

Moderncampground.com, and be sure to join

:

00:53:34,927 --> 00:53:39,337

us next week from more insights into the

fascinating world of outdoor hospitality.

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